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  • 2nd field meeting of the Argentinian Association for Quaternary and Geomorphology

    The 2nd field meeting of the Argentinian Association for Quaternary and Geomorphology (Reunión de CAMPO de la Asociacion Argentina de Cuaternario y Geomorfología) will be held from 6-8 October, 2016, in San Juan. The conference covers all aspects of Quaternary and geomorphological research, including neotectonics, paleoseismology, natural hazards, and tectonic geomorphology. Check the Facebook page for more information or download the 3rd circular here (pdf). The registration form is available here (doc). All inquiries should be directed to reuniongeomorfologiasanjuan@gmail.com.

     

  • New papers on paleoseismology, active tectonics and tsunami research

    Several new papers deal with paleoseismology and active tectonics studies. Wiatr et al. used terrestrial LiDAR to analyse limestone bedrock scarps, Hornblow et al. investigated the Darfield earthquake source in NZ. Sarikaya et al. present new data on offset alluvial fans in Central Turkey; Xu et al. present geological data on two historical seismic events in Tibet. Tectonic morphology is used by Barcelona et al. in NW Argentina. Mathew et al. use remote sensing data to analyze coseismic deformation in China. Ed Garrett and colleagues present data on 1000 years of megathrust quakes in Chile, and Bemis et al. have an interesting article on UAVs and paleoseismology. more

  • Field Training Course and Workshop “Tectonic and climatic forcing on the Late Quaternary landscape evolution of Central Argentina”, 14-18 October 2013

    From 14-18 October 2013 a field training course will take place in Central Argentina. The course and a workshop are organized by the Sam-GeoQuat Group, the topic is: “From the Pampean Ranges to the North Pampa: Tectonic and climatic forcing on the Late Quaternary landscape evolution of Central Argentina”. Deadline for registration is 30 August, so hurry if you are interested. Download the 1st circular (pdf, <1 MB) here: 1-course-sam-geoquat2013 more

  • Quaternary shortening at the Andean orogenic front (31°-33°S), Argentina: Current issues and challenges

    Quaternary shortening at the Andean orogenic front (31°-33°s), Argentina: Current issues and challenges

     Carlos Costa1, Emilio Ahumada1, Benjamin Brooks2, Andrew Meigs3, Lewis Owen4, Thomas Rockwell5, Lindsay Schoenbohm6, Carlos Gardini1, Héctor Cisneros1, Fabricio Vázquez1, 7

    1. Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Argentina. costa@unsl.edu.ar
    2. U.S. Geological Survey, USA
    3. Oregon State University, USA
    4. University of Cincinnati, USA
    5. San Diego State University, USA
    6. University of Toronto, Canada
    7. CONICET

    Outstanding exposures, new data, and novel hypotheses developed during the last decade have turned the frontal deformation zone of the Andes between 31°S and 33°S (Fig. 1) into one of the most promising areas worldwide for improving the understanding on mountain building processes and seismic hazards related to thrust tectonics.

    Because the Andes are relatively narrow in these latitudes, the geodetic signal in the backarc is dominated by the subduction zone locking process at the Chile trench. Nonetheless the geodetic analysis provides some useful constraints on the location and rates of modern backarc shortening, though not necessarily on the vergence. It is currently understood that backarc shortening occurs at rates of ~4-5mm/yr over a zone that is ~30km wide (across-strike) (Brooks et al., 2003; Kendrick et al., 2006). In the north (31°- 32°10° S) this would imply that the west-vergent, Eastern Precordilleran structures are the most likely to be active, while south of 32°10° S the east-vergent structures in the Southern Precordillera belt are likely to be most active (Fig. 1).

    more

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