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  • AGU2017 session on earthquake ruptures

    The following AGU session is of potential interest to the paleoseismology community:

    Earthquake Rupture Processes, Confronting Field Observations and Models (25767)

    Session Description

    In recent years, combined progresses in our understanding of earthquake mechanics and computation capabilities have allowed to develop numerical models that address earthquake mechanics at a variety of scales, from fault segmentation to co-seismic off-fault damage.

    These theoretical progresses can potentially suggest new observations that can be tested by field or geodetic studies. In parallel, innovative technics in earthquake geology and active tectonics have allowed for a significant improvement in our capacity of detailed observation of earthquake ruptures. Hence, it is time to confront high-resolution observations with numerical and theoretical models to test these models and see in which direction observation should go. We welcome contribution testing earthquake mechanic models based on observational data (geodesy, field data…) as well as contribution suggesting new potential field observation, based on theoretical or numerical developments.

    Primary Convener:  Yann Klinger, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, France 
    Convener:  Marion Thomas, University of Oxford, UK
  • New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Jul 2017)

    Dear friends of active tectonics and paleoseismology,

    Although the PATA Days in New Zealand are still five months away, it will be a long flight for most of us and I suggest to think about a good read on the plane already. Below you will find the latest publications that you may find interesting. If you prefer a good old hardcover book, why not buy Minoan Earthquakes right now? Enjoy reading! more

  • Special issue on sub-aquatic paleoseismology

    A special issue on sub-aquatic paleoseismology has been published in Marine Geology. The volume 384 ‘Subaquatic paleoseismology: records of large Holocene earthquakes in marine and lacustrine sediments‘ collects papers on marine and lacustrine mass movements that can be used to decipher the earthquake history. The contributions span a wide range of different settings, from the famous Cascadia sites to Greece, and are based on presentations from the International Sedimentological Congress in Geneva (August 2014) and the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco (December 2014). more

  • Minoan Earthquakes: Breaking the Myth through Interdisciplinarity

    In a recent post on this forum, Angela Landgraf shared a digest of the long and winding road having led to the publication of Seismicity, Fault Rupture and Earthquake Hazards in Slowly Deforming Regions. Reading this post in the midst of wrapping up the edition of our Minoan Earthquakes volume, I could only sympathize with her concerns and hopes for the future of edited books at a time when impact factors and other author-level metrics all too often dictate academic choices.

    Four years and a half (!) after the Out of Rubble Leuven workshop (29-30 November 2012), we are proud to announce the publication of Minoan Earthquakes: Breaking the Myth through Interdisciplinarity at Leuven University Press. Reasons for such delay are manifold but chief among them is our editorial choice of producing a coherent volume that might be used as an up-to-date toolbox for readers interested in the broader field of archaeoseismology – not just Minoan archaeoseismology – and its (necessary) relationship to other, better established, disciplines. This choice is reflected by the structure of the book and breadth of topics covered by its authors, ranging from seismology, paleoseismology, geophysics, architecture, engineering and, of course, Minoan archaeology. Although we will ultimately leave readers to judge how successful we were in this endeavor, we are encouraged by Iain Stewart’s appreciation of the volume: more

  • New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Jun 2017)

    Today’s paper list is rather long; presumably all the papers written during the winter are coming to publication now. We have lots of different topics today, so I will skip the summary and just say: Enjoy reading! more

  • PATA Days 2017: Registration is now open

    The registration for the 2017 PATA Days INQUA meeting (International meeting on Paleoseismology, Archaeoseismology & Active Tectonics) in New Zealand is now open. Safe the dates 13th – 16th November 2017 and make sure to check out the wonderful field trip options.

    Registration website: https://www.gns.cri.nz/Home/News-and-Events/Events/PATA/Registration

    See you all in New Zealand in November!

  • New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (May 2017)

    It’s just a few months after the Kaikoura earthquake and now the first papers have been published already. Today’s paper round-up also includes studies on dating tsunami boulders, turbidite paleoseismology, paleoseismology in the Tien Shan, the recent Italy and New Zealand earthquakes, and earthquakes and social media. Enjoy reading! more

  • Active faults around Cusco (Perú): field work on paleoseismology and archaeoseismology for project Cusco-PATA

    The city of Cusco in Perú has been hit by damaging earthquakes several times in its long history. In Inka times a strong earthquake destroyed parts of the city, and the Spanish invaders documented an earthquake that happened in 1650. Three hundred years later, in 1950, an earthquake destroyed large parts of modern Cusco and in 1986 a M6.1 event also led to damages in the city. In order to better understand the active normal faulting in the region, INGEMMET has launched the project Cusco-PATA (Paleoseismology, Archaeoseismology and Active Tectonics – “pata” also means “scarp” in Quechua). The project brings together scientists from Perú, Spain, France, and the UK. The 2017 field campaign started in mid-April with work on the archaeological sites in and around Cusco and paleoseismological trenching of the Pachatusan Fault. more

  • New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Apr 2017)

    Today in the paper round-up (April 2017): Active Tectonics of the Makran, postseismic deformation at Bam, active faults and paleoseismology in Italy, Switzerland & Alaska, the first papers on the Kaikoura earthquake, tsunamis in Chile and the Western Mediterranean, and faults in Mexico. Enjoy reading! more

  • New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Mar 2017)

    It is time for the monthly list of papers that could be interesting for the earthquake geology community. Lots of new papers this time, and too many different topics to list them in detail. Enjoy reading! more

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