AGU2017 session on earthquake ruptures

The following AGU session is of potential interest to the paleoseismology community:

Earthquake Rupture Processes, Confronting Field Observations and Models (25767)

Session Description

In recent years, combined progresses in our understanding of earthquake mechanics and computation capabilities have allowed to develop numerical models that address earthquake mechanics at a variety of scales, from fault segmentation to co-seismic off-fault damage.

These theoretical progresses can potentially suggest new observations that can be tested by field or geodetic studies. In parallel, innovative technics in earthquake geology and active tectonics have allowed for a significant improvement in our capacity of detailed observation of earthquake ruptures. Hence, it is time to confront high-resolution observations with numerical and theoretical models to test these models and see in which direction observation should go. We welcome contribution testing earthquake mechanic models based on observational data (geodesy, field data…) as well as contribution suggesting new potential field observation, based on theoretical or numerical developments.

Primary Convener:  Yann Klinger, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, France 
Convener:  Marion Thomas, University of Oxford, UK

Surface ruptures of the 1891 Nobi earthquake

At the XIX INQUA congress in Japan I had the chance to see the surface ruptures of the 1891 Nobi earthquake during the mid-congress excursion M-2. This quake caused huge damage, but more interestingly for me, it produced amazing surface ruptures which are preserved even more than a hundred years after the event. The M7.5-M8 quake occurred in a mountainous area and was mainly strike-slip (more than 8 m!), but significant vertical uplift was found at step-overs. In 1991, the wonderful Neodani Fault Museum opened to the public, its main attraction being a paleoseismological trench exhibiting more than 5 m of vertical offset! Simply astonishing. Thanks to Atsumasa Okada, Heitaro Kaneda and Keitaro for this great excursion! Continue reading “Surface ruptures of the 1891 Nobi earthquake”