Posts in the category »   «  ( 31 Posts )

  • Int’l Palaeoseismological Field Workshop ‘Soft-sediment deformation structures & palaeoseismic phenomena in the SE Baltic Region’ – 2nd announcement out now

    The 2nd announcement for the International Palaeoseismological Field Workshop ‘Soft-sediment deformation structures and palaeoseismic phenomena in the South-eastern Baltic Region’ is out now. Download the PDF here and check this website for more informatin on the project. The workshop will be held from 17 – 21 September, 2018, and is organised by the Lithuanian Geological Survey, Lithuanian Geological Society,  Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, and Klaipėda University.

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  • Stuff to read: New literature on paleoseismology and active tectonics

    Is it just me or is the frequency of papers being published increasing…? Anyway, here’s the literature update with studies on paleoseismology and active tectonics. Today we have: Faulting in the Canyonlands, seismites from the Jurassic, a fake earthquake in Cologne, dynamic triggering, news from the San Jacinto Fault, ground motion variation between repeating earthquakes, metrics to evaluate seismic hazard maps, submarine tectonic geomorphology, the 1897 Great Assam Earthquake, and a collection of papers on geophysical imaging and interpretation of outcrops. Enjoy!

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  • Paleoseismology Through Sedimentology

    The Megablock Complex: An example from the East African Rift

    Recognizing and interpreting seismite horizons (soft-sediment deformation generated by earthquakes) preserved in the sedimentary record is an underappreciated approach for paleoseismic analysis. The addition of sedimentological studies to a toolkit that includes other well-established methods, such as instrumental seismic monitoring and fault trenching, can provide a less expensive and more practical option for earthquake hazard prediction and preparation in certain areas. For example, this may be a good option in less developed regions and in areas where fault trenching may not be possible. Moreover, there is a lot that we can learn rheologically from the study of seismites that could be invaluable for modeling the behavior of the surface/near-surface during seismic activity. Similarly, investigating Quaternary strata in areas that may be prone to seismicity, which may or may not have a recorded history of major earthquakes, can illuminate important information about earthquake recurrence patterns and intervals, in much the same way as fault trenching. more

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