Christoph Grützner

Christoph Grützner

works at the Institute of Geological Sciences, Jena University. He likes Central Asia and the Mediterranean and looks for ancient earthquakes.

  • Where on Google Earth? WoGE #271

    I have won my first WoGE on Friday, Florian had a great image of the Okavango delta in Botswana. So I have the great pleasure to host the actual quiz.  The rules are simple: Find out the position of the image placed below (provide coordinates) and give a short description of the geological features in the comments. The first to find out has the honor to host the next quiz on his (geo-) blog. I do not invoke the “Schott rule” since I chose to show only a small detail of the subject of interest. This means: Let the games begin! more

  • What’s up? The Friday links (8)

    The Christchurch earthquake was the main topic of the Geoblogosphere this week. A great analysis on the effects was provided by Dave Petley in his Landslide Blog. Highly Allochthonous reasoned on seismic lensing, Ontario Geofish posted a lot on building security, and countless news sites came up with photos and reports. Frank Taylor, who hosted the GoogleEarthBlog before he left for a sailing trip around the world, was in Christchurch next to the Cathedral when the quake happened. On his Tahina Expedition website he reports on his experiences.

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  • Why was the Christchurch earthquake so devastating?

    A M6.3 earthquake hit Christchurch, New Zealand on 22 February (21 Feb in UTC), leaving at least 75 people dead and hundreds injured or missing. Hundreds of houses were destroyed, including the Christchurch Cathedral, and damages will probably sum up to some billion dollars. On 4 September 2010 (3 Sept in UTC), a M7.0 event struck Christchurch, but then no one was killed. So: what’s the difference between the two events?

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  • Searching for Records of Past Earthquakes Under Water

    In its latest issue, EOS reports on the European Science Foundation conference “Submarine Paleoseismology – The Offshore Search of Large Holocene Earthquakes” which was held in Obergurgl, Austria from 11-16 September 2010.

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  • What’s up? The Friday links (5).

    The Accredtionary Wedge #30 blog carnival hosted by Mountain Beltway came up with a tasting idea in January: The Geological Bake Sale. Explore and enjoy thematic food like the moon surface cake, the pillow lava bread and the debris flow vegetables. If you create a sweet fault or a tasty trench, we promise to publish it on paleoseismicity.org.  more

  • Oxford University Press Book Sale

    Oxford University Press is currently selling selected books with up to 75% off. The promotion covers dozens of books, among them titles on Archeology, GIS and Geography.

    Most titles are related to human sciences, but there might be something interesting for paleoseismologists and earthquake geologists, too. more

  • What’s up? The Friday links (4)

    The California Geological Survey provides a great online-tool for geoscientist: A fault map of California (Alquist-Priolo-Fault-Zone with all datasets available in PDF and GIS format for free! Start here.

    A volunteer panel that assesses earthquake risks in Utah said it examined nearly 130 school buildings in the state and found more than half fail to meet federal earthquake safety guidelines. Bad news from here.

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  • Job Openings: Five research geologists, tectonics for USGS Alaska

    The Alaska Science Center is advertising five new permanent research geologist positions.  Applications are open between December 1, 2010 and February 15, 2011, and that selection will occur during late spring of 2011. More information on their homepage, including the following announcement:

    “This hiring initiative inaugurates a team approach to geologic research in Alaska (Photo gallery). The five positions will together make up a working group that will respond to the USGS’ ongoing need for research in framework geology of the 49th state.  Project work is expected to support a broad range of research topics related to crustal evolution and surficial processes.  We expect projects will involve collaboration with researchers from other USGS offices, federal agencies, state agencies, and academia.
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  • IWAGPR2011 Deadline extended to 28 February

    The deadline of the International Workshop on Advanced Ground Penetrating Radar (IWAGPR) to be held in Aachen, June 2011 has been extended to 28 February:

    “Dear Colleagues,

    Due to many requests for extension, we have extended the deadline for submitting an extended abstract (camera ready paper, 4-6 pages) for IWAGPR2011 to February 28, 2011.
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  • What’s up? The Friday links (3)

    The L’Aquila earthquake from 6 April, 2009 caused more than 308 fatalities and destroyed about 15,000 buildings. A new initiative set up by the British architect Barnaby Gunning aims on creating a 3D model of the destroyed city in its present state with SketchUp for GoogleEarth. The model will be used for “creating a valuable resourcef for masterplanning the reconstruction”, Gunning states on the project’s homepage. more

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