Papers on harbours & archaeoseismology in the Med

While compiling the monthly paper round-up, I will of course miss some publications. This may be because I was in the field when the papers were published, because I don’t have an alert for the journals, or because my alerts didn’t include the right key words. For example, I missed a couple of 2017 papers by our colleagues from Mainz: Continue reading “Papers on harbours & archaeoseismology in the Med”

Special Issue in QI – Quaternary Earthquakes: Geology & Palaeoseismology for Seismic Hazard Assessment

Dear friends and colleagues,

We are happy to announce that our Special Issue from the 2015 PATA Days in Fucino is finally published in Quaternary International. This wonderful workshop commemorated the centenary of the 1915 Fucino Earthquake, and
we have seen some great active faults in the Central Apennines
and palaeoseismological research sites during the field trips. The meeting was organized by ISPRA, INGV and University of Insubria and promoted by INQUA TERPRO. Continue reading “Special Issue in QI – Quaternary Earthquakes: Geology & Palaeoseismology for Seismic Hazard Assessment”

Report on the Camerino 2017 INQUA Field Trip to the Central Apennine fault system

Report on the International Field Trip “From 1997 to 2016: three destructive earthquakes along the Central Apennine fault system”, 19th-22nd July 2017, Italy

Website: http://convegni.unicam.it/TDEq_centralItaly ( including program and abstracts, field trip guidebook and list of participants)

Authors: Chiara Frigerio1, Alessandro Maria Michetti1, Francesca Ferrario1, Franz Livio1, Emanuele Tondi2

1Università dell’Insubria, Dipartimento di Scienza ed Alta Tecnologia, Como, Italia

2Università di Camerino, Sezione di Geologia, Scuola di Scienze e Tecnologie, Italia Continue reading “Report on the Camerino 2017 INQUA Field Trip to the Central Apennine fault system”

AGU2017 session on earthquake ruptures

The following AGU session is of potential interest to the paleoseismology community:

Earthquake Rupture Processes, Confronting Field Observations and Models (25767)

Session Description

In recent years, combined progresses in our understanding of earthquake mechanics and computation capabilities have allowed to develop numerical models that address earthquake mechanics at a variety of scales, from fault segmentation to co-seismic off-fault damage.

These theoretical progresses can potentially suggest new observations that can be tested by field or geodetic studies. In parallel, innovative technics in earthquake geology and active tectonics have allowed for a significant improvement in our capacity of detailed observation of earthquake ruptures. Hence, it is time to confront high-resolution observations with numerical and theoretical models to test these models and see in which direction observation should go. We welcome contribution testing earthquake mechanic models based on observational data (geodesy, field data…) as well as contribution suggesting new potential field observation, based on theoretical or numerical developments.

Primary Convener:  Yann Klinger, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, France 
Convener:  Marion Thomas, University of Oxford, UK

New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Jul 2017)

Dear friends of active tectonics and paleoseismology,

Although the PATA Days in New Zealand are still five months away, it will be a long flight for most of us and I suggest to think about a good read on the plane already. Below you will find the latest publications that you may find interesting. If you prefer a good old hardcover book, why not buy Minoan Earthquakes right now? Enjoy reading! Continue reading “New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Jul 2017)”

Special issue on sub-aquatic paleoseismology

A special issue on sub-aquatic paleoseismology has been published in Marine Geology. The volume 384 ‘Subaquatic paleoseismology: records of large Holocene earthquakes in marine and lacustrine sediments‘ collects papers on marine and lacustrine mass movements that can be used to decipher the earthquake history. The contributions span a wide range of different settings, from the famous Cascadia sites to Greece, and are based on presentations from the International Sedimentological Congress in Geneva (August 2014) and the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco (December 2014). Continue reading “Special issue on sub-aquatic paleoseismology”

Minoan Earthquakes: Breaking the Myth through Interdisciplinarity

In a recent post on this forum, Angela Landgraf shared a digest of the long and winding road having led to the publication of Seismicity, Fault Rupture and Earthquake Hazards in Slowly Deforming Regions. Reading this post in the midst of wrapping up the edition of our Minoan Earthquakes volume, I could only sympathize with her concerns and hopes for the future of edited books at a time when impact factors and other author-level metrics all too often dictate academic choices.

Four years and a half (!) after the Out of Rubble Leuven workshop (29-30 November 2012), we are proud to announce the publication of Minoan Earthquakes: Breaking the Myth through Interdisciplinarity at Leuven University Press. Reasons for such delay are manifold but chief among them is our editorial choice of producing a coherent volume that might be used as an up-to-date toolbox for readers interested in the broader field of archaeoseismology – not just Minoan archaeoseismology – and its (necessary) relationship to other, better established, disciplines. This choice is reflected by the structure of the book and breadth of topics covered by its authors, ranging from seismology, paleoseismology, geophysics, architecture, engineering and, of course, Minoan archaeology. Although we will ultimately leave readers to judge how successful we were in this endeavor, we are encouraged by Iain Stewart’s appreciation of the volume: Continue reading “Minoan Earthquakes: Breaking the Myth through Interdisciplinarity”