Posts in the category »   «  ( 111 Posts )

  • Paper: The Canterbury earthquake sequence and earthquake environmental effects

    Now that the new dates for the 8th PATA Days 2017 in New Zealand are fixed, it is time to bring to your attention an exceptional paper that was already published in 2016. I planned to write a review long time ago, but I just managed to do so now. The paper by Quigley et al. is not only likely to become your favourite read during the long flight to New Zealand, but it will also serve as an extremely valuable contribution to the study of earthquake environmental effects (EEEs) in general. The authors report on, and summarise, the effects that the 2010-2011 Canterbury earthquake sequence had on the environment. The paper is special in many ways: more

  • New dates for 2017 PATA Days in NZ: 13 – 16 November, 2017

    We are pleased to announce new dates for the 2017 PATA Days Meeting: Monday 13th – Thursday 16th November, 2017.

    The meeting will be held in Blenheim, at the top of the South Island, at the northern end of the Marlborough Fault System and 30 km above the southern Hikurangi subduction zone. The first full day of the meeting will be a field trip to view some of the northern fault ruptures of the 2016 Kaikoura earthquake. This will be followed by three days of talks and presentations at conference venues in Ward and Blenheim. Meeting attendees are advised to arrive in Blenheim by the 12 November, and to arrange accommodation in Blenheim for 5 nights (12 – 17 November). There will also be an optional post-meeting field trip from Friday 17 – Sunday 19 November. The post-meeting field trip will start in Blenheim and finish in Christchurch. The meeting is supported by INQUA and the main annual event of the IFG EGSHaz.

    We look forward to welcoming you to New Zealand and sharing some science from our recently very active plate boundary. Find more information at the official conference website: https://www.gns.cri.nz/Home/News-and-Events/Events/PATA more

  • 8th PATA Days in New Zealand will be postponed to November 2017

    Dear friends and colleagues,

    We are very sorry to announce that the 8th PATA Days in New Zealand can not take place in April 2017. The meeting has to be postponed to November 2017. The Kaikoura Earthquake has not only shaken up the entire country, but also disrupted the organisation of the PATA Days. All NZ earthquake geologists are currently in the field and they will have to deal with the EQ aftermath for the next couple of months. It is just technically impossible to organise the meeting in April under these circumstances. It’s also going to be really hard to get the NZ sponsorship that we counted on, as funds from places like the Earthquake Commission will be diverted to the Kaikoura EQ response & follow up research.

    Of course, the field trip plans will also have to change completely. In November 2017 we will be able to see some of the most stunning effects of the Kaikoura Earthquake. In April, many roads will still be shut and many landowners will still be recovering and may not be amenable to curious scientists. By November next year, if we can incorporate some community outreach, then it will be much more appropriate to bring a field trip through the impacted area – pending open roads.

    We are very sorry for any inconvenience this may cause and we hope for your understanding. Currently the NZ organising team is working hard to fix new dates and locations. The official PATA website will be updated as soon as they’re back in office for a couple of hours.

    On behalf of the organisers,

    Christoph & the EGSHaz team

  • Preliminary Map of Co-Seismic Landslides for the M 7.8 Kaikoura, New Zealand Earthquake

    The M7.8 Kaikoura Earthquake in New Zealand produced one of the most complex ruptures ever observed, involving many different faults. Earthquake environmental effects include up to 10 m offset at the Kekerengu Fault, secondary ruptures, a tsunami, coseismic uplift, landslides and rockfalls, liquefaction, and maybe even earthquake lights. Lots of blogs and websites provide coverage on this earthquake, e.g. Geonet, the Landslide Blog, and The Trembling Earth. Our colleagues from the Research Group on Earthquake Geology in Greece worked on the landslides that happened during the earthquake. George Papathanassiou sent me the link to their Preliminary Map of Co-Seismic Landslides for the M 7.8 Kaikoura, New Zealand Earthquake. more

  • PhD Position in Coastal Paleoseismology at University of Southern Mississippi

    Here’s an interesting opportunity in coastal paleoseismology:

