Report: Coseismic Effects of the 21 August 2017 Isola di Ischia Earthquake

On 21 August an MD4.0 earthquake hit the Island of Ischia, Italy. The event occurred at a depth of only ~2 km. Despite the low magnitude, the earthquake had dramatic consequences, and two people were killed by collapsing houses. The INGV EMERGEO working group and CNR-IAMC have now published a report on the coseismic effects of this earthquake, which include ground cracks and mass movements. The full report can be found at earthquakegeology.com or downloaded as a pdf here (3.15 MB).

Please cite the report as: EMERGEO Working Group, Nappi et al. (2017). The august 21, 2017 Isola di Ischia (Casamicciola) earthquake: Coseismic effects, doi:10.5281/zenodo.1003188

Report on the Camerino 2017 INQUA Field Trip to the Central Apennine fault system

Report on the International Field Trip “From 1997 to 2016: three destructive earthquakes along the Central Apennine fault system”, 19th-22nd July 2017, Italy

Website: http://convegni.unicam.it/TDEq_centralItaly ( including program and abstracts, field trip guidebook and list of participants)

Authors: Chiara Frigerio1, Alessandro Maria Michetti1, Francesca Ferrario1, Franz Livio1, Emanuele Tondi2

1Università dell’Insubria, Dipartimento di Scienza ed Alta Tecnologia, Como, Italia

2Università di Camerino, Sezione di Geologia, Scuola di Scienze e Tecnologie, Italia Continue reading “Report on the Camerino 2017 INQUA Field Trip to the Central Apennine fault system”

Paper: Using georadar and a mobile geoelectrics device to map shallow sediment distribution on a large scale

[UPDATE 2017-05-14: The links now lead to the free version of the paper, available until 30 June.]

Together with my colleagues I have published a new paper in which we describe a methodology for mapping the shallow architecture of large sedimentary basins with minimum effort and high resolution. We use two geophysical methods and combine them with point information from shallow drillings to identify different types of alluvial, fluvial, and aeolian sediments in the Orkhon Valley in Mongolia. We then show that our results fit well with a remote sensing approach. Although we did not target active faults in our study, the methodology is well suitable for detecting deformed/offset sediments without surface expression due to high erosion or sedimentation rates. That’s why I feel the study is of interest for the fault-hunting community. Continue reading “Paper: Using georadar and a mobile geoelectrics device to map shallow sediment distribution on a large scale”

Active faults around Cusco (Perú): field work on paleoseismology and archaeoseismology for project Cusco-PATA

The city of Cusco in Perú has been hit by damaging earthquakes several times in its long history. In Inka times a strong earthquake destroyed parts of the city, and the Spanish invaders documented an earthquake that happened in 1650. Three hundred years later, in 1950, an earthquake destroyed large parts of modern Cusco and in 1986 a M6.1 event also led to damages in the city. In order to better understand the active normal faulting in the region, INGEMMET has launched the project Cusco-PATA (Paleoseismology, Archaeoseismology and Active Tectonics – “pata” also means “scarp” in Quechua). The project brings together scientists from Perú, Spain, France, and the UK. The 2017 field campaign started in mid-April with work on the archaeological sites in and around Cusco and paleoseismological trenching of the Pachatusan Fault. Continue reading “Active faults around Cusco (Perú): field work on paleoseismology and archaeoseismology for project Cusco-PATA”

Short Course in Structural Geology and Tectonics of Hokkaido

An interesting post-grad student training course will be held from 26 June – 7 July, 2017, at Hokkaido University:
Structural Geology and Tectonics of Hokkaido: Geometric principles, and the relationship between active and ancient deformation.
During this course you will learn how geologic structures, developed from microscopic to map scale, reflect the rates, directions, and mechanics of past and contemporary plate tectonics and deformation. You will also hone your three-dimensional perception and skills through practical applications.

Continue reading “Short Course in Structural Geology and Tectonics of Hokkaido”

Studying the earthquake geology of the Chilik-Chon Kemin Fault Zone in Kazakhstan

The Chilik-Chon Kemin Fault Zone is a major left-lateral strike-slip fault zone in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan, just a few tens of kilometres east of Almaty and north of Lake Issyk Kul. It has seen one of the largest continental earthquakes ever recorded in 1889, with an estimated magnitude of ~M8.3. In July and August I had the chance to visit this fault zone for two weeks together with Angela Landgraf from Potsdam and Aidyn Mukambaev from the National Data Centre, thanks to a travel grant from COMET (thanks so much, COMET!) and with support from the EwF Project. We wanted to find out more details about the tectonic geomorphology of this fault zone and we wanted to study the slip rate and earthquake recurrence intervals. So we took our drone, shovels and picks and set off for a field trip into the mountainous wilderness. Since I will leave for another field trip to Kazakhstan (Dzhungarian Fault) tomorrow, I will leave you with some impressions from our field work and provide more information once the paper is published…
Enjoy!  Continue reading “Studying the earthquake geology of the Chilik-Chon Kemin Fault Zone in Kazakhstan”

Guest blog by Javier Escartín (IPGP) & Frédérique Leclerc (EOS): Studying coseismic deformation along submarine faults

The geometry, length, and displacement of fault ruptures that breach the surface provide critical information on the behavior of faults during seismic events (coseismic deformation), and on their long-term behavior. The study of coseismic fault ruptures has concentrated almost exclusively along continental faults, while submarine studies have been scarce, and only a few provided quantitative constraints in parameters such as fault displacement (e.g., Tohoku Earthquake). In addition to represent more than two thirds of the Earth’s seismicity, submarine faults can also be associated with tsunamis, potentially increasing the seismic hazard that these structures pose.

Continue reading “Guest blog by Javier Escartín (IPGP) & Frédérique Leclerc (EOS): Studying coseismic deformation along submarine faults”

New papers on paleoseismology in the Tien Shan

Between 1885 and 1938, the northern Tien Shan at the border between present Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan experienced a remarkable series of five major earthquakes, exceeding M6.9 and reaching up to M ~ 8 (1885 Belovodskoe M6.9, 1887 Verny M7.3, 1889 Chilik M~8, 1911 Chon Kemin M8, and 1938 Kemino Chu M6.9). Combined, the seismic moments add up to almost moment magnitude 9, which is a significant amount of strain released in roughly 50 years and across an E-W stretch of less than 500 kilometers. Even more intriguing is the fact that the ruptured region is located more than thousand km north of the nearest plate boundary and associated India-Eurasia collision zone. The macroseismic areas of these earthquakes include the present-day capital of Kyrgyzstan, Bishkek (Frunze) and the former capital and still largest city of Kazakhstan, Almaty (earlier names Alma Ata and Verny).
Continue reading “New papers on paleoseismology in the Tien Shan”

Guest blog by Sascha Schneiderwind (RWTH Aachen University): Multiparametric trenching investigations

[Update 15 February 2017: Since Sascha is an author here now, the post was attributed to him.]
Greece is one of the main targets of RWTH Aachen’s Neotectonics & Geohazards group. They worked on paleo-tsunamis, active faults on the Peloponnese, in Attica, and on Crete, and on the application of terrestrial LiDAR and shallow geophysics for active tectonics research. In their latest paper, Sascha Schneiderwind et al. developed a methodology to aid paleoseismic trenching studies. They use t-LiDAR and georadar to better and more objectively characterise lithological units. His paper includes nice examples from Crete and from the famous Kaparelli Fault. Here is his guest blog: Continue reading “Guest blog by Sascha Schneiderwind (RWTH Aachen University): Multiparametric trenching investigations”