3rd IGCP 639 meeting, 16-23 September, 2018 – Sea Level Change from Minutes to Millennia

The 3rd annual IGCP 639 meeting will take place from 16-23 September, 2018, in Italy. IGCP project 639 deals with Sea Level Change from Minutes to Millennia. The meeting will cover all IGCP related science such as sea level, climate change, tectonics, earthquakes, tsunami, and coastal inundation.
It’s a joint meeting with INQUA project CMP1701P “Late Quaternary record of coastal inundation due to earth surface deformation, tsunami and storms”, CMP1601P “HOLSEA” and CMP1603P “MOPP-MEDFLOOD”. Two days of scientific sessions at Taranto University will be followed by a four-day field trip to Catania. Continue reading “3rd IGCP 639 meeting, 16-23 September, 2018 – Sea Level Change from Minutes to Millennia”

EGU session “Paleoseismicity, active faulting, surface deformation, and the implications on seismic hazard assessment (Fault2SHA)”

Dear colleagues,

we wish you a Happy New Year and would like to advertise our session on “Paleoseismicity, active faulting, surface deformation, and the implications on seismic hazard assessment (Fault2SHA)” at the EGU General Assembly in Vienna (April 8-13, 2018). Please consider submitting an abstract before the deadline on Wednesday, 10 January 2018, 13:00 Central European Time. Please consider contributing with your studies by submitting your abstract here:

http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2018/session/27065
Continue reading “EGU session “Paleoseismicity, active faulting, surface deformation, and the implications on seismic hazard assessment (Fault2SHA)””

6th Int’l Colloquium Historical earthquakes & paleoseismology, 24-26 Oct, 2018, Han-sur-Lesse (BEL)

The 6th International Colloquium on Historical earthquakes & paleoseismology studies will be held from 24-25 October, 2018, in Han-sur-Lesse (Belgium). The meeting will focus on the contribution of paleoseismology/hist. seismology studies to the knowledge of the long-term seismic activity and to seismic hazard assessment.

On 26 October, 2018, a field trip will lead to the Han-sur-Lesse and Rochefort caves. The meeting will be organised by the Royal Observatory of Belgium. Continue reading “6th Int’l Colloquium Historical earthquakes & paleoseismology, 24-26 Oct, 2018, Han-sur-Lesse (BEL)”

Paleoseismology sessions at the LACSC/SSA Seismology of the Americas meeting, 14-17 May, 2018, Miami, FL

The 2018 SSA meeting was planned to take place in Puerto Rico in April as a joint meeting of the Latin American and Caribbean Seismological Commission (LACSC) and the Seismological Society of America (SSA). After hurricane Maria hit the island earlier this year, the decision was made to move to Miami, FL and to run the meeting from 14-17 May, 2018.
A number of exciting sessions will deal with active tectonics and paleoseismology:

Continue reading “Paleoseismology sessions at the LACSC/SSA Seismology of the Americas meeting, 14-17 May, 2018, Miami, FL”

Almaty sits on a huge active fault, and here is why we know

Almaty, the former capital of Kazakhstan and home to ~2 million people, is a rapidly growing, vibrant city, beautifully situated at the foothills of the mighty Zailisky Alatau, the northernmost mountain range of the Tien Shan at this longitude. The city sits on a huge alluvial fan with the snow-capped mountains in the background, reaching 5,000 m elevation. Almaty has suffered from earthquakes in its young history: in 1887, the Verny earthquake with a magnitude of about 7.3 had its epicentre a few kilometres west of the city but did not produce surface ruptures (Verny is the old name of Almaty). Only two years later, the M8 Chilik earthquake ruptured the surface 100 km to the southeast of Almaty. Finally, Almaty was heavily damaged by the 1911 Chon Kemin earthquake with a magnitude of ~8, which occurred on the southern flank of the Zailisky Alatau. In our new paper we now report on a fault that did not rupture in historical times, but surely did so in the Holocene – and this fault is right beneath the city. Continue reading “Almaty sits on a huge active fault, and here is why we know”

Those were the PATA Days in New Zealand

More than 130 participants from 21 different countries, about one third of which ECRs and/or DCRs, participated in the 8th PATA Days in New Zealand. The meeting started with an icebreaker on 12 November, followed by a field trip on 13 November to visit the northern surface ruptures of the M7.8 earthquake of November 2016. After that, three days were devoted to scientific presentations, poster sessions, and discussion. A public lecture by Phaedra Upton, Daniela Pantosti, Ursula Cochran, Caroline Orchiston, and Tom Rockwell attracted a large number of Blenheim residents. Continue reading “Those were the PATA Days in New Zealand”