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  • Which are the must-read papers in tectonics and structural geology?

    The Tectonics and Structural Geology Division of EGU (TS) has started a great thing: They are asking the community to name 3-5 must-read papers in their field. This could be really old fundamental stuff or ground-breaking new research – whatever you think everyone in Tectonics & StructGeol should read. The TS team will then select the 40-50 most-voted papers, discuss each of them within the TS community on a public platform on a fortnightly basis, write a summary of each paper and its discussion, and create a compilation of the TS “Must-read” papers that will be permanently archived on EarthArXiv. You can place your vote here or read the blog post on how it works here. Thanks to Silvia Crosetto for pointing me to this cool initiative!

  • How to make a beautiful flow map

    OK, this is a bit off-topic, but I was asked to write a short tutorial about how to make the flow map that I posted on Twitter. Why did I actually make it? Usually I am interested in faults and earthquakes, but sometimes secondary earthquake effects such as landslides can help us to find out about seismic activity. Since my next project will be about the Alps, I am currently looking a bit into landslides, too. The map shows a large landslide close to Jena, the Dohlenstein. This slide was activated several times in the past 300 years or so, but now seems to be stable. Behind the head scarp there is a small depression. I was wondering if this is perhaps just (paleo-)drainage, or if it could be the first hint for a new sliding plane and a larger future landslide. That’s why I made the flow map – if the depression has no outflow, it’s more likely to be related to newly forming tension cracks.

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  • Short Course in Structural Geology and Tectonics of Hokkaido

    An interesting post-grad student training course will be held from 26 June – 7 July, 2017, at Hokkaido University:
    Structural Geology and Tectonics of Hokkaido: Geometric principles, and the relationship between active and ancient deformation.
    During this course you will learn how geologic structures, developed from microscopic to map scale, reflect the rates, directions, and mechanics of past and contemporary plate tectonics and deformation. You will also hone your three-dimensional perception and skills through practical applications.

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  • Open access paper: Great challenges in structural geology and tectonics

    The new open access journal Frontiers in Earth Sciences recently appeared. Its first published article in the Structural Geology and Tectonics section is an overview piece by Chief Editor Agust Gudmundsson about Great challenges in structural geology and tectonics. The article provides a nice round-up of some basic questions in tectonics that are still not well enough understood and which definitely need to be addressed in the (near) future. It starts from questions which sound easy to be answered (How many tectonic plates are there?), but actually aren’t. more

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