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  • New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Mar 2016)

    It’s only one month since my last paper update and yet I have nineteen interesting new studies for you. Today’s round-up includes tsunamis, tectonic geomorphology, environmental earthquake effects and soft sediment deformation, new techniques/technology, and some classic paleoseismology. Enjoy! more

  • Guest blog by Bastian Schneider (RWTH Aachen University): Tsunami hazard in Muscat, Oman

    Tsunamis are a very real threat in the Indian Ocean. Most people will immediately think of the 2004 tsunami and the Sumatra subduction zone, but the Arabian Sea has seen strong tsunamis in the past, too. In 1945, a major earthquake at the Makran Subduction Zone caused a large tsunami (Hoffmann et al., 2013a). In 2013, the on-shore Balochistan earthquake caused a submarine slide which in turn triggered a tsunami that reached the coast of Oman (Heidarzadeh & Satake, 2014; Hoffmann et al., 2014a). There is also evidence for paleotsunamis along Oman’s coast (Hoffmann et al., 2013b; Hoffmann et al., 2014b). Now a team of scientists from RWTH Aachen University (Germany) and GUtech (Muscat, Oman) have published a tsunami inundation scenario for Muscat (Schneider et al., 2016). This is lead author Bastian Schneider’s guest blog on this research: more

  • New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Feb 2016)

    Here’s the February edition of my paper recommendations. This time we have:

    • Paleoseismology in Germany and Nepal (the latter with a focus on charcoal dating techniques),
    • Tsunamis in Greece, Portugal, Israel and Alaska,
    • Turbidites in Portugal,
    • New insights into the geodynamics of Mozambique,
    • Fault rheology in Iran,
    • Rupture jumps on strike‐slip faults, and
    • A MATLAB tool for seismic hazard calculations.

    Enjoy!

    more

  • Paleoseismology & active tectonics sessions at the IASPEI-LACSC meeting 20-22 June, 2016, San Jose, Costa Rica

    From 20-22 June, 2016, the IASPEI – Regional Assembly of the Latin-American and Caribbean Seismological Commission – LACSC will  be held in San Jose, Costa Rica. There will be some very interesting sessions on active tectonics, paleoseismology, seismic hazard, and intraplate faults: more

  • Paleoseismology & Tsunami papers – Christmas edition

    This is this year’s last issue of my paper round-up, and it includes some pretty interesting stuff. Our Greek colleagues published a report on the liquefaction caused by the 2014 Lefkada earthquakes, just in time with the recent earthquake that hit more or less the same area again (Papathanassiou et al., and see earlier posts here). Long et al. published a paper on iceberg-induced tsunamis, found in the sedimentary record – that’s a great story, isn’t it? Jacobson’s PhD on the Lake Heron Fault (NZ) is an interesting read, and Iván Sunyol’s paper on paleoseismological trenches in Mexico is especially interesting for those who attended the 2012 Morelia meeting. Zhou et al. come up with a great dataset of Pléiades imagery from the El Mayor-Cucapah Quake, Calais et al. have a close look on the northeastern Caribbean, and finally, Kufner et al.’s paper is about the collision between India and Asia deep below the Pamir and Hindu Kush.

    Enjoy reading and Merry Christmas!

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  • My top ten list of earthquake blogs

    I am running this blog for more than five years now and it is time to acknowledge the other geo-blogs out there that have inspired me. In order to stay updated I follow the Geobulletin, which monitors the geoblogosphere activity. There are numerous amazing blogs out there that are either fun to read or interesting or both, but here I will focus on the ones dealing with earthquakes/tectonics/geomorphology/tsunamis. Here is my personal, subjective, but honest, list of earthquake blogs that I like and read: more

  • New papers to read during the holidays

    A couple of interesting papers were published since my last round-up, including work on paleoseismology, tsunamis, measuring offsets, and boulder transport by storms. Enjoy reading! more

  • Earthquake Geology sessions at the 16 World Conference on Earthquake Engineering, Chile, 2017

    The 16 World Conference on Earthquake Engineering will be held from 9-13 January, 2017, in Santiago de Chile. Note that the deadline for short abstracts submission is 23 November, 2015! Abstracts can be submitted via this link.

    This meeting comes with a number of sessions which are interesting for earthquake geologists, paleoseismologists and those of us who deal with seismic hazard assessments. Among them: more

  • New papers on paleoseismology, tsunamis, and the Gorkha Earthquake

    A few days ago, SRL published a special issue on the Gorkha earthquakes with lots of interesting papers. I especially like the work of Angster et al. with their impressive photos of the earthquake ground effects. Make sure to download the electronic supplement to this article!

    Besides this special issue, a good number of other interesting papers have been published recently on paleoseismicity, active tectonics, seismic hazard, and tsunamis. Among them is Andi’s work on the Ejina basin and Serva et al. with a introduction of using the ESI scale for earthquake hazard assessments. Enjoy reading! more

  • New papers on Paleoseismology and Geoethics

    Several new studies have been published recently on old earthquakes and their geological footprint – time to list them and to recommend reading. Additionally, today’s paper digest also lists several articles which are not about paleoseismology, but geoethics. These papers were published in a special volume of GSL. They cover subjects that many paleoseismologists will have dealt with in the past or are likely to deal with in the future  – seismic risk perception, science communication, public outreach, and communicating uncertainties. One paper is dedicated to the L’Aquila trial. I find it very telling that this issue is not open access. Obviously, strengthening “public trust in geosciences” has still a long way to go…

    Here are the latest papers:

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