Christoph Grützner

Christoph Grützner

works at the Institute of Geological Sciences, Jena University. He likes Central Asia and the Mediterranean and looks for ancient earthquakes.

  • What’s up? The Friday links (28)

    The University of Oklahoma has set up a “Global Geo-Referenced Field Photo Library“. Once registered, users may upload and geotag their (geological) field photos. Additionally, you can provide information on the geology/geomorphology. This could become a nice database if more people start uploading their images. Imagine you have a braided river system and you can compare different years and seasons. It’s up to you if you want to make your pictures public or if you prefer to keep them private.

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  • Job offer: Assistant professor position available at UNAM

    Job Description

    The Geosciences Center at the National Autonomous University of Mexico invites applications for Assistant Professor/Researcher Position with expertise in Paleoseismology and Neotectonics. Applicants are required to have a PhD, basic knowledge of Spanish (no fluency is needed), and expertise in field-based Paleoseismology or closely related fields. Applicants with some experience in Landslides effects and evaluation are particularly encouraged.

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  • What’s up? The Friday links (27)

    Recently, scientists from Switzerland came up with the news that fractured bedrock might amplify earthquake shaking. The say they observed an increase by factor 10, which seems huge. I knew amplifying by sediment basins, but this is new to me.

    100 years ago on 6 January, Alfred Wegener presented his continental drift theory for the first time. The Blogosphere was full with articles, among them: more

  • Where on GoogleEarth? WoGE #327

    Matthew chose to take us to the Baikal Rift with his WoGE #326. The Olkhon island is almost as large as Madeira and has some fascinating tectonic features, thanks again for pointing me to that great spot, Matthew! Now it’s time for a new challenge. Find the following feature on GoogleEarth, post the location and a brief description of the geology in the comments, and all the fame will be yours. more

  • On the rocks – how to cool Whiskey adequately

    Today’s post is about Whiskey. And Whisky. More precisely, about how to cool it adequately as a geoscientist. I received a great Christmas gift from Andreas – ice cubes made up of “Nordic Rocks”. The manufacturer promises a perfect way of cooling drinks by adding one to three pieces of 400 million year old swedish bedrock. No thinning of the drink, no pollution. more

  • Sunday Geology Picture: Alkyonides Gulf, Greece

    This beautiful, isolated rock stands in the Alkyonides Gulf, the northwestern part of the Gulf of Corinth. It has some beautiful notches, which indicate recent uplift. It is situated right on the footwall of an active fault, which was activated during the 1981 earthquake sequence. It is not so easy to use those notches as sea level indicators or for measuring tectonic movements if both effects have to be taken into account. The fault has a huge throw and a beautiful scarp (limestone) with lots of slickensides. One of my favourite places in Greece. Well, the entire Perachora peninsula is worth a visit – an earthquake geologist’s Disney Land!

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  • Saturday Geology Picture: Delphi, Greece

    Delphi is one of the most impressive places I’ve ever seen. The landscape is just breathtaking – the archaeological site is situated on the southern flank of the Parnassus Mountains, dominating the entire valley. You can see the Gulf of Corinth right from the temples, and due to the steep slope you feel like Delphi is built on many floors with the stadium being the roof. The oracle might be related to faults under the temple; some authors speculate that gas vents (ethane?) caused hallucinations of the priest, which were interpreted as the oracle. Another nice thing is that you can see the archaeoseismological damage from strong historical earthquakes everywhere – cracks, rotated and tilted walls, corner break-outs, dropped keystones in arches and so on. more

  • What’s up? The Friday links (26)

    Today is the 200th anniversary of the first event of the New Madrid Earthquake Series. There’s still an open debate on magnitudes, intensities, causative faults, recurrence intervalls and the implication for seismic hazard. Several websites and blogs have nice posts, among them:

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  • Friday Geology Picture: Canyonlands National Park, Utah, at night

    In Evelyn’s one-picture-per-day-to-save-some-time-before-Christmas-series, my contribution today is from the Canyonlands, Utah. It’s a view to the north from Needles Outpost campsite, directly at the boarder of the National Park. The reddish sandstones give a beautiful contrast to the dark-blue sky. The picture was taken during the night, there were always that incredible view and millions of stars. No comparison to light-polluted Germany!  The tents, which have been our home for three weeks, were completely messed with the ubiquitous red dust after that three weeks… more

  • Thursday Geology Picture: Iron-nickel mine in Albania

    I took this picture in an iron-nickel mine in Albania. Here we see the contact between the underlying ultramafics and the carbonates on top. The fluids circulated in the mafics and the iron-nickel ores are trapped at the lithological boundary. The ore is shiny green and occurs in hundreds of small bands in a small area along the contact only. I love this picture because the contact is so sharp. A fault zone nearby bears very beautiful conglomerates which I always wanted to have for my bathroom…

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