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Posts in the category »   «  ( 91 Posts )

  • What’s up? The Friday links (10)

    Today’s Friday links concentrate on tsunamis. Recently, Pure and Applied Geophysics came up with quite a lot of tsunami papers, and I am sure that this decision was made before the Japan tsunami happened. Some papers fur sure are interesting for analysing past tsunamis and earthquake environmental effects.

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  • Japan – strong aftershocks continue

    A strong aftershock has rocked Japan on 11 April. USGS reported a magnitude of 6.7, while EMSC estimated M6.6. A tsunami warning has been released by the Japan Meteorological Agency for the eastern coast of Japan’s Honshu Island. UPDATE 13:06 MEST: The Tsunami warning has been cancelled. more

  • Japan earthquake aftermath – blogs and press

    The Japan earthquake and tsunami have hit Japan harder than we could have imagined. Thousands are still missing, the death toll climbs and climbs, a nuclear disaster might happen or already happened, depending on who you ask, and the economical damages are incredibly high. Not only Japan was affected, but other countries as well feel the effects. Germany, for example, shut down seven of it’s oldest nuclear power plants and there’s a big debate on earthquakes and risks. The Geoblogosphere is still discussing lessons, estimations and consequences, and so are the official media. Here are some reports and opinions you should not miss. more

  • What’s up? The Friday links (9)

    While the Japan earthquake has dominated the media obviously, some other news came up in geoscience. A researcher team lead by Ludovic Ferrierè who works at the Natural History Museum in Vienna claims to have proven the first impact crater in central Africa. The Luizi structure in the Democratic Republic of Congo was described in 1919 by a German study, but has not been confirmed as an impact crater for decades. Ferrierè and his team now found shatter cones and shocked quartzes, strongly pointing to an impact.  The crater has a diameter of 17 km and a 350 m high rim, which led the scientists to assume a meteor of 1 km diameter and a velocity of ~20,000 m/s. more

  • SSA meeting: Special session on Japan, Christchurch EQs

    The Seismological Society of America has re-opened abstract submission for a special session on the Christchurch and Japan earthquakes during the Memphis conference. Deadline for new abstracts on this topic is 25 March.

    The Seismological Society of America‘s annual meeting 2011 will take place in Memphis, Tennessee from 13 – 15 April.  A special focus is set on the New Madrid earthquakes, so paleoseismologists will definitely hear some interesting sessions there. Post meeting excursions are scheduled 16 April.  For more information visit the official website.

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  • Liquefaction in Tokyo Central Park

    Thanks to Alessandro I came across this incredible video of liquefaction occuring in the Tokyo Central Park during the M9.0 Japan earthquake. We can see a lot of very interesting features. First, cracks are opening, perfectly visible on the paved road and the cobble. Then we see the differential moving along those cracks, they are widening and narrowing and there’s vertical movement as well. Soon, the first ruptures appear in the meadows, despite the soft sediment there. more

  • Japan EQ & Tsunami: Environmental Effects

    The Japan M9.0 earthquake and the following tsunami are well documented by videos, photographs, sea-level measurements, seismograms etc. But how do we recognize such huge events if they happened some thousands of years ago? If there’s no historical report we would use earthquake environmental effects (EEE) for characterizing the earthquake and paleoseismicity. Let’s look what would be left from a 5000 year old earthquake and tsunami. more

  • Mw9.0 earthquake hits Japan, causes Tsunami (updated – 3)

    An earthquake with a magnitude of Mw9.0 has occured 130 km east of Honshu, Japan in a depth of ~25 km. This had been the fourth or fifth strongest earthquake to be recorded by instrumental seismology. The quake caused significant destruction to the Honshu Island and triggered a tsunami that  destroyed a number of harbours. In some places (Sendai), tsunami heights were reported to exceed 10 m. A tsunami warning has been released for wide parts of the Pacific, but in Hawaii only 1 m was observed, therefore the warnings for the US West Coast have been lowered. more

  • “spektrumdirekt” reports on archeoseismology

    The online science magazine “spektrumdirekt” reports on the archeoseismological and paleoseismological studies in Baelo Claudia, Southern Spain. The article focusses on tsunami hazard in the Mediterranean region and the two earthquakes that devastated the Roman town of Baelo Claudia hundreds of years ago. more

  • New Tsunami-papers published!

    Two new paper were published on tsunami research in the Zeitschrift für Geomorphologie:

    Reicherter, K., Vonberg, D., Koster B., Fernández-Steeger T., Grützner, C. & Mathes-Schmidt, M. 2010. The sedimentary inventory of the 1755 Lisbon tsunami along the southern Gulf of Cádiz (southwestern Spain). Zeitschrift für Geomorphologie Vol. 54, Suppl. 3, 147-173. link more

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