Posts in the category »   «  ( 8 Posts )

  • 5th PATA Days in Busan – registration deadline extended to 20 June

    Dear friends and colleagues,

    The deadline for registration of the 5th PATA-days meeting is extended to June 20, and for abstract submission to the end of June.  

    The 5th International INQUA Meeting on Paleoseismology, Active Tectonics and Archeoseismology (PATA Days) will take place in Busan, Korea from 21-27 September 2014. Already some 75 scientists from all around the world have registered for this meeting – be the next one and don’t miss the latest news on old earthquakes.

    See details on the official website: www.pata-days.org.

    Please don’t miss the last chance to visit dynamic Korea!

      more

  • A Mw6.9 earthquake in the Aegean Sea

    Today (2014-05-24) on 09:25 UTC an earthquake with magnitude MW6.9 occurred in the NE Aegean Sea. The EMSC reports a depth of 27 km (USGS: 10 km). The quake had a (right-lateral) strike-slip mechanism and was felt as far away as Athens, Istanbul, and Sofia. More than 200 people were injured, most of them only lightly, and moderate damage to dozens of houses has been reported. The earthquake occurred on the (S)Western part of the North Anatolian Fault in the Samos Basin and was among the strongest events that have ever been recorded at that segment. more

  • Field trip: Alaska 1964 earthquake and tsunami

    The SSA 2014 conference in Anchorage, Alaska is over and so is the post-meeting excursion. Our friend and colleague Gösta was attending this field trip on the environmental effects of the Great Alaska Earthquake of 1964 and he sent us some nice images and a brief description of this trip. This is the second part of his report. more

  • A paleoseismicity-spy and desert geologist in Alaska

    The SSA2014 annual meeting took place in Anchorage, Alaska from 29 April – 2 May. Currently the post-meeting excursion on the effects of the Great Alaska Earthquake of 1964 is taking place, and we placed our paleoseismicity-spy Gösta Hoffmann in the group. We hope that no one realizes that he’s a desert geologist and absolutely in the wrong place, but he promised to not wear his Teva sandals in order not be identified. Gösta is Associate Professor at the German University of Technology in Oman (GUtech) and works on coastal change and tsunamis, and particularly on tsunamis in the Arabian Sea. Here is his report from Alaska: more

  • Doggerland likely to have vanished due to the Storegga tsunami 8 ka ago

    “Doggerland” refers to a drowned landscape located where the North Sea stretches today. Fishermen have found numerous archaeological artifacts when fishing between the coasts of UK and Denmark/Germany (more or less), which led to the idea that an ancient culture lived in this area when the sea level was lower some thousands of years ago. Archaeological studies and modelling confirmed this hypothesis (e.g., see Coles, 2000 or see this paper with a really cool title: White, 2006). Slowly rising sea levels and/or land subsidence forced our ancestors to move to higher grounds and to finally give up Doggerland at all around 8 ka ago. Jon Hill and his co-authors now added some more spice to this story. At the EGU they presented modelling data which imply that the Storegga tsunami over-ran the remaining islands, and that the end of Doggerland was sudden. more

  • A reviewed tsunami database for Australia

    I still try to catch up with all the amazing new stories on earthquakes, tsunamis and paleoseismology that made it to the media last week. Here is #2 on a reviewed tsunami database for Australia.  more

  • Tsunami hazard in Israel

    A lot of interesting stories on earthquakes, tsunamis and paleoseismology made it to the media last week – no wonder as the EGU2014 and the SSA meeting took place at the same time. I will try to catch up and I start with tsunami hazard in Israel:

    more

  • New papers on tsunamis, archeoseismology, paleoseismology, seismic hazard

    I added a couple of new papers to my literature collection last week. The studies deal with trenching in Iran and in China, tsunami research in Japan, Malta and Thailand, with archaeoseismology in Italy, and with seismic hazard of old oceanic lithosphere. Enjoy reading! more

  • USGS report about the SAFRR Tsunami Scenario – EQ in Alaska triggers tsunami that hits California

    On 27 March, 1964, an earthquake of magnitude 9.2 occurred offshore Alaska (Plafker, 1965) and caused a Pacific-wide tsunami. This quake was the second most powerful that was ever recorded and is also referred to as the Great Alaska Earthquake. The USGS has now released a report on a comparable tsunami scenario. The SAFRR (Science Application for Risk Reduction) Tsunami Scenario deals with a tsunami caused by a major quake off Alaska and investigates the possible impact at the coast of California.  more

  • 4-year postdoctoral research position in coastal paleoseismology

    The Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, Geological Survey of Belgium, Brussels, invites applicants for a 4-year research fellow (postdoctoral level) in coastal paleoseismology/Quaternary environmental change. Starting date: 1 June 2014.

    The successful candidate will work in the framework of a 4-year research project, funded by the Belgian Science Policy Office: ‘QuakeRecNankai’ – Paleo-tsunami and earthquake records of ruptures along the Nankai Trough, offshore South-Central Japan.

    more

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