New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (May 2016)

Today’s paper round-up covers a very wide spectrum of earthquake related studies. We have work on tsunamis, turbidites, and lake paleoseismology, paleoseismological data from Asia, Archaeoseismology, mud volcanoes, the ESI-2007 scale, and an explanation on what the rise of the Andes is driven by. Enjoy reading!

Continue reading “New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (May 2016)”

New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Apr 2016)

This is the April edition of my paper round-up. Today I recommend papers on high-resolution topography data, fault mechanics, earthquake environmental/archaeological effects (liquefaction, rotated objects, landslides), Quaternary dating, a fault database for Asia, and tectonics of New Zealand and Martinique. Enjoy! Continue reading “New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Apr 2016)”

Guest blog by Sascha Schneiderwind (RWTH Aachen University): Multiparametric trenching investigations

[Update 15 February 2017: Since Sascha is an author here now, the post was attributed to him.]
Greece is one of the main targets of RWTH Aachen’s Neotectonics & Geohazards group. They worked on paleo-tsunamis, active faults on the Peloponnese, in Attica, and on Crete, and on the application of terrestrial LiDAR and shallow geophysics for active tectonics research. In their latest paper, Sascha Schneiderwind et al. developed a methodology to aid paleoseismic trenching studies. They use t-LiDAR and georadar to better and more objectively characterise lithological units. His paper includes nice examples from Crete and from the famous Kaparelli Fault. Here is his guest blog: Continue reading “Guest blog by Sascha Schneiderwind (RWTH Aachen University): Multiparametric trenching investigations”

Guest blog by Bastian Schneider (RWTH Aachen University): Tsunami hazard in Muscat, Oman

Tsunamis are a very real threat in the Indian Ocean. Most people will immediately think of the 2004 tsunami and the Sumatra subduction zone, but the Arabian Sea has seen strong tsunamis in the past, too. In 1945, a major earthquake at the Makran Subduction Zone caused a large tsunami (Hoffmann et al., 2013a). In 2013, the on-shore Balochistan earthquake caused a submarine slide which in turn triggered a tsunami that reached the coast of Oman (Heidarzadeh & Satake, 2014; Hoffmann et al., 2014a). There is also evidence for paleotsunamis along Oman’s coast (Hoffmann et al., 2013b; Hoffmann et al., 2014b). Now a team of scientists from RWTH Aachen University (Germany) and GUtech (Muscat, Oman) have published a tsunami inundation scenario for Muscat (Schneider et al., 2016). This is lead author Bastian Schneider’s guest blog on this research: Continue reading “Guest blog by Bastian Schneider (RWTH Aachen University): Tsunami hazard in Muscat, Oman”

New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Feb 2016)

Here’s the February edition of my paper recommendations. This time we have:

  • Paleoseismology in Germany and Nepal (the latter with a focus on charcoal dating techniques),
  • Tsunamis in Greece, Portugal, Israel and Alaska,
  • Turbidites in Portugal,
  • New insights into the geodynamics of Mozambique,
  • Fault rheology in Iran,
  • Rupture jumps on strike‐slip faults, and
  • A MATLAB tool for seismic hazard calculations.

Enjoy!

Continue reading “New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Feb 2016)”

7th PATA Days, Crestone, CO, 30 May – 03 June, 2016

Dear friends and colleagues,

The 7th International Workshop on Paleoseismology, Active Tectonics, and Archaeoseismology (PATA Days) will be held in the USA from 30 May – 03 June, 2016. The workshop is sponsored by the INQUA-TERPRO Commission and mainly organized by James McCalpin. The workshop includes several excursions and we welcome presentations on a broad list of topics related to seismic hazards and active tectonics: Continue reading “7th PATA Days, Crestone, CO, 30 May – 03 June, 2016”

Guest blog: “Photogrammetry for Paleoseismic Trenching” by Nadine Reitman (USGS)

Error analysis

A few weeks ago, Nadine Reitman (USGS) published an interesting paper about the use of Photogrammetry for Paleoseismic Trenching in BSSA. In this guest blog she shares her key findings and explains how to minimise errors without spending too much time measuring control points. Thanks Nadine!

Structure-from-motion (SfM) is now routinely used to construct orthophotos and high-resolution, 3D topographic models of geologic field sites. Here, we turn SfM on its side and use it to construct photomosaics and 3D models of paleoseismic trench exposures. Our results include a workflow for the semi-automated creation of seamless, high resolution photomosaics designed for rapid implementation in a field setting and a new error analysis of SfM models. Continue reading “Guest blog: “Photogrammetry for Paleoseismic Trenching” by Nadine Reitman (USGS)”

Paleoseismology & Tsunami papers – Christmas edition

This is this year’s last issue of my paper round-up, and it includes some pretty interesting stuff. Our Greek colleagues published a report on the liquefaction caused by the 2014 Lefkada earthquakes, just in time with the recent earthquake that hit more or less the same area again (Papathanassiou et al., and see earlier posts here). Long et al. published a paper on iceberg-induced tsunamis, found in the sedimentary record – that’s a great story, isn’t it? Jacobson’s PhD on the Lake Heron Fault (NZ) is an interesting read, and Iván Sunyol’s paper on paleoseismological trenches in Mexico is especially interesting for those who attended the 2012 Morelia meeting. Zhou et al. come up with a great dataset of Pléiades imagery from the El Mayor-Cucapah Quake, Calais et al. have a close look on the northeastern Caribbean, and finally, Kufner et al.’s paper is about the collision between India and Asia deep below the Pamir and Hindu Kush.

Enjoy reading and Merry Christmas!

Continue reading “Paleoseismology & Tsunami papers – Christmas edition”