Posts in the category »   «  ( 230 Posts )

  • New papers on paleoseismology, earthquakes, and active tectonics (Aug 2021)

    Today’s paper list contains a lot of interesting studies on Asian tectonics, a few articles on the Ridgecrest Earthquake, and a number of papers that I was involved in (sorry for the shameless self-promotion). Enjoy reading and let me know if I have missed something.
    UPDATE 2021-08-03: Yes, I missed something. I added the last three papers by Rimando & Peace, Kempf & Moernaut, Amey et al., DePaolis et al., & Wils et al.

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, earthquakes, and active tectonics (Jul 2021)

    Interested in the active tectonics of the Bolivian Amazon? In remote sensing of surface ruptures? In tsunami deposits & turbidites? In archaeoseismology & creeping faults? Then check out the latest papers and find new studies on these topics and much more!

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, earthquakes, and active tectonics (Mar 2021)

    Today’s list is again very long. It contains a lot of really cool stuff from Central Europe and the Alps, and many interesting studies from China and Central Asia. Connoisseurs of American tectonics will also be happy I promise. Plus, quite a number of papers on methods and earthquake/fault physics in general. Enjoy reading!

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, earthquakes, and active tectonics (Dec 2020)

    This year was truly a roller coaster ride! A large part of the world is still battling Covid-19; meetings, conferences, and workshops are held online, and teaching has also changed a lot. December is usually crowded with deadlines and (virtual) AGU, but I hope you find some time to check out the latest papers on earthquakes, paleoseismology, and active tectonics. We have a great list of papers, this time with exciting news from Italy, New Zealand and the Dead Sea, a lot of historical seismicity studies, and many contributions on Asian tectonics. Stay safe & happy researching!

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, earthquakes, and active tectonics (Aug 2020)

    This time we have a number of studies on historical earthquakes, active tectonics studies from all around the world, a view review and methods articles, and plenty of tsunami stuff. Make sure to check out the new book on the geological record of extreme waves! Enjoy reading and let us know in case we’ve missed something.

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, earthquakes, and active tectonics (June 2020)

    It looks like publishing hasn’t been affected much by the Corona situation, this month’s list is probably the longest we’ve ever had. Enjoy reading and stay safe!

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  • Session on Advances in Archaeoseismology: Methods, Techniques, and Case Studies at the ESC 2020, 6-11 Sep, Corfu

    Klaus-G. Hinzen, Fabrizio Galadini, Shmuel Marco, Stathis Stiros, and Amanda M. Gaggioli invite contributions to an archaeoseismology session at the 37. Assembly of the European Seismological Commission (ESC) 2020, September 6-11 in Corfu, Greece. Deadline for abstract submission is April 12th 2020.

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  • Archaeoseismology – Earthquake damage in Machu Picchu

    A recent study presented at the GSA meeting concludes that the UNESCO World Heritage site of Machu Picchu in Peru was intentionally built on faulted bedrock in order to ease the quarrying of the huge blocks used as construction material (Menegat, 2019). But has Machu Picchu seen big earthquakes in its lifetime? And if so, can it tell us something about their magnitude? After all, there are plenty of earthquakes in Peru, not only at the subduction zone but also in the Andes (e.g., Wimpenny et al., 2018). Some strong instrumental events occurred less than 100 km away from the Inca site. However, in the area of Machu Picchu we knew little about strong earthquakes. That’s why in 2016 a group of researchers from Peru, France, and the UK including myself started to investigate the active faults around Cusco and archaeoseismological damage to Machu Picchu and other famous Inca sites nearby in the CUSCO-PATA project.

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, earthquakes, and active tectonics (Oct 2019)

    Today we have a lot of papers on historical events, some great classical paleoseismology studies, and seismic hazard stuff. Enjoy reading!

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  • Challenges & Conclusions from the 6th Int’l Colloquium on Historical earthquakes & Paleoseismology studies, Han-sur-Lesse, Belgium

    The 6th Int’l Colloquium on Historical earthquakes & Paleoseismology studies took place in October 2018 in Han-sur-Lesse, Belgium. Our colleagues Koen Van Noten, Thierry Camelbeeck, and  Thomas Lecocq have put together a nice summary of this event, pointing out future challenges in the field:

    From 24 to 26 October 2018 55 scientists from 14 countries gathered at Han-sur-Lesse in Belgium for the annual gathering of the Colloquium on Historical earthquakes and Seismology. During this well attended conference, four invited keynote talks, 27 oral and 16 poster contributions were presented. Topics in this multidisciplinary colloquium spanned four themes. The first three themes are recurrent themes in this Colloquium series and focused on (1) Seismology and Historical earthquakes, (2) Paleoseismology and (3) Archaeoseismology. The organisers also specifically wanted to focus on (4) Earthquakes and natural caves; a discipline in which major progress was recently made. This topic was heavily debated during the field trip to the Han-sur-Lesse and Rochefort caves on 25 October 2018. Hereinafter we summarise what was presented (see program) by the attendants and which challenges seismologists – and friends – face these days.

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