Posts in the category »  Paper «  ( 274 Posts )

  • The QUIN project

    This is a guest post by Simone Bello from the Università degli Studi G. d’Annunzio Chieti e Pescara, Italy.

    The QUIN project (QUaternary fault strain INdicators database) stems from the initiative of a group of researchers to make the structural-geological data of the potentially seismogenic faults cropping out along the entire Apennines in Italy available to the scientific community.

    Strain and regional stress databases of active deformation patterns are largely available in the literature but are almost exclusively derived from earthquakes and geodetic data. However, in areas such as Italy, where the regional stress field has remained unchanged over the last few million years, the analysis of structural data relevant for seismogenic purposes can be extended at least to the overall Quaternary time interval. QUIN was born with this assumption. It is designed to integrate, unify, and elaborate high-detailed geologic information on potentially seismogenic faults and provides data on the location, attitude, kinematics, and deformation axes of Fault Striation Pairs (FSPs) measured along Quaternary faults.

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, active tectonics, and archaeoseismology (Feb 2024)

    Enjoy our latest papers on large earthquake and active faults!

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, active tectonics, and archaeoseismology (Jan 2024) 

    Here’s the latest list of papers on paleoseismology and related fields. Interesting stuff from the NZ and US seismic hazard models, a photo of the fault scarp that formed underwater in the 2011 Tohoku-oki Earthquake, and much more. Have a great 2024 everyone!

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  • Call for papers in Special Issue “Earthquake Geology of Plate Margins and Plate Interiors: Integrating Classical Methods with New Approaches”

    Our colleague Tejpal Singh and his co-guest editors Riccardo Caputo and Chittenipattu P. Rajendran invite contributions to their special issue “Earthquake Geology of Plate Margins and Plate Interiors: Integrating Classical Methods with New Approaches” to be published in Geosciences. Please find more info here:

  • New Paper: Holocene earthquakes near Cusco, Peru

    In a new study, Rosell et al. look into the earthquake history of the Tambomachay Fault near Cusco in Peru. Cusco has been hit by damaging earthquakes in 1650, 1950, and 1986, and there is also some evidence for another earthquake during Inca times between AD 1418–1471. Very little is known about the causative faults. There is also very limited information on older events. The closest fault to the city is a 20 km-long normal fault at the northern margin of the Cusco Basin, the Tambomachay Fault. Here we constrained the fault’s Holocene slip rate by dating offset lateral moraines, and we identified three Holocene surface ruptures in a paleoseismological trench. The study was recently published open access in τeκτoniκa.

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, active tectonics, and archaeoseismology (Dec 2023)

    This will be the last paper list of the year, time is flying. We have classical paleoseismological studies, historical earthquake research, a few papers on secondary effects, but also studies looking into more general physics questions of large earthquakes. Enjoy reading!

     

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, active tectonics, and archaeoseismology (Nov 2023)

    This has become a long list again, and I partly blame the New Zealanders who are currently publishing a lot of studies related to their new hazard model. Really cool work! But of course the inclined readers will also find other gems for their taste. As always – please send me paleoseismology studies that I have missed. Enjoy reading!

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, active tectonics, and archaeoseismology (Oct 2023)

    More and more papers emerge on the February, 2023 earthquakes in Turkey and the East Anatolian Fault System. Additionally, we have a database of paleoseismology studies in New Zealand (spoiler: it’s a lot!) and many more papers on paleoseismology and tectonic geomorphology. Enjoy reading!

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  • New paper: Why geomorphic indices often fail in active tectonics studies

    Geomorphic indices can tell us about the tectonic activity of an area. The idea is that the landscape records the signal of active tectonics, for example in its river network, in its erosion pattern, or in its roughness. Geomorphic indices allow us to quantify this, that is, we can use standard algorithms to calculate numbers from a DEM that say ‘active’ or ‘inactive’. This is very attractive because essentially, all that is needed is a DEM and a GIS (and perhaps MATLAB). The number of papers on geomorphic indices is currently exploding, and I guess the fact that the method is so cheap and easy to apply plays a major role in that. No expensive field work, still meaningful results. But is this always true? In a new open access paper, we argue that without ground checking, probably not, at least in many cases.

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, active tectonics, and archaeoseismology (Sep 2023)

    This month’s paper list has an usually large number of studies on active tectonics of the Balkans and southern Europe. Is this a sampling bias? Perhaps. Don’t hesitate to send recommendations if you publish something cool that you’d like to see included. Enjoy reading!

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