• Symposium on Mega Earthquake Induced Geo-disasters – The field trips part I: Wenchuan epicenter

    In my last post I blogged about the International Symposium on Mega Earthquake Induced Geo-disasters and Long Term Effects in Chengdu, China, and now I want to report about one of the field trips that I participated after the symposium. While we spent the morning and early afternoon at the Qipan gully to look at a giant debris flow that occurred five years after the earthquake, in the afternoon we had the chance to visit the memorial site of the 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake, which is basically the collapsed building of a middle school close to the epicenter that was left as it was after the earthquake. I want to report about this site first because it is more about the earthquake itself. In my next post I will report about the Qipan gully debris flow. more

  • ISPRA volume “Earthquake Environmental Effect for seismic hazard assessment: the ESI intensity scale and the EEE Catalogue”

    Earthquake Environmental Effects (EEE) have proven to be valuable for describing past earthquakes and their geological imprints. The ESI2007 is a relatively new intensity scale dedicated to such effects, but also integrating traditional macroseismic scales. Examples of ESI2007 intensities assigned to large earthquakes are being collected in the EEE web catalogue hosted by the ISPRA and ESI2007-related work is conducted in the framework of INQUA.

    Another milestone now has been achieved with the ISPRA volume “Earthquake Environmental Effect for seismic hazard assessment: the ESI intensity scale and the EEE Catalogue”. This book is now available online here. It contains updates on the ESI2007, examples of applications, documentation of the EEE Android App, a huge reference list and, most importantly, the ESI2007 description in ten languages: more

  • DLR

    What’s up? The Friday links (80)

    Here are some links I collected on today’s Kent Earthquake, the impossible task of earthquake prediction and some videos on Structure From Motion and Pacific tsunami propagation. Today is Friday and here are your links!


  • The 4th International Symposium on Mega Earthquake Induced Geo-disasters and Long Term Effects in Chengdu, China

    From May 8 – 13, 2015 the 4th International Symposium on Mega Earthquake Induced Geo-disasters and Long Term Effects was held in Chengdu, China, at the 7th anniversary of the Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake that occurred on May 12, 2008. Since Chengdu was basically on my way back from the Fucino 2015 PATA Days in Italy to my working place in Beijing, I was in the lucky situation to be able to participate the symposium and drive away the post-PATA-blues with exciting talks, discussions and field trips that obtained a new dimension of relevance in face of the April 25 Nepal earthquake. I thought this meeting might be interesting for the paleoseismicity community and as Christoph told me, the current example of the Nepal quake that apparently didn’t produce any surface rupture shows again the importance of earthquake environmental effects (EEEs) for paleoseismologists. So I decided to put together a little report about the symposium and in a coming post I also want to share a report and some pictures from the post-symposium field trips. more

  • OMA

    Workshop ‘Earthquake activity and hazard in northwest Europe’, Belgium, 15 October, 2015

    Our colleagues in Belgium have reasons to celebrate! At the Membach station they’re monitoring seismic activity for 40 years now, and 20 years ago the superconducting gravimeter started working. To commemorate this the Royal Observatory of Belgium and the Public Services of Wallonia organize a scientific workshop on Earthquake activity and hazard in northwest Europe. The workshop will be held on 15 October 2015 at the Gileppe Dam Tower.


  • Gösta Hoffmann

    Workshop ‘Tectonic and geodynamic evolution of Eastern Iran’, 2-6 November, 2015

    The workshop “Tectonic and geodynamic evolution of Eastern Iran” will be held in both Tehran (2 Nov) and Birjand (3-6 Nov). It will comprise 3 days of field excursion around Birjand showcasing the variety of Sistan’s geological highlights (from ophiolites, deformation events, sedimentary basins to ore-mineralizations), that will be open to ~60 people.  more

  • New paleoseismology literature

    It was quite a long break since I’ve posted the last literature round-up and that’s why the list is really long today.  Here are the latest papers on paleoseismology, active tectonics, archaeoseismology and (paleo-)tsunamis. more

  • Geological Society of America, Structural Geology & Tectonics Division

    NSF-sponsored workshop on Future Directions in Tectonics

    Future research in tectonics and structural geology is the focus of an NSF-sponsored workshop to be held in Madison, Wisconsin on July 22-24, 2015 – aimed to assemble a diverse range of earth scientists to identify pertinent and promising areas of new research, recognize and prioritize infrastructure needs that are necessary to making scientific progress, and articulate the societal relevance of research in tectonics and structural
    geology in the 21st Century. The vision articulated at the workshop will be captured in a white paper, the first of its kind since 2004, that will inform our science community, funding agencies, elected officials, and the general public.


  • What’s up? The Friday links (79)

    The Geoblogosphere is full of links on the Gorkha Earthquake in Nepal – and we have some links on this major event, too. But we found also some few more links on creating beautiful scientific posters, hilarious geomemes, and more. Today is Friday and here are your links!


  • This was the Fucino15 meeting – part III

    In the last two posts I have reported on the scientific sessions of the Fucino15 conference and on the first of the field trips. This post is about the L’Aquila field trip. I haven’t been to this city before and I was curious to see the place that sadly became so famous in earthquake science. I was surprised by how many heavily damaged buildings were still standing and by the overwhelming amount of historical buildings that await their reconstruction. We were given a great tour through the Palazzo Ardinghelli which is currently being rebuilt, then we had a look at the worst-affected parts of the city. Here’s a report in images. more


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