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  • PhD Opportunity in Active Tectonics and Remote Sensing, University of Canterbury, New Zealand

    This is a pretty cool job opportunity in one of the world’s most interesting places. Topics include: (1) developing techniques for processing historical aerial photographs into digital elevation data; (2) analysis of pre- and post-earthquake data for the purpose of assessing fault geometries, connectivity and kinematics; (3) modelling multi-fault ruptures using geologic and remotely sensed validation datasets, and exploring the implications of this research for seismic hazard analysis.

    https://findajob.agu.org/job/8009710/phd-scholarship-at-the-university-of-canterbury-new-zealand/

  • Open position: Postdoctoral Research Assistant in Active Tectonics, Univ. Oxford

    The University of Oxford is looking for a PostDoc research assistant under the direction of Professor Richard Walker and Professor Philip England to work on active tectonics in China. The focus is on the Hexi corridor and the Qilian Shan of Gansu. Deadline for application is 15 July 2016.

    Tasks include:

    • Detailed mapping of palaeo-earthquake ruptures
    • Construction of slip distributions from individual earthquakes
    • Selection of sites for long-term slip-rate determination using field investigations, high-resolution satellite imagery and digital topography
    • Planning and carrying out fieldwork to verify remote-sensing observations, to collect samples for dating, and to excavate and interpret palaeo-seismic trenches

    See the full job description here.

  • New paper: Evolution of dilatant faults in the Canyonlands NP, Utah

    The Canyonlands National Park, Utah, is famous for its beautiful landscape and spectacular landforms. For many geoscientists it is also well-known as a sandstone reservoir analogue and as a tourist you’ll often run into groups of geologists on field trips. It’s a matter of debate how and how fast the beautiful grabens in the Needles Fault zone formed – these are large arcuate canyons several tens of kilometres in length, paralleling the Colorado River. In a new paper we present results from remote sensing, mapping, and georadar (GPR). Our aim was to better understand the coupling between deformation, erosion and deposition in such an active system. Based on our findings we developed a model of graben formation and describe the geometry of the dilatant faults at depth. We argue that either the grabens are older than previously assumed or that sedimentation rates were much higher in the Pleistocene.

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  • Tectonics from above – RAS discussion meeting

    Last Friday the RAS held a discussion meeting on Tectonics from Above: Recent Advances in the Use of High-resolution Topography and Imagery in London. Almost the entire Cambridge Tectonics Group went there and I absolutely enjoyed the meeting and the discussion with friends and colleagues mainly from the UK and from France. The speakers reported on open-source software for producing high-res DEMs, advances in aerial and satellite imagery, new techniques in remote sensing, and latest developments in fault/offset mapping. The meeting was supported by NERC, COMET+ and LICS. more