    The Division of Marine Science at the University of Southern Mississippi (NASA Stennis Space Center location) invites applications for a four-year PhD position in coastal paleoseismology starting no later than August 2017.  This is an NSF funded project that aims to recover stratigraphic records of past earthquakes and tsunamis along the Hikurangi subduction margin, New Zealand.  The project is part of a wider study on Hikurangi margin geodynamics, and the student will have the opportunity to attend workshops where we aim to integrate coastal paleoseismology with a wide variety of other geological and geophysical datasets.  The ideal candidate will possess a skillset that includes: quantitative micropaleontology, paleoenvironmental reconstructions, sedimentology of coastal systems, and experience in adventurous fieldwork.  The candidate is required to have an MSc in geology, earth sciences, marine sciences, or a closely related discipline.

    more

  • PATA Days 2017 in New Zealand – 1st circular out now

    Dear colleagues,

    The 8th PATA Days (Int’l workshop on Paleoseismology, Active Tectonics, Archaeoseismology) will be held in New Zealand from 3–9 April, 2017. The meeting will comprise scientific sessions, discussions, and a couple of very good field trips. Make sure to regularly check PATA2017.nz for updates.

    Now the first circular has been published, download it here as pdf: 1st circular

     

    See you all in New Zealand!

  • New papers on paleoseismology, active tectonics and tsunami research

    Several new papers deal with paleoseismology and active tectonics studies. Wiatr et al. used terrestrial LiDAR to analyse limestone bedrock scarps, Hornblow et al. investigated the Darfield earthquake source in NZ. Sarikaya et al. present new data on offset alluvial fans in Central Turkey; Xu et al. present geological data on two historical seismic events in Tibet. Tectonic morphology is used by Barcelona et al. in NW Argentina. Mathew et al. use remote sensing data to analyze coseismic deformation in China. Ed Garrett and colleagues present data on 1000 years of megathrust quakes in Chile, and Bemis et al. have an interesting article on UAVs and paleoseismology. more

  • 3He dating of rockfalls helps to distinguish between proximal and distal paleo-earthquakes in Christchurch, NZ

    The 2011 Christchurch earthquake series had severe consequences and surprised scientists for many reasons. Ground motions were extremely strong despite the relative moderate magnitudes of the quakes (MW 5.3-7.1). The events happened on a system of hitherto unknown faults, some of which are located directly below Christchurch. Earthquake environmental effects (EEE), especially liquefaction, were intense and widespread. It turned out that subsequent quakes reactivated the same feeder dikes of sand blows, showing that saturated sediments are susceptible of liquefaction no matter if they had been liquefied recently (also see the paper of Quigley et al. (2013) on the liquefaction effects). Another stunning lesson was the occurrence of intense rockfall in the vicinity of Christchurch. In a recently published study, Mackey and Quigley (2014) dated rockfall boulders with 3He and show that they allow to estimate the recurrence intervall of local seismic events like the 2011 series. This works is a very interesting way to use EEE for paleo-earthquake studies. more

  • PhD scholarships in Geophysics at Victoria University of Wellington, NZ

    Good news for students interested in a PhD on tectonics in New Zealand: John Townend announced that several scholarships are available. Deadline for application is 1 July 2014.

    PhD students are sought to work on several seismological and geophysical topics within the Institute of Geophysics, School of Geography, Environment, and Earth Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington (VUW). The geophysics group at Victoria University of Wellington has an established track record of research in seismology, tectonics, crustal geophysics, and structural geology. In the most recent Performance-Based Research Fund (PBRF) evaluation, Victoria University of Wellington was ranked first in New Zealand for research excellence and was also ranked first in New Zealand in Earth Sciences.  more

  • New earthquake and paleoseismology papers in SRL, J Struc Geol

    The latest issue of the Seismological Research Letters (SRL) has at least three papers dealing with topics interesting for paleoseismologists.

    Hinzen et al. studied the rotation of objects (e.g., monuments) during the L’Aquila earthquake of 2009. They scanned the rotated objects with a high-res laser scanner, built discrete-element-models from the data and simulated the shaking necessary to cause the deformation. The results help to better estimate earthquake parameters from earthquake archaeological effects (EAEs).

    more

The Network

The paleoseismicity.org directory is a list of the people who work on paleoseismology.

If you want to be listed here and if you fulfill the criteria, please fill this form.

See all Entries

Newsletter

Just click the "Unsubscribe" link which you find in every newsletter you get and your email adress will be removed from the subscribers list in seconds.

Facebook

Sharing Options

Digg this
Delicious
Stumbleupon
Reddit
Like us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter
Follow us on Google +
The paleosesismicity.org group on LinkedIn
Subscribe to the paleoseismicity Newsletter