• Chuck SimminsCC BY 2.0

    Upcoming tsunami conferences

    Several meetings on tsunamis will be held during the next months, make sure not to miss them. This year marks the 10th anniversary of the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami. This event was not only one of the most deadly natural disasters that ever happened, but it also was a kind of wake-up call for tsunami science. It’s safe to say that it had an enormous impact on research funding and it is responsible for a huge increase in scientific tsunami literature. The meetings will be a good occasion to share your research. more

  • An Indian Ocean tsunami triggered remotely by the onshore M7.7 earthquake in Balochistan, Pakistan, on 2013-09-24

    On 24 September, 2013, a magnitude 7.7 earthquake occurred in Balochistan, Pakistan. The quake caused intense ground motions and had dramatic consequences – hundreds of people died, and more than 100,000 lost their homes. A secondary effect which caught much attention in the international media was the birth of an island off the Pakistani coast – Zalzala Jazeera or Earthquake Island. Another effect which went almost completely unnoticed was a small tsunami in the Arabian Sea. The tsunami reached wave heights of around 1 m at the Omani coast. In a paper which was recently published in Geology, my colleagues and me document the tsunami effects in Oman. We conclude on a submarine slide off Pakistan as the likely trigger mechanism.

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  • By Lin Kristensen from New Jersey, USA (Timeless books)

    More papers to read during your holidays

    A good number of interesting papers has been published during the last months, related to active tectonics, paleoseismology and tsunami research. Study sites include Oman, Italy, New Zealand, California, Cascadia, Scotia Sea, and Central Asia. Enjoy reading and tell me, if you miss some publications here!

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  • Christoph Gruetzner

    Paleoseismological field work in Kazakhstan

    During the last three weeks I have been to Kazakhstan for paleoseismological field work and to summarize this journey: It was amazing! The trip was part of the Earthquakes without Frontiers project (EwF). This research project is funded by NERC and ESRC and aims on increasing the knowledge on earthquake hazards in Central Asia. The field work was lead by Richard Walker and scientists from Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, and the UK had a close look at fault scarps in the easternmost parts of the country. Our aim was to determine the slip rates of some of the longest and most prominent thrust and strike-slip faults in the area. more

  • Central European trenching goes on!

    This summer and fall will be trenching time, our Belgian, Dutch and Austrian colleagues are opening paleoseismological trenches. The DEM/image of the last post by Christoph shows already some morphological relevant faults in the Aachen area (recognized by the rectangular open-pit lignite mines) that are striking NW-SE. more

  • SRTM data/GlobalMapper

    New book: Intraplate Earthquakes

    Intraplate earthquakes are those that occur far away from plate boundaries in what is often also referred to as slowly deforming regions or stable continental regions (SCR). Seismicity there is comparably low and earthquake recurrence intervals can easily exceed thousands of years for individual faults. However, intraplate quakes do account for a significant number of earthquake fatalities and killed more people than those that happened at plate boundaries during the last 100 years (England & Jackson , 2011). A new book has been published a few days ago, dedicated to summarizing our knowledge of these seismic events.  more

  • Christoph GrütznerCC BY 3.0

    More papers on paleoseismology and active tectonics out now

    It’s not been long since I’ve listed some recent paleoseismology papers, but it seems like it’s publishing season. So here is more stuff to read during the holidays… more

  • Gösta Hoffmann

    Paleoseismicity.org relaunched

    Dear friends of paleoseismicity.org,

    we have relaunched our website a few days ago and I am very, very happy! Martin did a great job and basically built everything from scratch. The old website had grown over the years and became more and more complicated as we added new features every now and then. So we decided it’s time for something new and – voilà. more

  • Alexis O'ConnorCC BY 2.0

    The paleoseismicity newsletter

    Beside the Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google + channels, paleoseismicity.org now also provides a newsletter service.

    By subscribing to this newsletter you will find approximately every 4 weeks a condensed overview of everything what happened on the blog, what we shared on Facebook or Google +, about our favorite Tweets and everything what happens in the world of seismology and beyond.

    For subscribing  just click here or enter your email address on the right and you will get a confirmation email in a few seconds. After clicking the confirmation link everything is done. more

  • Delphine74CC BY SA 3.0

    New book on Earthquakes and Coseismic Surface Faulting in Iran

    A new book on paleoseismology, archaeoseismology and earthquakes on the Iranian Plateau has been published in the Developments in Earth Surface Processes series. Volume 17 is dedicated to Earthquakes and Coseismic Surface Faulting on the Iranian Plateau A Historical, Social and Physical Approach, and it is authored by Manuel Berberian. The book not only covers physical processes related to earthquakes in Iran like coseismic offsets, archaeoseismological effects, and geomorphological evidence, but its first part is all about Earthquake Hazard Warning in Oral Tradition and Literature on the Iranian Plateau. The volume comes with a foreword by Robert Yeats and Roger Bilham. Table of contents:

    more

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