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What’s up? The Friday links (14)

Some good articles came up last week, and two interesting things happened in northwestern Europe. A small earthquake (M2.7-M3.4) hit northern Netherlands in the Groningen area and people claimed light house damages despite the low magnitude. The event was caused by natural gas production. The gas company, Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij (NAM), even has an online-formular for that!

The NSF came up with a nice article on the drilling offshore Costa Rica by the Joides Resolution. They hope to get insights in the generation of large earthquakes by analyzing their rock samples.

Earthquake report published an USGS report on sediment sampling of the Japan tsunamites. Great work!

Science daily reported that the flooding of the ancient Salton Sea may be linked to San Andreas earthquakes.

Highly Allochthonous came up with some new work on the Christchurch events.

The University of Texas at Austin had a good article on why the 2004 Sumatra mega-earthquake was that devastating.

A guy from Japan has filmed the Tohoku-tsunami from his car:

Here’s a new video documenting the effects of the Tohoku tsunami:

A team from Newcastle University is investigating geothermal energy in the UK, and the seem to plan injecting the water in a fault…. Good luck.

And finally, two cool videos from Hawaiian volcanoes, just because it’s so beautiful:

Have a nice weekend!

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Christoph Grützner

Christoph Grützner

works at the Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge. He likes Central Asia and the Mediterranean and is looking for ancient earthquakes.

See all posts Christoph Grützner

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