QGIS 2.0 released – watch out ESRI!

Working on spatial data is the key feature of being a geoscientist and a lot of this work is done using ArcGIS from ESRI. QGIS was always an alternative especially looking at the costs of a full ESRI license. But when it comes to “making maps” QGIS was always behind ArcGIS in map formatting and export. The map composer was more or less … ugly and not state of the art. Continue reading “QGIS 2.0 released – watch out ESRI!”

INQUA ECR meeting (2-6 Dec 2013, Wollongong, Australia) and Quaternary International Special Issue

The INQUA Early Career Researcher inter-congress meeting will take place from 2 – 6 December, 2013 at Wollongong University, Australia. The meeting will bring together young earth scientists with a research focus on the Quaternary, from grad students to PostDocs. Thematic workshops on scientific writing and Quaternary science will be held and you’ll have the chance to discuss with colleagues fromn all over the world. The application deadline for travel support is 15 September, abstract submission and registration should be made before 1 October. There will be a Special Issue in INQUA’s journal Quaternary International in support of this meeting. This is a unique chance for ECRs, so spread the word and submit articles!  Continue reading “INQUA ECR meeting (2-6 Dec 2013, Wollongong, Australia) and Quaternary International Special Issue”

Field Training Course and Workshop “Tectonic and climatic forcing on the Late Quaternary landscape evolution of Central Argentina”, 14-18 October 2013

From 14-18 October 2013 a field training course will take place in Central Argentina. The course and a workshop are organized by the Sam-GeoQuat Group, the topic is: “From the Pampean Ranges to the North Pampa: Tectonic and climatic forcing on the Late Quaternary landscape evolution of Central Argentina”. Deadline for registration is 30 August, so hurry if you are interested. Download the 1st circular (pdf, <1 MB) here: 1-course-sam-geoquat2013 Continue reading “Field Training Course and Workshop “Tectonic and climatic forcing on the Late Quaternary landscape evolution of Central Argentina”, 14-18 October 2013”

Spanish kids learn about archaeoseismology in Baelo Claudia

This is a nice and short video performed by 9-10 year old kids and conducted by two teachers of the School “Escuelas Francesas” located at Sevilla (Spain), and in collaboration with our Spanish colleagues Miguel, Jorge and Pablo. The kids read about our work on earthquake effects on archaeological sites and they have reproduced in a easy way the main EAEs in the Roman buildings of Baelo Claudia: the aqueduct, the drop of the key stone in arches and oriented fallen columns. (EAE: Earthquake Archaeological Effect; see Rodríguez-Pacua et al., 2011). Continue reading “Spanish kids learn about archaeoseismology in Baelo Claudia”

An open access, collaborative initiative to compile info on active faults in Himalaya, Andes

I came across this great initiative after Richard Styron sent the announcement via the Geotectonics mailing list. He’s currently maintaining these projects. The idea is to compile all available data on active structures in the Himalaya using the GitHub infrastructure (basically a collaborative platform for programming) . Everyone can join and help compiling active faults in this region. The data is then available to everyone for free in different data formats. The same thing is currently happening for the Andes region, too! Continue reading “An open access, collaborative initiative to compile info on active faults in Himalaya, Andes”

A climbing snake in Jim McCalpin’s paleoseismological trench

In Mai 2013, Jim McCalpin’s field course on Field Methods in Neotectonics and Paleoseismology took place in Crestone, CO. Our friend Jack Mason from the Institute of Neotectonics and Natural Hazards of RWTH Aachen University took part and sent me this amazing video. They encountered a bullsnake in the paleoseismological trench! Surprisingly, the snake decided to climb out of the trench via the vertical wall.  Continue reading “A climbing snake in Jim McCalpin’s paleoseismological trench”

Field work on active faults – wildlife edition

Today we went for field work again – mapping active faults in Northern Attica, trying to find out about offsets and slip rates, and scouting sites for applying Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) later. We found some very beautiful fault scarps and measured a good number of strike and dip values. At two locations we also recorded topographic profiles across the scarps in order to get an idea about the vertical offset. Combined with the assumption that these scarps are post-glacial, we can estimate slip rates. Continue reading “Field work on active faults – wildlife edition”

Field work on active faults in Greece

I am currently in Greece for field work on faults in the vicinity of Athens. Sascha from RWTH Aachen University is doing his MSc. thesis on remote sensing, geophysical analyses, and mapping of some structures that we think could be active, and me and Ioannis are with him in the field for the first few days. Right on the first day we found some promising outcrops which we will map and check in detail during the next days. Continue reading “Field work on active faults in Greece”

Field Course in Neotectonics & Paleoseismology – May 22-31, 2013 in Crestone, Colorado, USA

Jim McCalpin will teach his 13th Field Course in Neotectonics and Paleoseismology from May 22-31, 2013 in Crestone, Colorado, USA. This is a “9-day summer Field Course, offered by the Crestone Science Center, which teaches the latest field techniques, but also contains evening lectures covering the entire field of Paleoseismology.” Continue reading “Field Course in Neotectonics & Paleoseismology – May 22-31, 2013 in Crestone, Colorado, USA”