Posts in the category »   «  ( 122 Posts )

  • From coastal earthquake geology and semi-automated feature detection

    In microtidal seas such as the Mediterranean (tidal range ≈0.4 m sea-level indicators are commonly used to infer coseismic history. A list containing these indicators is long, including wave-cut platforms, marine terraces, displaced beach rock, biological agents, sedimentological and stratigraphical indicators, and archaeological indicators. Obviously, the trustworthiness varies a lot from one to another. For deriving late Holocene coastal tectonic activity, one of the most commonly used sea-level marker activity are tidal notches. These form distinct morphological and ecological erosional features developed within the tidal range [Pirazzoli, 1986; Antonioli et al., 2015]. more

  • Why it’s a bad idea to build on an alluvial fan

    During December, Greece has suffered from heavy rains and severe flooding. The following video shows a church near the town of Schinos (Skinos), which has been seriously affected by flooding and sedimentation. Many geology students and many paleoseismologists will find the church looking familiar, and I will explain why: more

  • New video: 2012 INQUA workshop on Paleoseismology, Archeoseismology and Active Tectonics in Morelia, Mexico

    Last year the 3rd INQUA – IGCP567 Workshop on Paleoseismology, Archeoseismology and Active Tectonics took place in November in Morelia, Mexico. It was a great meeting and I have already posted a lot of photos here, here, here, here, and here. Now I have found the time to look at the video clips that I made. I’ve prepared a short movie with the highlights of the conference. You see, you must not miss the upcoming conference in Aachenmore

  • Sunday Geology Picture: Alkyonides Gulf, Greece

    This beautiful, isolated rock stands in the Alkyonides Gulf, the northwestern part of the Gulf of Corinth. It has some beautiful notches, which indicate recent uplift. It is situated right on the footwall of an active fault, which was activated during the 1981 earthquake sequence. It is not so easy to use those notches as sea level indicators or for measuring tectonic movements if both effects have to be taken into account. The fault has a huge throw and a beautiful scarp (limestone) with lots of slickensides. One of my favourite places in Greece. Well, the entire Perachora peninsula is worth a visit – an earthquake geologist’s Disney Land!

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  • Corinth2011 aftermath

    Dear participants,

    hopefully, everybody has returned well and everybody enjoyed the meeting,
    we have received a lot of mails and the feedback is fantastic. THANK YOU!

    The updated abstract volume will be ready for download soon. You will receive an extra mail with the link or can just visit paleoseismicity.org.

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  • 2nd day of the Corinth2011 meeting

    9:00 The second day started with a great keynote, Chris Scholz talked about earthquake triggering and fault synchronization with examples from California and Iceland.

    09:45 Next great keynote: Clark Burchfiel on the Wenchuan EQ!

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  • A few words about the upcoming Corinth Workshop

    After the very successful 1st Workshop on Earthquake Archaeology and Paleoseismology held in the ancient roman site of Baelo Claudia (Spain, 2009), the INQUA Focus Group on Paleoseismology and Active Tectonics decided to elaborate a bi-annual calendar to support this joint initiative with the IGCP-567 “Earthquake Archaeology”. This second joint meeting moved to the eastern Mediterranean, a tectonically active setting within the Africa-Eurasia collision zone and located in the origins of the pioneer’s works on archaeoseismology. However, for the coming year 2012, at least a part of us will move also to the New World, where the 3rd INQUA-IGCP 567 international workshop will take place in Morelia, Mexico in November 2012. It is planned to proceed with the meeting, so we are thinking of Aachen, Germany, to be the host in 2013, possibly together with Louvain, Belgium.

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  • What’s up? The Friday links (15)

    The most exciting news this week surely were the media reports that a tsunami destroyed ancient Olympia in Greece, hundreds of years ago. Andreas Vött from Mainz University published a press release at the end of June about his research. Unfortunately, I have only found media coverage in German. The results will be presented at the Corinth2011 conference (registration still open)! more

  • Corinth2011 – Registration re-opened, 20 places left!

    Dear colleagues and friends,

    the registration for the Corinth2011 workshop is open again. Due to additional capacities at the conference venue we can offer 20 more places! You can register via the paleoseismicity.org website. However, the abstract submission is closed. Don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions.

    Have a nice weekend and looking forward to seeing you in Corinth,

    The Organization Committee

  • Happy holidays and a happy 2011!

    Paleoseismicity.org wishes you happy holidays and a happy new year! Be aware of snow avalanches and don’t get stuck in the winter traffic!

    We are looking forward to seeing you in warm and sunny Corinth.

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