Posts in the category »   «  ( 224 Posts )

  • New paper: Active faults in the Bolivian Amazon

    The Bolivian Amazon is a vast plain with almost zero topography. It hosts a huge and dynamic river system on the east side of the Andes. So far, little was known about the active tectonics of the area. In a new paper, Umberto Lombardo and I show that there are active faults parallel to the Andes, and also perpendicular to the mountain front. We used the TanDEM-X DEM and geomorphological analyses of the fluvial system to investigate the faults and their impact on river dynamics. We show that in such a low-relief setting, dip-slip earthquakes can catastrophically change river courses. If you don’t have the time to read the full paper, here’s a short summary.

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, earthquakes, and active tectonics (May 2021)

    Here we go with a brand new list of papers that deal with past and recent large earthquakes, with tsunamis, and with active tectonics studies. A huge fraction of studies is on (Central) Asia this time. Enjoy reading & stay safe!

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, earthquakes, and active tectonics (Apr 2021)

    Just as last month we have a veeeery long list today. Quite a number of papers deal with new data from Central Asia and S America, but of course there’s also something on the menu for connoisseurs of archaeoseismology, European, N American & African tectonics, and physics-based fault studies. Enjoy reading, stay safe and let me know if I’ve overlooked something.

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, earthquakes, and active tectonics (Feb 2021)

    This time we have a lot of papers on the active tectonics of the Americas, especially along their west coast. Of course on the west coast you say? Sure, but the recent M5.6 in Guyana, a shallow thrust event in a seemingly aseismic area, reminded us that such quakes can basically happen everywhere and at any time – they are just rare and hard to find in the geological record. Enjoy reading!

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, earthquakes, and active tectonics (Dec 2020)

    This year was truly a roller coaster ride! A large part of the world is still battling Covid-19; meetings, conferences, and workshops are held online, and teaching has also changed a lot. December is usually crowded with deadlines and (virtual) AGU, but I hope you find some time to check out the latest papers on earthquakes, paleoseismology, and active tectonics. We have a great list of papers, this time with exciting news from Italy, New Zealand and the Dead Sea, a lot of historical seismicity studies, and many contributions on Asian tectonics. Stay safe & happy researching!

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, earthquakes, and active tectonics (Nov 2020)

    Since field work is not possible for many of us right now, it’s possibly a good idea to catch up with the latest literature on paleoseismology, active tectonics, and earthquake geology. This time there are many studies on Central Asian tectonics, but also interesting work on the Mediterranean and the US. Stay safe, enjoy reading, and please let me know if I’ve missed something.

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  • PhD position at GFZ Potsdam in Active Tectonics

    An interesting PhD position is open at GFZ Potsdam in the framework of the CRC1211- “Earth: evolution at the dry limit”. CRC1211 has the objective to study the mutual evolutionary relationships between earth surface processes and biota in arid to hyperarid conditions. Within the framework of project C05 “Adaptation of drainage to tectonic forcing”, the history of the macro‐scale drainages of the Atacama Desert will be examined using cosmogenic nuclide and amphipod speciation chronologies, combined with topographic analysis and kinematic modelling. Findings will be compared to the established broad‐scale tectonic and climatic context. More information and the link to the ad can be found here. Deadline for application is 15th October 2020. For further queries relating to the role’s responsibilities you can contact Dr. Pia Victor by email (pia.victor@gfz-potsdam.de).

  • Which are the must-read papers in tectonics and structural geology?

    The Tectonics and Structural Geology Division of EGU (TS) has started a great thing: They are asking the community to name 3-5 must-read papers in their field. This could be really old fundamental stuff or ground-breaking new research – whatever you think everyone in Tectonics & StructGeol should read. The TS team will then select the 40-50 most-voted papers, discuss each of them within the TS community on a public platform on a fortnightly basis, write a summary of each paper and its discussion, and create a compilation of the TS “Must-read” papers that will be permanently archived on EarthArXiv. You can place your vote here or read the blog post on how it works here. Thanks to Silvia Crosetto for pointing me to this cool initiative!

  • New papers on paleoseismology, earthquakes, and active tectonics (June 2020)

    It looks like publishing hasn’t been affected much by the Corona situation, this month’s list is probably the longest we’ve ever had. Enjoy reading and stay safe!

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, earthquakes, and active tectonics (May 2020)

    Normal life has come to a halt, but publishing papers apparently not. Here’s a lot of stuff to read at home: nice remote sensing studies, very cool field observations (good old days), an entire trilogy by Dirk Scherler and Wolfgang Schwanghart on drainage divides, and much more. Enjoy reading, tell me if I’ve missed something, and stay safe.

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