Posts in the category »   «  ( 110 Posts )

  • Tectonic Studies Group field trip to Death Valley, April 2017

    The Tectonic Studies Group (TSG) will organise a field trip to Death Valley in April 2017. The trip will be of particular interest for those who wish to learn more about tectono-volcanic processes, tectono-sedimentary processes, and the Basin and Range/ San Andreas system.

    The trip is being organised and delivered by Phil Benson & Derek Rust of the University of Portsmouth. more

  • Special Session at SSA2017 in Denver on Toppled and Rotated Objects

    A special session on Toppled and Rotated Objects in Recent, Historic, and Prehistoric Earthquakes will be held during the upcoming 2017 Annual Meeting of the Seismological Society of America in Denver, Colorado from 18-20 April 2017.  Session Chairs will be Klaus-G. Hinzen and Rasool Anooshehpoor.

    The main purpose of the session is to bring together researchers with diverse backgrounds (e.g., seismology, engineering, history, heritage conservation) who are interested in the behavior of objects, monuments, or simple structures during earthquakes and the stories which deformed, rotated or toppled objects can tell. The session will cover all aspects of toppled or rotated objects or simple structures which have suffered heavy deformation or damage during earthquakes. Topics will include: (1) observations, (2) documentation, (3) model building, (4) restoration, (5) mapping, and (6) correlation with geology.

    Recent earthquake research has postulated correlation between the reaction of objects (monuments, columns, tombstones, etc.) and the seismic source in addition to local effects due to geological site conditions. As the laws of physics are time invariant, knowledge gained in reconnaissance surveys from well-studied instrumental earthquakes can reveal information about ground motions during historical and prehistorical earthquakes. Particular interest will be directed to man-made structures; however, due to similarities of the techniques used to study precariously balanced rocks and speleothems, contributions from these fields are also welcome.

    The deadline for all proposed presentations, invited or otherwise, is 5 pm PST January 11, 2016.  All abstracts must be submitted by the deadline. Submitting abstracts through the online submission system only (There is a submission fee of $80 for regular attendees, $40 for students).

     

    There are lots of other interesting sessions on earthquake geology, paleoseismology and related topics at the SSA meeting, make sure to check the full programme: http://meetings.seismosoc.org/special-sessions/

  • PhD Position in Coastal Paleoseismology at University of Southern Mississippi

    Here’s an interesting opportunity in coastal paleoseismology:

    The Division of Marine Science at the University of Southern Mississippi (NASA Stennis Space Center location) invites applications for a four-year PhD position in coastal paleoseismology starting no later than August 2017.  This is an NSF funded project that aims to recover stratigraphic records of past earthquakes and tsunamis along the Hikurangi subduction margin, New Zealand.  The project is part of a wider study on Hikurangi margin geodynamics, and the student will have the opportunity to attend workshops where we aim to integrate coastal paleoseismology with a wide variety of other geological and geophysical datasets.  The ideal candidate will possess a skillset that includes: quantitative micropaleontology, paleoenvironmental reconstructions, sedimentology of coastal systems, and experience in adventurous fieldwork.  The candidate is required to have an MSc in geology, earth sciences, marine sciences, or a closely related discipline.

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  • Some great photo collections from the PATA Days 2016 in Colorado

    My dear colleagues Neta Wechsler, Stefano Pucci, and Oxana Lunina took some amazing photos during the PATA Days in Crestone, Colorado. Even better, they allowed me to distribute the links to their collections:

    Do you also have some photos that you’d like to share? Please feel free to link to your album in the comments section or drop me a mail.

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  • Those were the PATA Days 2016 in Crestone, CO

     

    The 7th International INQUA Workshop on Paleoseismology, Active Tectonics and Archaeoseismology (PATA Days) took place last week in Crestone, CO. The meeting was organised by Jim McCalpin who did an amazing job – thanks Jim for inviting us to Crestone and for this wonderful conference. Prior to the meeting a six-day road trip to the Faults of the Wild West lead a group of ~20 people to the legendary sites of western US faults: Borah Peak, the Tetons, Wasatch, etc. On 29 May most participants gathered in Denver where the icebreaker took place. Early in the morning next day we started with a pre-meeting field trip to Crestone, driving into the Rocky Mountains, passing South Park, and arriving at Crestone just on time for lunch. more

  • PATA Days program out now!

    Dear friends and colleagues,

    The 7th PATA Days will start in a few days and the scientific program is out now: Program PATA Days (1.5 MB, PDF). Jim McCalpin just told us that the weather is still somewhat challenging so bring your warm jumper and your waterproofs for the field trips. See you all very soon in Colorado!

     

  • IRSN report on the Napa Earthquake, California (M6, 2014-08-24)

    Our colleagues Stéphane Baize and Oona Scotti from the French IRSN finished a report on the 2014 Napa Earthquake: Post-seismic survey report, with special focus on surface faulting. On 24 August 2014, an earthquake of magnitude Mw6 occurred on the West Napa Fault in shallow depth. The quake caused significant damage, an interesting pattern of surface ruptures, and the immediate attention of hundreds of geologists. The primary and secondary effects were mapped only hours after the event, which turned out to be extremely important – a large amount of afterslip was recorded in the following days. The earthquake was not only recorded by a huge seismometer network, but the ground motion was also captured by GPS sensors and InSAR images. The new IRSN report is especially concerned with the surface faulting hazard, since this agency is responsible for the safety of nuclear installations in France.  more

  • 7th PATA Days, Crestone, CO, 30 May – 03 June, 2016

    Dear friends and colleagues,

    The 7th International Workshop on Paleoseismology, Active Tectonics, and Archaeoseismology (PATA Days) will be held in the USA from 30 May – 03 June, 2016. The workshop is sponsored by the INQUA-TERPRO Commission and mainly organized by James McCalpin. The workshop includes several excursions and we welcome presentations on a broad list of topics related to seismic hazards and active tectonics: more

  • New papers on Paleoseismology and Geoethics

    Several new studies have been published recently on old earthquakes and their geological footprint – time to list them and to recommend reading. Additionally, today’s paper digest also lists several articles which are not about paleoseismology, but geoethics. These papers were published in a special volume of GSL. They cover subjects that many paleoseismologists will have dealt with in the past or are likely to deal with in the future  – seismic risk perception, science communication, public outreach, and communicating uncertainties. One paper is dedicated to the L’Aquila trial. I find it very telling that this issue is not open access. Obviously, strengthening “public trust in geosciences” has still a long way to go…

    Here are the latest papers:

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  • New paper: Evolution of dilatant faults in the Canyonlands NP, Utah

    The Canyonlands National Park, Utah, is famous for its beautiful landscape and spectacular landforms. For many geoscientists it is also well-known as a sandstone reservoir analogue and as a tourist you’ll often run into groups of geologists on field trips. It’s a matter of debate how and how fast the beautiful grabens in the Needles Fault zone formed – these are large arcuate canyons several tens of kilometres in length, paralleling the Colorado River. In a new paper we present results from remote sensing, mapping, and georadar (GPR). Our aim was to better understand the coupling between deformation, erosion and deposition in such an active system. Based on our findings we developed a model of graben formation and describe the geometry of the dilatant faults at depth. We argue that either the grabens are older than previously assumed or that sedimentation rates were much higher in the Pleistocene.

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