Paleoseismology field trip at the International Conference on Astronomy & Geophysics in Mongolia, 2017

This meeting in Mongolia will include a very nice paleoseismological field trip! This is the conference website: http://www.iag.ac.mn/mn/index.php?pid=107 and here is the announcement:

The Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics (IAG) of the Mongolian Academy of Sciences invites colleagues, geoscientists, researchers, and international experts from around the world to attend the “The International Conference on Astronomy & Geophysics in Mongolia, 2017” and we hope that you enjoy the scientific program and field-excursion, as well as the hospitality in capital Ulaanbaatar and field-excursions!
The conference will have two sections. The main section will be held in Ulaanbaatar, the capital of Mongolia, between 20 and 22 July of 2017 including the celebration of 60th anniversary of IAG, plenary session, oral and poster sessions. The field section “Field-excursion to Mogod co-seismic fault rupture area” (1967/01/05, Mw=7.1) will be held at Mogod soum of Bulgan province, Mongolia between 23 and 26 July, 2017.

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New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Dec 2016)

A continuous flow of images from the New Zealand earthquake reaches the earthquake geology community, and we’re probably all amazed by the coseismic offsets and other earthquake effects. However, the flow of papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics also does not stop and here is my digest for December. Enjoy reading!

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Special Session at SSA2017 in Denver on Toppled and Rotated Objects

A special session on Toppled and Rotated Objects in Recent, Historic, and Prehistoric Earthquakes will be held during the upcoming 2017 Annual Meeting of the Seismological Society of America in Denver, Colorado from 18-20 April 2017.  Session Chairs will be Klaus-G. Hinzen and Rasool Anooshehpoor.

The main purpose of the session is to bring together researchers with diverse backgrounds (e.g., seismology, engineering, history, heritage conservation) who are interested in the behavior of objects, monuments, or simple structures during earthquakes and the stories which deformed, rotated or toppled objects can tell. The session will cover all aspects of toppled or rotated objects or simple structures which have suffered heavy deformation or damage during earthquakes. Topics will include: (1) observations, (2) documentation, (3) model building, (4) restoration, (5) mapping, and (6) correlation with geology.

Recent earthquake research has postulated correlation between the reaction of objects (monuments, columns, tombstones, etc.) and the seismic source in addition to local effects due to geological site conditions. As the laws of physics are time invariant, knowledge gained in reconnaissance surveys from well-studied instrumental earthquakes can reveal information about ground motions during historical and prehistorical earthquakes. Particular interest will be directed to man-made structures; however, due to similarities of the techniques used to study precariously balanced rocks and speleothems, contributions from these fields are also welcome.

The deadline for all proposed presentations, invited or otherwise, is 5 pm PST January 11, 2016.  All abstracts must be submitted by the deadline. Submitting abstracts through the online submission system only (There is a submission fee of $80 for regular attendees, $40 for students).

 

There are lots of other interesting sessions on earthquake geology, paleoseismology and related topics at the SSA meeting, make sure to check the full programme: http://meetings.seismosoc.org/special-sessions/

Special Issue in Annals of Geophysics on the Amatrice earthquakes

Annals of Geophysics has just published a special issue on the devastating Amatrice Earthquake series in Central Italy: Vol 59, Fast Track 5 (2016): The Amatrice seismic sequence: preliminary data and results.

The special issue, edited by Marco Anzidei and Silvia Pondrelli, contains lots of field reports, first assessments, and plenty of primary data. Plus, it’s all OPEN ACCESS! Continue reading “Special Issue in Annals of Geophysics on the Amatrice earthquakes”

Session on paleoseismology at the TSG-VMSG-BGA Joint Assembly (Liverpool, 4-6 Jan 2017)

The first joint assembly of the Tectonic Studies Group (TSG), Volcanic and Magmatic Studies Group (VMSG), and British Geophysical Association (BGA) will be held at the University of Liverpool from 4-6 January, 2017. Among the many interesting sessions the following one will be of special interest for … well … us:
S.12 – Earthquakes, palaeoseismology, and rates of fault slip: from milliseconds to millions of years. The session is chaired by Laura Gregory, Ed Garett, and Luke Wedmore, deadline for abstracts is 5 November. Continue reading “Session on paleoseismology at the TSG-VMSG-BGA Joint Assembly (Liverpool, 4-6 Jan 2017)”

New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Oct 2016)

A lot of new papers have been published on paleoseismology, earthquake geology, active tectonics and tsunamis last month. We have research on slowly deforming regions, on the active tectonics of Mexico, New Zealand, Armenia, and Iran, new data from the Kumamoto earthquake, plus some marine/coastal paleoseismology and tsunami studies. Enjoy reading!

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PhD Position in Coastal Paleoseismology at University of Southern Mississippi

Here’s an interesting opportunity in coastal paleoseismology:

The Division of Marine Science at the University of Southern Mississippi (NASA Stennis Space Center location) invites applications for a four-year PhD position in coastal paleoseismology starting no later than August 2017.  This is an NSF funded project that aims to recover stratigraphic records of past earthquakes and tsunamis along the Hikurangi subduction margin, New Zealand.  The project is part of a wider study on Hikurangi margin geodynamics, and the student will have the opportunity to attend workshops where we aim to integrate coastal paleoseismology with a wide variety of other geological and geophysical datasets.  The ideal candidate will possess a skillset that includes: quantitative micropaleontology, paleoenvironmental reconstructions, sedimentology of coastal systems, and experience in adventurous fieldwork.  The candidate is required to have an MSc in geology, earth sciences, marine sciences, or a closely related discipline.

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New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Sep 2016)

Today’s paper round-up has lots of tsunami papers, including one on the use of DNA to decipher paleo-tsunami deposits. Also, we have some papers about Italy, even from the area of the 24 August Amatrice earthquake. Enjoy reading and please don’t hesitate to tell me which papers I’ve missed.

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Studying the earthquake geology of the Chilik-Chon Kemin Fault Zone in Kazakhstan

The Chilik-Chon Kemin Fault Zone is a major left-lateral strike-slip fault zone in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan, just a few tens of kilometres east of Almaty and north of Lake Issyk Kul. It has seen one of the largest continental earthquakes ever recorded in 1889, with an estimated magnitude of ~M8.3. In July and August I had the chance to visit this fault zone for two weeks together with Angela Landgraf from Potsdam and Aidyn Mukambaev from the National Data Centre, thanks to a travel grant from COMET (thanks so much, COMET!) and with support from the EwF Project. We wanted to find out more details about the tectonic geomorphology of this fault zone and we wanted to study the slip rate and earthquake recurrence intervals. So we took our drone, shovels and picks and set off for a field trip into the mountainous wilderness. Since I will leave for another field trip to Kazakhstan (Dzhungarian Fault) tomorrow, I will leave you with some impressions from our field work and provide more information once the paper is published…
Enjoy!  Continue reading “Studying the earthquake geology of the Chilik-Chon Kemin Fault Zone in Kazakhstan”