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  • Which are the must-read papers in tectonics and structural geology?

    The Tectonics and Structural Geology Division of EGU (TS) has started a great thing: They are asking the community to name 3-5 must-read papers in their field. This could be really old fundamental stuff or ground-breaking new research – whatever you think everyone in Tectonics & StructGeol should read. The TS team will then select the 40-50 most-voted papers, discuss each of them within the TS community on a public platform on a fortnightly basis, write a summary of each paper and its discussion, and create a compilation of the TS “Must-read” papers that will be permanently archived on EarthArXiv. You can place your vote here or read the blog post on how it works here. Thanks to Silvia Crosetto for pointing me to this cool initiative!

  • EGU session “Paleoseismicity, active faulting, surface deformation, and the implications on seismic hazard assessment (Fault2SHA)”

    Dear colleagues,

    we wish you a Happy New Year and would like to advertise our session on “Paleoseismicity, active faulting, surface deformation, and the implications on seismic hazard assessment (Fault2SHA)” at the EGU General Assembly in Vienna (April 8-13, 2018). Please consider submitting an abstract before the deadline on Wednesday, 10 January 2018, 13:00 Central European Time. Please consider contributing with your studies by submitting your abstract here:

    http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2018/session/27065
    more

  • Pre-EGU field trip to the the Bohemian Massif – orogenic root domains

    An interesting pre-EGU field trip will be organised by colleagues from the University of Vienna, focussing on some structural interesting outcrops near Vienna. Here is the announcement from Anna Rogowitz:

    The trip aims to provide a brief outlook on the processes occurring in orogenic root domains on the example of the Bohemian Massif in Austria. Special focus will be given to deformation structures and the influence of partial melting on deformation localization. The excellent exposures in the Bohemian Massif gives a great opportunity to study the interplay between chemical changes and deformation processes in the lower crust. Additionally the high amount of migmatisation in some areas of the Moldanubian domain allows for studying the influence of melt on deformation processes as well as the composition of the host rock on melt formation and strain partitioning between rocks of different composition and rheology. more

  • Active faulting session at EGU 2017: abstract deadline approaching

    As every year just after the holidays, the abstract deadline for the EGU General Assembly in Vienna (April 23-28, 2017)  is approaching.  This year, it is on Wednesday, 11 January 2016, 13:00 Central European Time.

    If you are still searching for a session to submit your abstract to, please consider our session on “Active faulting, surface deformation, and the earthquake cycle: new
    approaches, observations and insights” (TS5.3/EMRP4.3/NH4.9) at the following link:

    http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2017/session/23709

    Conveners: Esther Hintersberger, Kris Vanneste, Angela Landgraf, Silke Mechernich & Romain Le Roux-Mallouf more

  • Sessions of interest at EGU 2016

    The EGU General Assembly 2016 will be held in Vienna from 17-22 April, and the abstract deadline on 13 January 2016 is coming closer and closer. So if you haven’t already submitted your paper, keep this deadline in mind! Here are some warmly recommended sessions related to paleoseismology:

    1) NH5.7/GM12.6/SSP3.20 Geological records of extreme wave events (co-organized). Conveners: Ed Garrett, Jessica Pilarczyk, Max Engel, Dominik Brill, Simon Matthias May

    Even though I haven’t posted on this blog for years (sorry, Christoph…), I greatly appreciate the opportunity to advertise our session gathering all types of geological investigations, including both field studies and modelling approaches, which foster our understanding on tsunamis and high-magnitude storm surges. We welcome contributions on (i) sedimentary and geomorphological evidence of high-energy wave events from low and high energy environments, from low and high latitude regions and from coastal and offshore areas, (ii) novel dating approaches, (iii) numerical and experimental modelling studies of high-energy coastal sediment transport, and (iv) probabilistic tsunami hazard assessment based on geological data. more

  • Upcoming deadlines for INQUA2015 and Fucino2015

    January seems to be the month of deadlines. Abstracts for the EGU2015 must be submitted until 7 January and there are two more deadlines that paleoseismicity.org readers should consider: more

  • Paleoseismology at EGU2015

    The EGU2015 will be held from 12 – 17 April in Vienna, but the abstract deadline is much closer: Day after tomorrow, 7 January! So if you haven’t already done so, it’s time to have a look at paleoseismology-related sessions at EGU: more

  • Doggerland likely to have vanished due to the Storegga tsunami 8 ka ago

    “Doggerland” refers to a drowned landscape located where the North Sea stretches today. Fishermen have found numerous archaeological artifacts when fishing between the coasts of UK and Denmark/Germany (more or less), which led to the idea that an ancient culture lived in this area when the sea level was lower some thousands of years ago. Archaeological studies and modelling confirmed this hypothesis (e.g., see Coles, 2000 or see this paper with a really cool title: White, 2006). Slowly rising sea levels and/or land subsidence forced our ancestors to move to higher grounds and to finally give up Doggerland at all around 8 ka ago. Jon Hill and his co-authors now added some more spice to this story. At the EGU they presented modelling data which imply that the Storegga tsunami over-ran the remaining islands, and that the end of Doggerland was sudden. more

  • EGU – it’s already Thursday!

    What a week. I’ve seen loads and loads of interesting posters and met great people. more

  • EGU is coming up – and we are part of the blogroll!

    Europe’s biggest geoscience conference, the EGU General Assembly 2014, is approaching! Held in Vienna, Austria since about ten years by the European Geoscience Union, it brings together loads and loads of scientists from even more scientific fields. It’s great to present your work to your scientific community (because it’s likely they are there) but it might be even more suitable to meet new people, who give you helpful or even challenging input for your work! more

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