Papers on harbours & archaeoseismology in the Med

While compiling the monthly paper round-up, I will of course miss some publications. This may be because I was in the field when the papers were published, because I don’t have an alert for the journals, or because my alerts didn’t include the right key words. For example, I missed a couple of 2017 papers by our colleagues from Mainz: Continue reading “Papers on harbours & archaeoseismology in the Med”

Special Issue in QI – Quaternary Earthquakes: Geology & Palaeoseismology for Seismic Hazard Assessment

Dear friends and colleagues,

We are happy to announce that our Special Issue from the 2015 PATA Days in Fucino is finally published in Quaternary International. This wonderful workshop commemorated the centenary of the 1915 Fucino Earthquake, and
we have seen some great active faults in the Central Apennines
and palaeoseismological research sites during the field trips. The meeting was organized by ISPRA, INGV and University of Insubria and promoted by INQUA TERPRO. Continue reading “Special Issue in QI – Quaternary Earthquakes: Geology & Palaeoseismology for Seismic Hazard Assessment”

New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Jul 2017)

Dear friends of active tectonics and paleoseismology,

Although the PATA Days in New Zealand are still five months away, it will be a long flight for most of us and I suggest to think about a good read on the plane already. Below you will find the latest publications that you may find interesting. If you prefer a good old hardcover book, why not buy Minoan Earthquakes right now? Enjoy reading! Continue reading “New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Jul 2017)”

Special issue on sub-aquatic paleoseismology

A special issue on sub-aquatic paleoseismology has been published in Marine Geology. The volume 384 ‘Subaquatic paleoseismology: records of large Holocene earthquakes in marine and lacustrine sediments‘ collects papers on marine and lacustrine mass movements that can be used to decipher the earthquake history. The contributions span a wide range of different settings, from the famous Cascadia sites to Greece, and are based on presentations from the International Sedimentological Congress in Geneva (August 2014) and the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco (December 2014). Continue reading “Special issue on sub-aquatic paleoseismology”

Minoan Earthquakes: Breaking the Myth through Interdisciplinarity

In a recent post on this forum, Angela Landgraf shared a digest of the long and winding road having led to the publication of Seismicity, Fault Rupture and Earthquake Hazards in Slowly Deforming Regions. Reading this post in the midst of wrapping up the edition of our Minoan Earthquakes volume, I could only sympathize with her concerns and hopes for the future of edited books at a time when impact factors and other author-level metrics all too often dictate academic choices.

Four years and a half (!) after the Out of Rubble Leuven workshop (29-30 November 2012), we are proud to announce the publication of Minoan Earthquakes: Breaking the Myth through Interdisciplinarity at Leuven University Press. Reasons for such delay are manifold but chief among them is our editorial choice of producing a coherent volume that might be used as an up-to-date toolbox for readers interested in the broader field of archaeoseismology – not just Minoan archaeoseismology – and its (necessary) relationship to other, better established, disciplines. This choice is reflected by the structure of the book and breadth of topics covered by its authors, ranging from seismology, paleoseismology, geophysics, architecture, engineering and, of course, Minoan archaeology. Although we will ultimately leave readers to judge how successful we were in this endeavor, we are encouraged by Iain Stewart’s appreciation of the volume: Continue reading “Minoan Earthquakes: Breaking the Myth through Interdisciplinarity”

Use late-Holocene tidal notches as earthquake geological effects?

Tidal notches are a generally excepted sea-level marker. Particularly in the Mediterranean, those shoreline indicators are oftentimes used to infer coastal coseismic activity when they occur displaced from present day sea-level. Now, paleoseismologists should be able to visualize coastal evolution in order to better understand coseismic history. Continue reading “Use late-Holocene tidal notches as earthquake geological effects?”

Paper: Using georadar and a mobile geoelectrics device to map shallow sediment distribution on a large scale

[UPDATE 2017-05-14: The links now lead to the free version of the paper, available until 30 June.]

Together with my colleagues I have published a new paper in which we describe a methodology for mapping the shallow architecture of large sedimentary basins with minimum effort and high resolution. We use two geophysical methods and combine them with point information from shallow drillings to identify different types of alluvial, fluvial, and aeolian sediments in the Orkhon Valley in Mongolia. We then show that our results fit well with a remote sensing approach. Although we did not target active faults in our study, the methodology is well suitable for detecting deformed/offset sediments without surface expression due to high erosion or sedimentation rates. That’s why I feel the study is of interest for the fault-hunting community. Continue reading “Paper: Using georadar and a mobile geoelectrics device to map shallow sediment distribution on a large scale”

New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (May 2017)

It’s just a few months after the Kaikoura earthquake and now the first papers have been published already. Today’s paper round-up also includes studies on dating tsunami boulders, turbidite paleoseismology, paleoseismology in the Tien Shan, the recent Italy and New Zealand earthquakes, and earthquakes and social media. Enjoy reading! Continue reading “New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (May 2017)”