Posts in the category »  Paper «  ( 164 Posts )

  • New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (June 2018)

    These are the latest papers on active tectonics, paleoseismology, and tsunami. Lots of new studies from New Zealand and Greece this time, plus an intense discussion on tsunami in the Mediterranean. Enjoy! more

  • Characterizing distributed faulting of the October 30th, 2016, Central Italy earthquake

    Surface faulting is commonly observed after moderate to strong (Mw > 6.0) earthquakes. Beside primary faulting along the seismogenic structure, distributed faulting (DF) may occur in the vicinity of the principal faulting (ANSI/ANS-2.30, 2015). DF may impact wide areas and its forecasting is particularly relevant for the design of critical or distributive infrastructures (e.g., nuclear power plants). DF assessment is currently pursued through probabilistic fault displacement hazard assessment (PFDHA): in this approach, the conditional probability of DF occurrence is computed as a function of magnitude and distance from the primary fault. Empirical regressions were obtained for the different tectonic styles, based on a limited number of case histories (e.g., Youngs et al., 2003 for normal faults). more

  • New issue of Quaternary Perspectives out now

    A new issue of Quaternary Perspectives, the INQUA newsletter edited by Lyudmila Shumilovskikh, is out now. QP 25(1) includes a great report by Neta Wechsler on the 2017 PATA Days in New Zealand, more info about the 2019 PATA Days to be held in Israel, and a report on the Int’l Field Trip “From 1997 to 2016: three destructive earthquakes along the Central Apennine fault system”, 19 – 22 July 2017, Italy. Allan Ashworth informs in his INQUA president’s report about the changes that lie ahead and the upcoming challenges in re-structuring INQUA. Plus, there are interesting news on other potentially earthquake-related groups and projects such as 1701P (Late Quaternary records of coastal inundation due to earth surface deformation, tsunami, and storms), PALSEA2, HOLSEA, and GEODUST. The current issue of Quaternary Perspectives can be downloaded here (PDF, 2.57 MB) and will soon be archived at the new INQUA website (check it out!).

  • New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (May 2018)

    It looks like April/May is high season for publishing – or is it that all those papers you submitted right before Christmas are now making it through review…? Anyway, we have a lot of exciting stuff this month, including a number of studies on the Med, on Central Asia, and on New Zealand. Plus fault physics, subduction zones, glacial seismicity in N Europe, Malawi, and much more.

    Enjoy reading and let us know in case we’ve missed something. more

  • New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (April 2018)

    This month’s list of active tectonics papers contains a lot of tsunami and landslide studies, and some great stuff from Asia. Plus, New Zealand is in the focus of a number of papers. I guess it’s just about the right time period after the Kaikōura EQ to have a paper written and through review…

    Enjoy reading and happy Easter!

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (March 2018)

    A month has passed and plenty of new papers have been published. This time we have a number of contributions on the tectonics of Italy and Asia, news about seismic hazards maps, and some great earthquake physics. Enjoy the latest papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics: more

  • New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Feb 2018)

    These are the latest papers on paleoseismology, active tectonics, and archaeoseismology, today with a lot of contributions to active tectonics in Asia. Enjoy! more

  • New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Jan 2018)

    I hope you’ve had a great start into the new year. A lot of new and exciting papers have been published at the end of the old one, including work on New Zealand and Europe. Enjoy reading and have fantastic new year 2018!

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  • Almaty sits on a huge active fault, and here is why we know

    Almaty, the former capital of Kazakhstan and home to ~2 million people, is a rapidly growing, vibrant city, beautifully situated at the foothills of the mighty Zailisky Alatau, the northernmost mountain range of the Tien Shan at this longitude. The city sits on a huge alluvial fan with the snow-capped mountains in the background, reaching 5,000 m elevation. Almaty has suffered from earthquakes in its young history: in 1887, the Verny earthquake with a magnitude of about 7.3 had its epicentre a few kilometres west of the city but did not produce surface ruptures (Verny is the old name of Almaty). Only two years later, the M8 Chilik earthquake ruptured the surface 100 km to the southeast of Almaty. Finally, Almaty was heavily damaged by the 1911 Chon Kemin earthquake with a magnitude of ~8, which occurred on the southern flank of the Zailisky Alatau. In our new paper we now report on a fault that did not rupture in historical times, but surely did so in the Holocene – and this fault is right beneath the city. more

  • New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Dec 2017)

    Today’s list of latest papers includes some classic paleoseismology stuff, interesting offshore studies, and a good portion of fault physics and geomorphology. Oh, and icebergs. Enjoy!

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