Posts in the category »   «  ( 148 Posts )

  • Three new papers: paleotsunamis, neotectonics in Greece; ESI2007 in Slovenia

    Three papers published recently caught my eyes. First, Andrej Gosar investigated the earthquake environmental effects (EEEs) of the 12 April 1998 Mw =5.6 Krn Mountains earthquake, Slovenia. The quake measured VII-VIII on the EMS-98 scale, and Andrej found that the intensities reached the same values on the ESI2007 scale. He reports that the intensity distributions for both scales are comparable, but show some differences due to the sparsely populated epicentral area. The research concentrated on rockfalls for EEE determination. It’s a nice example that also moderate events can be characterized using the ESI2007 scale.

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  • Active Fault Database for Northern Greece

    Databases for active faults are a major input for seismic hazard assessment and have been widely developed in several countries (such as USA, Japan, Italy and New Zealand). Despite the fact that Greece is the country of highest seismicity in Europe where almost 50% of the total seismic energy is realized, no official or unofficial active fault database exists. This is partly due to the fact that there are so many active faults that introduce a heavy workload, whereas several of them are also located offshore. This is particularly difficult for engineers since according to the latest the seismic building code that was released in 2000, no houses should be founded on active faults. more

  • Video on geological and geophysical field work in Greece – The dirt people reloaded

    I have made a video of our fieldwork in Greece, because I guess somehow we must communicate to the public what our work is about. Also, we must encourage young people to study geosciences. Well, now I concentrated on the second task: Hey, clever young people out there! Do you like science? Do you like nature? Are you interested in the big questions like “Where does this rock come from? When will the next earthquake happen? Where can I find groundwater? Why do volcanoes erupt? Which coast is threatened by Tsunamis?” Do you like to travel abroad, to work hard and to still have fun in the evenings? Do you want to meet nice people? If you answered “yes” to at least one of the above, think about studying geoscience. more

  • What’s up? The Friday links (31)

    Elsevier is facing ongoing protests, especially from the blogosphere. Not only did thousands of scientists sign the boycott (no publishing, no reviewing, no editorial work), but more issues come up step by step. How much is an open access article? $0? Nope. Sauropod Vertebra Picture of the Week found out it’s 10.88 GBP (~13 €). Amazing. more

  • Published electronic material available for download from the 2nd INQUA- IGCP 567 Corinth 2011 International Workshop

    The 2nd INQUA- IGCP 567 International Workshop on “Active Tectonics, Earthquake Geology, Archaeology and Engineering” was held in Corinth 19-24 September 2011. The event has been organized jointly by the INQUA-TERPRO Focus Area on Paleoseismology and Active Tectonics and the IGCP-567 “Earthquake Archaeology”.

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  • Sunday Geology Picture: Alkyonides Gulf, Greece

    This beautiful, isolated rock stands in the Alkyonides Gulf, the northwestern part of the Gulf of Corinth. It has some beautiful notches, which indicate recent uplift. It is situated right on the footwall of an active fault, which was activated during the 1981 earthquake sequence. It is not so easy to use those notches as sea level indicators or for measuring tectonic movements if both effects have to be taken into account. The fault has a huge throw and a beautiful scarp (limestone) with lots of slickensides. One of my favourite places in Greece. Well, the entire Perachora peninsula is worth a visit – an earthquake geologist’s Disney Land!

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  • Saturday Geology Picture: Delphi, Greece

    Delphi is one of the most impressive places I’ve ever seen. The landscape is just breathtaking – the archaeological site is situated on the southern flank of the Parnassus Mountains, dominating the entire valley. You can see the Gulf of Corinth right from the temples, and due to the steep slope you feel like Delphi is built on many floors with the stadium being the roof. The oracle might be related to faults under the temple; some authors speculate that gas vents (ethane?) caused hallucinations of the priest, which were interpreted as the oracle. Another nice thing is that you can see the archaeoseismological damage from strong historical earthquakes everywhere – cracks, rotated and tilted walls, corner break-outs, dropped keystones in arches and so on. more

  • Cologne University – PhD position in Archaeoseismology available

    The University of Cologne (Seismological Station Bensberg) invites applications for an open position as a Doctoral Student. An essential part of the research activities of the candidate will be dedicated to his/her work on a dissertation project. This work will be part of a research project on Archaeoseismological Studies in Midea and Tiryns, Greece concerned with the possible seismogenic cause of the decline of the great Mycenaean palaces of the Argolis.

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  • What’s up? The Friday links (19)

    Let’s start with some good news: The first two Galileo satellites (Natalia and Thijs) will be launched today from Kourou. It’s a little behind the schedule (6 years) and the entire project has become a little more expensive than previously thought (1,600,000,000 €), but who cares? It will provide 1 m GPS resolution! 1 m!!!

    There is one more Archaeopteryx! Really! Soemone who does not want his name to be told handed out the fossil to scientists. After a thoroughly investigation of that great piece of Solnhofen Plattenkalk, the anonymous collector will get back his bird. No, his dinosaur I mean. Ehm, his Archaeopteryx.

    Dave Petley reported on a giant landslide in Iceland. It’s expected to have ~1,000,000 m³. See the amazing images, just great.

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  • 2nd day of the Corinth2011 meeting

    9:00 The second day started with a great keynote, Chris Scholz talked about earthquake triggering and fault synchronization with examples from California and Iceland.

    09:45 Next great keynote: Clark Burchfiel on the Wenchuan EQ!

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