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  • Likelihood of primary surface faulting – spoiler of a PATA Days poster

    The Aix-en-Provence PATA Days are fast approaching and the meeting programme looks super-exciting! Unfortunately, I’ll not attend the congress, but my soul will be there in poster form – presenting author is 1st year PhD student Marco Pizza and the topic is the likelihood of primary surface faulting.

    Some earthquakes produce surface faulting, others do not. Several factors affect the outcome of this dichotomous variable (faulting YES/NO), including magnitude, depth, earthquake kinematic and local lithology. The probability of having surface rupture for a given magnitude is a key ingredient in Fault Displacement Hazard Assessment (FDHA). This probability is derived from empirical datasets and the state of the art is summarized in Figure 1, taken from the recently published IAEA Tecdoc on probabilistic FDHA.

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, active tectonics, and archaeoseismology (Sep 2022)

    This is the latest list of papers on paleoseismology and related fields. This time we have a lot of new studies on Eastern and Central Asia – very interesting reads! Enjoy reading and let me know if I have missed something.

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, active tectonics, and archaeoseismology (Aug 2022)

    Today we have a number of articles on fault physics and some papers that use novel or unconventional ways to address large earthquakes and their proxies. Enjoy reading!

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, active tectonics, and archaeoseismology (July 2022)

    This time I found a lot of studies on tsunamis, including a whole book on tsunamis that affected the Iberian Peninsula. Then there’s classical paleoseismology of course and tectonic geomorphology, but also some discussion on science communication and news about earthquakes in the European Alps. Enjoy reading!

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  • Trenching season is ongoing!

    Following an un-systematic post-dinner doomscrolling I’m happy to declare May 2022 as the trenchiest month ever. Here’s some exhibits:

    Safety first; if cozy and comfy it’s better.

    The award goes to Stéphane Baize (@Stef_EQ_Geology) and their trenches along the Cévennes fault: look at the details in the photo… like “paleo” engraved in the wooden frame to prevent collapse of the trench wall. And what about the tent? 10/10 professional style.

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    Landscape photography award

    The winner is Colca Canyon in Southern Peru, take a look at the pictures by Anderson Palomino (@AndersonRPT1) and Carlos Benavente (@clbenavente)

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    Best flower structure award

    No doubts here, easy win for Ian Pierce (@neotectonic) and their trenches in Azerbaijan. Follow him for stunning field photos and videos.

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    Mud club

    Mention goes to Jade Humprey (@ForFaultsSake).

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    The tricks of the trade.

    Learn them from Jonathan Obrist-Farner (@guateologist) uncovering the mysteries of the 1976 Motagua rupture in Guatemala

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    Category “You don’t need a trench to find good stratigraphy”.

    Prize goes to Gabriel Easton Vargas (@geastonvargas) and paleotsunami research in semiarid Chile

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    Category “Let’s the student do the work”.

    Terrific exhibit by Shreya Arora (@shryaarora) trenching in the Himalaya region

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    Never without a nijiri gama.

    Award is won by Sambit Prasanajit (@SPrasanajit) and their sites in S. Korea

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    Fancy fence

    The winner is PhD student Argelia Silva Fragoso (@Argy_sf) from Insubria university, digging trenches in Central Italy

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    Sorry if I missed someone, I wish you all a safe and fruitful field season!

  • New papers on paleoseismology, active tectonics, and archaeoseismology (May 2022)

    Our paper list is full of classic paleoseismic trenching studies from all over the world – fascinating to see how quickly the number of trenches is rising. We also have papers on tools & methodology, and on earthquake proxies that open new possibilities to study past large events. Don’t miss Ferrario et al. who compiled 15 years of research on earthquake environmental effects!

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  • Paleoseismology & the new Hungarian NPP Paks II

    Hungary plans to build a new nuclear power plant (NPP) at the banks of the Danube near Paks, where another NPP is already running for several decades. An interesting story is currently unfolding around the geological site conditions, and this story includes paleoseismology. In short, the Austrians and external experts argue the planned NPP Paks II will sit on a capable fault, while the Hungarians say there is a fault, but it can’t rupture the surface. Actually, it’s a bit more complicated…

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, active tectonics, and archaeoseismology (Mar 2022)

    These are the latest papers on paleoseismology, active tectonics, and archaeoseismology. Don’t forget to save the date for the Pata Days in France: 26-30 September, 2022. http://pata-days.org/

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, active tectonics, and archaeoseismology (Feb 2022)

    Here we are with the latest list of papers on paleoseismology and active tectonics, and we start with a surprise: A published paper on the 8 January 2022 Ms 6.9 Menyuan earthquake! A mere three weeks after the event, Yang et al. have already managed to get their rapid report accepted. Spoiler: It includes an offset animal footprint trace in snow! But there’s a lot of other interesting stuff in the list, too – check it out!

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  • New paper: Slip-Rate of the Main Kopeh Dagh Fault and active tectonics of the South Caspian

    The South Caspian Basin (SCB) is an aseismic block that moves independently to its surroundings. Together with the Arabia-Eurasia collision, it controls the active tectonics of Turkmenistan. The directions, rates, and rotation poles of the SCB relative to Iran and Eurasia are not well resolved. In a new paper recently published in TECTONICS, we constrain the motion of the SCB by measuring the slip rate of the Main Kopeh Dagh Fault (MKDF) in Turkmenistan. Here’s what we found:

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