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  • New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (June 2016)

    It’s June and it’s time for a new paper round-up, isn’t it? When I compiled the list during the past weeks I already realized that there’s a lot of new literature out there, and I guess this month’s post is probably the longest list we’ve ever had – 21 articles! So here are the latest papers on paleoseismology, tsunamis (maaaany tsunami papers this time), and active tectonics. As always: Any suggestions are highly appreciated. Enjoy reading!

     

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  • New papers on paleoseismology in the Tien Shan

    Between 1885 and 1938, the northern Tien Shan at the border between present Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan experienced a remarkable series of five major earthquakes, exceeding M6.9 and reaching up to M ~ 8 (1885 Belovodskoe M6.9, 1887 Verny M7.3, 1889 Chilik M~8, 1911 Chon Kemin M8, and 1938 Kemino Chu M6.9). Combined, the seismic moments add up to almost moment magnitude 9, which is a significant amount of strain released in roughly 50 years and across an E-W stretch of less than 500 kilometers. Even more intriguing is the fact that the ruptured region is located more than thousand km north of the nearest plate boundary and associated India-Eurasia collision zone. The macroseismic areas of these earthquakes include the present-day capital of Kyrgyzstan, Bishkek (Frunze) and the former capital and still largest city of Kazakhstan, Almaty (earlier names Alma Ata and Verny).
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  • PATA Days program out now!

    Dear friends and colleagues,

    The 7th PATA Days will start in a few days and the scientific program is out now: Program PATA Days (1.5 MB, PDF). Jim McCalpin just told us that the weather is still somewhat challenging so bring your warm jumper and your waterproofs for the field trips. See you all very soon in Colorado!

     

  • 2nd field meeting of the Argentinian Association for Quaternary and Geomorphology

    The 2nd field meeting of the Argentinian Association for Quaternary and Geomorphology (Reunión de CAMPO de la Asociacion Argentina de Cuaternario y Geomorfología) will be held from 6-8 October, 2016, in San Juan. The conference covers all aspects of Quaternary and geomorphological research, including neotectonics, paleoseismology, natural hazards, and tectonic geomorphology. Check the Facebook page for more information or download the 3rd circular here (pdf). The registration form is available here (doc). All inquiries should be directed to reuniongeomorfologiasanjuan@gmail.com.

     

  • New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (May 2016)

    Today’s paper round-up covers a very wide spectrum of earthquake related studies. We have work on tsunamis, turbidites, and lake paleoseismology, paleoseismological data from Asia, Archaeoseismology, mud volcanoes, the ESI-2007 scale, and an explanation on what the rise of the Andes is driven by. Enjoy reading!

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  • IGCP Project 639 “Sea-level changes: From minutes to millenia” – First Meeting Announcement

    The IGCP project 639 deals with sea-level changes, coastal earthquakes, and inundation by storms and tsunami: “Sea-level changes: From minutes to millenia”. The first meeting in Oman will take place from 9-14 November 2016 and will cover all science under the IGCP project 639 banner. Make sure to put this on your agenda if you’re interested.

    Further details will be forthcoming in the second announcement in the next month. The abstract submission deadline will likely be 1 August, 2016.

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Apr 2016)

    This is the April edition of my paper round-up. Today I recommend papers on high-resolution topography data, fault mechanics, earthquake environmental/archaeological effects (liquefaction, rotated objects, landslides), Quaternary dating, a fault database for Asia, and tectonics of New Zealand and Martinique. Enjoy! more

  • New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Mar 2016)

    It’s only one month since my last paper update and yet I have nineteen interesting new studies for you. Today’s round-up includes tsunamis, tectonic geomorphology, environmental earthquake effects and soft sediment deformation, new techniques/technology, and some classic paleoseismology. Enjoy! more

  • Guest blog by Sascha Schneiderwind (RWTH Aachen University): Multiparametric trenching investigations

    [Update 15 February 2017: Since Sascha is an author here now, the post was attributed to him.]
    Greece is one of the main targets of RWTH Aachen’s Neotectonics & Geohazards group. They worked on paleo-tsunamis, active faults on the Peloponnese, in Attica, and on Crete, and on the application of terrestrial LiDAR and shallow geophysics for active tectonics research. In their latest paper, Sascha Schneiderwind et al. developed a methodology to aid paleoseismic trenching studies. They use t-LiDAR and georadar to better and more objectively characterise lithological units. His paper includes nice examples from Crete and from the famous Kaparelli Fault. Here is his guest blog: more

  • A Holocene surface rupture in Germany

    I am quite happy that our new paper has finally been published in GJI. We worked on a fault between Aachen and Cologne in Germany and found that there has been a surface rupturing earthquake less than 9000 years ago, and possibly not much older than 2500 years BP. The area is of interest also because in 1755/56 a series of damaging earthquakes hit Düren and its surroundings – these are the strongest historical events in Germany that we know of. The quakes were felt as far away as Berlin, Strasbourg, and London, yet there were no primary ruptures. “Our” quake must have been much stronger… more

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