Finale Emilia earthquake: preliminary report on Earthquake Environmental Effects (EEEs)

The University Insubria (Como, Italy) has published the first report on the earthquake environmental effects that accompanied the Northern Italy “Finale Emilia Earthquake” of 20 May, 2012. On that day, a quake with magnitude Mw6.1 rocked the Po Plain, leaving seven people dead and hundreds of houses damaged. On 29 May, a very strong M5.8 aftershock occurred in the region. Continue reading “Finale Emilia earthquake: preliminary report on Earthquake Environmental Effects (EEEs)”

New data from the Northern Italy Mw6.1 earthquake (20 May 2012)

The INGV has published some new data on the earthquake that hit Italy in the morning of 20 May, 2012 and caused damages and casualties. Peak ground accelerations (PGA) reached 28%g in the epicentral area. This is not unusual for an event of that size. Peak ground velocities (PGV) were as high as 20 cm/s. The spectral response is more interesting. The 3s period response is 1.5%g only, at 1s period the area encountered 18%g, and for the 0.3s period the values reached 49%g, which is quite a lot for a Mw6.1 quake. However, the longer periods tend to be more dangerous for buildings. Continue reading “New data from the Northern Italy Mw6.1 earthquake (20 May 2012)”

Mw6.1 earthquake rocks Northern Italy

An earthquake of magnitude Mw6.1 (EMSC data; USGS: M6.0) rocked Northern Italy on 20 May, 2012 at 2 am UTC. The epicentre was located on 35 km NNW of Bologna in the Po Plain at around 10 km depth. Media report at least 6 people dead and up to 50 injured. Intensities reached up to EMS VIII. Especially old brick buildings suffered severe damages and many collapses are reported. Continue reading “Mw6.1 earthquake rocks Northern Italy”

Video on geological and geophysical field work in Greece – The dirt people reloaded

I have made a video of our fieldwork in Greece, because I guess somehow we must communicate to the public what our work is about. Also, we must encourage young people to study geosciences. Well, now I concentrated on the second task: Hey, clever young people out there! Do you like science? Do you like nature? Are you interested in the big questions like “Where does this rock come from? When will the next earthquake happen? Where can I find groundwater? Why do volcanoes erupt? Which coast is threatened by Tsunamis?” Do you like to travel abroad, to work hard and to still have fun in the evenings? Do you want to meet nice people? If you answered “yes” to at least one of the above, think about studying geoscience. Continue reading “Video on geological and geophysical field work in Greece – The dirt people reloaded”

PostDoc research position on Tsunami deposits, EQ Geology, Tectonics (Mexico)

The Group on Active Tectonics (GAT) and the Environmental Geophysics University Laboratory (LUGA) at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), Campus Morelia seeks applicants for a Postdoctoral Research position. The candidate will pursue fundamental and applied research into either a) active tectonics and/or b) tsunami deposits and paleoseismology with focus on the Mexican Subduction Zone. The candidate will be responsible for the development and execution of field and laboratory research, and to conduct studies on the geologic signature left by great earthquakes and their tsunamis. The fields of application include earthquake hazard, tsunami hazard and long-term earthquake record of this active margin.

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Take part in an experiment: Measuring tectonically offset features

Folks at Arizona State University and San Diego State University are conducting a study to test the repeatability, accuracy, and precision of lateral displacement measurements derived from high-resolution topographic Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data. Please take a few minutes to participate! If you have any questions about the research or would like to use the materials as a classroom exercise, please feel free to email Barrett at jbsalisb@asu.edu.

Continue reading “Take part in an experiment: Measuring tectonically offset features”

Airborne LiDAR shows how the M 7.2 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake in Mexico changed the landscape

A very interesting paper by Oskin et al. (2012) published in Science (http://www.sciencemag.org/content/335/6069/702.full) a few days ago shows how the M 7.2 Mexico earthquake in April, 2010, has changed the landscape down to a few cm. The El Mayor–Cucapah earthquake produced a 120-kilometer-long multifault rupture through northernmost Baja California, Mexico. Continue reading “Airborne LiDAR shows how the M 7.2 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake in Mexico changed the landscape”