• Philipp Balling

    28–17 Ma old uplifted marine terraces in the Dinarides

    In 2018, back then when we didn’t even knew about Covid-19, I was sitting in a little restaurant in Slovenia with my happy field team. We were exhausted from another long day of geophysical surveys for our active tectonics project and quite thirsty. A colleague of mine, Philipp Balling, had just finished his field work in Croatia and was on his way north to join us for a few days before he would continue to Jena. He arrived late that evening and we had a great time catching up with each others stories from the field. He showed me a few photos, one of them displaying a huge, flat area at the Croatian coast. I was immediately alerted and asked if the Croatian coast was uplifting, because this thing looked like a marine abrasion platform to me. We chatted about uplifted marine terraces until long after midnight, and this is how the story of this paper began.

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  • Postdoc position in Upper Plate Deformation at UNAM, Mexico City

    The following open position might be of interest to the Active tectonics and
    Paleoseismology community:

    UNAM is seeking a Postdoctoral Research Assistant for a 12 month fixed term appointment working on the exciting UNAM-CONACYT-funded project on “Spatial and Temporal Variations of Upper Plate Deformation across the Guerrero portion of the Mexican Subduction Zone” at the Institute of Geography and the Tsunami and Paleoseismology Laboratory, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), Mexico City Campus. The candidate will pursue fundamental and applied research into the assessment of both temporal and spatial vertical crustal deformation associated with both slow (interseismic) and rapid (coseismic) crustal deformation across the inner forearc region of the central Mexican subduction zone on the Guerrero sector, where the Cocos plate underthrusts the North American plate. The candidate will be responsible for the development and execution of laboratory and field research, conduct studies to develop a model of long-term deformation, coseismic deformation and earthquake/tsunami chronology, writing reports and papers.

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  • 古地震学: “Paleoseismology” by Jim McCalpin now available in Chinese

    Jim McCalpin’s famous “Paleoseismology” is now also available in Chinese. The book was translated by Xu Yueren, Li Wenqiao, and Du Peng.

    By the way, “Палеосейсмология” is also available in Russian: https://www.livelib.ru/book/1001089368-paleosejsmologiya-komplekt-iz-2-knig-cd

  • Christoph GrütznerCC BY-SA 3.0

    Earthquake geology & active tectonics sessions at vEGU21

    This year’s EGU will be held from 19-30 April. It will be another virtual conference, which is why it’s named vEGU21. Anyway, there are many interesting sessions, and a couple of them could be very interesting for paleoseismologists, earthquake geologists, and active tectonics aficionados. For example, EDITH is also a project of INQUA‘s TERPRO commission.

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  • Christoph GrütznerCC BY-SA 3.0

    New papers on paleoseismology, earthquakes, and active tectonics (Jan 2021)

    Some colleagues told me that 2020 was the most productive year they ever had – without the distraction of field work and meetings they managed to write up a lot of things they’ve had on their desks. Others reported exactly the opposite. In any case, I hope that this year life will go back to normal and I wish you a wonderful 2021.
    Here are the latest papers, quite a good start into the next decade. Stay safe!

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  • This was the virtual PATA short meeting 2020

    On 18 December we held a short virtual PATA meeting, since the in-person meeting to be held in Chile had to be postponed to 2021. The PATA Days (Paleoseismology, Active Tectonics, Archaeoseismology) are the main event of INQUA TERPRO‘s earthquake science community, led by the project TPPT (Terrestrial Processes Perturbed by Tectonics). Most of us are starving for joint field trips and personal contacts, but it was nice to at least see everyone online – more than 170 people attended the 1.5 hrs event. The five main topics were:

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  • Several PhD, postdoc, and professorship opportunities in active tectonics (and related fields)

    Finally some good news – several job opportunities in active tectonics and related fields are currently being advertised. See the list below. Stay safe and have a great 2021!

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  • How to access the PATADays virtual meeting, Dec. 18, 2020

    While the real PATA Days in Chile have been postponed to 2021, we will run a short virtual meeting on Dec 18, 2020 in order to keep the spirit alive. Here’s how to take part:

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  • New book: Tsunamiites (2nd Edition) Features and Implications

    The 2nd edition of “Tsunamiites – Features and Implications” has just been published by Elsevier. It collects 21 chapters on the sedimentology of tsunamis, written by a team of international scientists. The new edition (1st edition was published in 2008) also includes lessons learned from recent events such as the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami. The 482-pages book was edited by Tsunemasa Shiki, Yoshinobu Tsuji, Teiji Yamazaki, and Futoshi Nanayama.

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  • Soft-sediment deformations buried beneath the center of the Dead Sea record hundreds of large earthquakes spanning the past 220,000 years

    1. Key points

    This is the first attempt to apply a computational fluid dynamic modeling-based quantitative “fossil seismograph” to develop a large earthquake record.

    The record is calibrated to historic earthquakes, for which the Dead Sea area has a famously long span, and it confirms a clustered earthquake recurrence pattern and a group-fault temporal clustering model.

    The record yields much shorter mean recurrence for large (≤ 1.4 kyr vs. 7-11 kyr) and moderate (≤ 500 yr vs. 1600 yr) earthquakes than previously obtained, thus reveals a much higher seismic hazard than previously appreciated on this slow-slipping plate boundary.

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