Posts in the category »   «  ( 202 Posts )

  • New papers on paleoseismology, earthquakes, and active tectonics (Aug 2020)

    This time we have a number of studies on historical earthquakes, active tectonics studies from all around the world, a view review and methods articles, and plenty of tsunami stuff. Make sure to check out the new book on the geological record of extreme waves! Enjoy reading and let us know in case we’ve missed something.

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, earthquakes, and active tectonics (June 2020)

    It looks like publishing hasn’t been affected much by the Corona situation, this month’s list is probably the longest we’ve ever had. Enjoy reading and stay safe!

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  • Session on Advances in Archaeoseismology: Methods, Techniques, and Case Studies at the ESC 2020, 6-11 Sep, Corfu

    Klaus-G. Hinzen, Fabrizio Galadini, Shmuel Marco, Stathis Stiros, and Amanda M. Gaggioli invite contributions to an archaeoseismology session at the 37. Assembly of the European Seismological Commission (ESC) 2020, September 6-11 in Corfu, Greece. Deadline for abstract submission is April 12th 2020.

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  • Archaeoseismology – Earthquake damage in Machu Picchu

    A recent study presented at the GSA meeting concludes that the UNESCO World Heritage site of Machu Picchu in Peru was intentionally built on faulted bedrock in order to ease the quarrying of the huge blocks used as construction material (Menegat, 2019). But has Machu Picchu seen big earthquakes in its lifetime? And if so, can it tell us something about their magnitude? After all, there are plenty of earthquakes in Peru, not only at the subduction zone but also in the Andes (e.g., Wimpenny et al., 2018). Some strong instrumental events occurred less than 100 km away from the Inca site. However, in the area of Machu Picchu we knew little about strong earthquakes. That’s why in 2016 a group of researchers from Peru, France, and the UK including myself started to investigate the active faults around Cusco and archaeoseismological damage to Machu Picchu and other famous Inca sites nearby in the CUSCO-PATA project.

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, earthquakes, and active tectonics (Oct 2019)

    Today we have a lot of papers on historical events, some great classical paleoseismology studies, and seismic hazard stuff. Enjoy reading!

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  • Challenges & Conclusions from the 6th Int’l Colloquium on Historical earthquakes & Paleoseismology studies, Han-sur-Lesse, Belgium

    The 6th Int’l Colloquium on Historical earthquakes & Paleoseismology studies took place in October 2018 in Han-sur-Lesse, Belgium. Our colleagues Koen Van Noten, Thierry Camelbeeck, and  Thomas Lecocq have put together a nice summary of this event, pointing out future challenges in the field:

    From 24 to 26 October 2018 55 scientists from 14 countries gathered at Han-sur-Lesse in Belgium for the annual gathering of the Colloquium on Historical earthquakes and Seismology. During this well attended conference, four invited keynote talks, 27 oral and 16 poster contributions were presented. Topics in this multidisciplinary colloquium spanned four themes. The first three themes are recurrent themes in this Colloquium series and focused on (1) Seismology and Historical earthquakes, (2) Paleoseismology and (3) Archaeoseismology. The organisers also specifically wanted to focus on (4) Earthquakes and natural caves; a discipline in which major progress was recently made. This topic was heavily debated during the field trip to the Han-sur-Lesse and Rochefort caves on 25 October 2018. Hereinafter we summarise what was presented (see program) by the attendants and which challenges seismologists – and friends – face these days.

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  • PATA Days 2018 in Thessaloniki, Greece – website now online

    The 9th PATA Days will take place from 24-29 June in Thessaloniki, Greece. The event is organised by Spyros Pavlides and Alex Chatzipetros and supported by INQUA/TERPRO.

    The conference website is now online at http://www.patadays2018.org.

    Save the date for the next round of great discussions about  Paleoseismology, Active Tectonics, and Archaeoseismology! The PATA Days 2018 commemorate the 40th anniversary of the Thessaloniki earthquakes. more

  • New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Sep 2017)

    These are the latets papers on paleoseismology, active tectonics, and archaeoseismology. Enjoy! more

  • New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Jul 2017)

    Dear friends of active tectonics and paleoseismology,

    Although the PATA Days in New Zealand are still five months away, it will be a long flight for most of us and I suggest to think about a good read on the plane already. Below you will find the latest publications that you may find interesting. If you prefer a good old hardcover book, why not buy Minoan Earthquakes right now? Enjoy reading! more

  • Minoan Earthquakes: Breaking the Myth through Interdisciplinarity

    In a recent post on this forum, Angela Landgraf shared a digest of the long and winding road having led to the publication of Seismicity, Fault Rupture and Earthquake Hazards in Slowly Deforming Regions. Reading this post in the midst of wrapping up the edition of our Minoan Earthquakes volume, I could only sympathize with her concerns and hopes for the future of edited books at a time when impact factors and other author-level metrics all too often dictate academic choices.

    Four years and a half (!) after the Out of Rubble Leuven workshop (29-30 November 2012), we are proud to announce the publication of Minoan Earthquakes: Breaking the Myth through Interdisciplinarity at Leuven University Press. Reasons for such delay are manifold but chief among them is our editorial choice of producing a coherent volume that might be used as an up-to-date toolbox for readers interested in the broader field of archaeoseismology – not just Minoan archaeoseismology – and its (necessary) relationship to other, better established, disciplines. This choice is reflected by the structure of the book and breadth of topics covered by its authors, ranging from seismology, paleoseismology, geophysics, architecture, engineering and, of course, Minoan archaeology. Although we will ultimately leave readers to judge how successful we were in this endeavor, we are encouraged by Iain Stewart’s appreciation of the volume: more

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