Posts in the category »   «  ( 215 Posts )

  • New Paper: Paleoseismology & active tectonics in Greece, and how seismic hazard zonation fails

    We published a new study dealing with paleoseismological work on the Milesi Fault near Athens, Greece. A slip rate was estimated based on GIS work, mapping, and trenching. Four surface-rupturing earthquakes in the last 4-6 ka were found, and we estimate magnitudes of around M6.2. With these input parameters, we developed a seismic hazard scenario that also takes into account site effects. Our results show that the official seismic hazard zonation in Greece, which is based on instrumental and historical records, contradicts geological data. We also show that extension in this region is not only confined to the Southern Evoikos Gulf graben system, but a significant amount of extension is accommodated by active faults closer to Athens. more

  • What’s up? The Friday links (66)

    Second week of 2015 is already over, time runs fast, right? Have you met all your deadlines yet? You are already on the final stretch: Today is Friday, here are your links!

    more

  • Share your results with qgis2leaf

    As we are often use geodata and analyse, store them or visualize them using a GIS we depend somehow on the person on the other side to understand how a GIS functions or how to use the GIS. A webmap- like the well know google maps- is therefore an easy way to communicate your data and results. But creating a webmap is not always a funny thing to do as we are more geoscientists than programmers. QGIS2leaf for QGIS is a great plugin for creating a basic webmap. more

  • QGIS 2.0 released – watch out ESRI!

    Working on spatial data is the key feature of being a geoscientist and a lot of this work is done using ArcGIS from ESRI. QGIS was always an alternative especially looking at the costs of a full ESRI license. But when it comes to “making maps” QGIS was always behind ArcGIS in map formatting and export. The map composer was more or less … ugly and not state of the art. more

Newsletter

Just click the "Unsubscribe" link which you find in every newsletter you get and your email adress will be removed from the subscribers list in seconds.

Facebook

} ?>

Sharing Options

Digg this
Delicious
Stumbleupon
Reddit
Like us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter
Follow us on Google +
The paleosesismicity.org group on LinkedIn
Subscribe to the paleoseismicity Newsletter