Almaty sits on a huge active fault, and here is why we know

Almaty, the former capital of Kazakhstan and home to ~2 million people, is a rapidly growing, vibrant city, beautifully situated at the foothills of the mighty Zailisky Alatau, the northernmost mountain range of the Tien Shan at this longitude. The city sits on a huge alluvial fan with the snow-capped mountains in the background, reaching 5,000 m elevation. Almaty has suffered from earthquakes in its young history: in 1887, the Verny earthquake with a magnitude of about 7.3 had its epicentre a few kilometres west of the city but did not produce surface ruptures (Verny is the old name of Almaty). Only two years later, the M8 Chilik earthquake ruptured the surface 100 km to the southeast of Almaty. Finally, Almaty was heavily damaged by the 1911 Chon Kemin earthquake with a magnitude of ~8, which occurred on the southern flank of the Zailisky Alatau. In our new paper we now report on a fault that did not rupture in historical times, but surely did so in the Holocene – and this fault is right beneath the city. Continue reading “Almaty sits on a huge active fault, and here is why we know”

New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Nov 2017)

Time is running and the publishing machine doesn’t stop. Another month has passed, and here we are with a whole bunch of new and existing papers on paleoseismology, active tectonics, tsunami, and archaeosesimology. Lot’s of stuff from the Tien Shan this time, including my very own paper about which I will blog in detail later. Enjoy reading! Continue reading “New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Nov 2017)”

Papers on harbours & archaeoseismology in the Med

While compiling the monthly paper round-up, I will of course miss some publications. This may be because I was in the field when the papers were published, because I don’t have an alert for the journals, or because my alerts didn’t include the right key words. For example, I missed a couple of 2017 papers by our colleagues from Mainz: Continue reading “Papers on harbours & archaeoseismology in the Med”

Special Issue in QI – Quaternary Earthquakes: Geology & Palaeoseismology for Seismic Hazard Assessment

Dear friends and colleagues,

We are happy to announce that our Special Issue from the 2015 PATA Days in Fucino is finally published in Quaternary International. This wonderful workshop commemorated the centenary of the 1915 Fucino Earthquake, and
we have seen some great active faults in the Central Apennines
and palaeoseismological research sites during the field trips. The meeting was organized by ISPRA, INGV and University of Insubria and promoted by INQUA TERPRO. Continue reading “Special Issue in QI – Quaternary Earthquakes: Geology & Palaeoseismology for Seismic Hazard Assessment”

New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Jul 2017)

Dear friends of active tectonics and paleoseismology,

Although the PATA Days in New Zealand are still five months away, it will be a long flight for most of us and I suggest to think about a good read on the plane already. Below you will find the latest publications that you may find interesting. If you prefer a good old hardcover book, why not buy Minoan Earthquakes right now? Enjoy reading! Continue reading “New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Jul 2017)”

Special issue on sub-aquatic paleoseismology

A special issue on sub-aquatic paleoseismology has been published in Marine Geology. The volume 384 ‘Subaquatic paleoseismology: records of large Holocene earthquakes in marine and lacustrine sediments‘ collects papers on marine and lacustrine mass movements that can be used to decipher the earthquake history. The contributions span a wide range of different settings, from the famous Cascadia sites to Greece, and are based on presentations from the International Sedimentological Congress in Geneva (August 2014) and the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco (December 2014). Continue reading “Special issue on sub-aquatic paleoseismology”