International Palaeoseismological Field Workshop: Soft-sediment deformation structures and palaeoseismic phenomena in the South-eastern Baltic Region. Lithuania, 17-21 SEP, 2018

A paleoseismological field workshop on “Soft-sediment deformation structures and palaeoseismic phenomena in the South-eastern Baltic Region” will be held in Lithuania from 17-21 Septmeber, 2018. The workshop is organized by the Lithuanian Geological Survey, the Geological Society of Lithuania, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poland, and Klaipėda University, Lithuania. Continue reading “International Palaeoseismological Field Workshop: Soft-sediment deformation structures and palaeoseismic phenomena in the South-eastern Baltic Region. Lithuania, 17-21 SEP, 2018”

Paper: The Canterbury earthquake sequence and earthquake environmental effects

Now that the new dates for the 8th PATA Days 2017 in New Zealand are fixed, it is time to bring to your attention an exceptional paper that was already published in 2016. I planned to write a review long time ago, but I just managed to do so now. The paper by Quigley et al. is not only likely to become your favourite read during the long flight to New Zealand, but it will also serve as an extremely valuable contribution to the study of earthquake environmental effects (EEEs) in general. The authors report on, and summarise, the effects that the 2010-2011 Canterbury earthquake sequence had on the environment. The paper is special in many ways: Continue reading “Paper: The Canterbury earthquake sequence and earthquake environmental effects”

New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (July 2016)

Today’s paper round-up is rather short. Maybe this is due to the start of the field work season and many editors being involved in field research, maybe it’s just holiday season. Maybe I’ve missed some papers because I have been in the field, too. However, there are some very interesting studies, especially concerning tsunamis. Enjoy reading and please tell me what I’ve missed in the comments.

Continue reading “New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (July 2016)”

New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (June 2016)

It’s June and it’s time for a new paper round-up, isn’t it? When I compiled the list during the past weeks I already realized that there’s a lot of new literature out there, and I guess this month’s post is probably the longest list we’ve ever had – 21 articles! So here are the latest papers on paleoseismology, tsunamis (maaaany tsunami papers this time), and active tectonics. As always: Any suggestions are highly appreciated. Enjoy reading!

 

Continue reading “New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (June 2016)”

Paleoseismology, active tectonics, archaeoseismology, tsunamis: New papers you might want to read

Here is my latest update on paleoseismology-related literature. Plenty of new hot stuff has been published, today we have: archaeoseismology & liquefaction in Corinth, incredibly good data from the Gorkha earthqukae (Nepal), an earthquake that deviated the Po River, paleotsunamis in Israel and Taiwan, notes about tsunami boulders, and tsunamis in Greece. Enjoy!

 

Continue reading “Paleoseismology, active tectonics, archaeoseismology, tsunamis: New papers you might want to read”

2015 GSA Session “Estimating the Timing and Characteristics of Continental Earthquakes from Geologic Data”

The 2015 GSA Annual Meeting will be held in early November in Baltimore and since the deadline is approaching (11 August) it is time to check paleoseismology sessions. One of the many interesting sessions will be chaired by our colleagues Mark Quigley and Tim Stahl: “T186 – Estimating the Timing and Characteristics of Continental Earthquakes from Geologic Data”. Tim told me that there will be “some great invited speakers lined up speaking on paleoliquefaction, lake varve deposits and San Andreas fault paleoseismology“. Continue reading “2015 GSA Session “Estimating the Timing and Characteristics of Continental Earthquakes from Geologic Data””

Paleoseismological field work in Kyrgyzstan

A few weeks ago I spent ten days of field work in the Suusamyr Valley in Kyrgyzstan. In the framework of the EwF Project and COMET a team from Oxford (Eleanor Ainscoe, Austin Elliott, Richard Walker) and Kyrgyzstan (Kanatbek Abdrakhmatov, Azat Moldobaev) re-visited the epicentral area of the 1992 MS7.3 Suusamyr earthquake. This thrust earthquake is quite special for it produced intense and widespread secondary earthquake environmental effects (landslides, rockfalls, secondary ruptures, mud eruptions, etc.), but remarkably short primary surface ruptures only. Actually, surface ruptures of several metres height were found near the Suusamyr river, but limited to few hundreds of metres in length. Some 25 km to the west, another set of surface ruptures appeared, which were only about 1 m in height and less than 3 km long. Here are some impressions from our field work. Continue reading “Paleoseismological field work in Kyrgyzstan”

Report on the Mw7.1 Bohol, Philippines earthquake of 15 October 2013 by Stéphane Baize (IRSN)

On 15 October, 2013 a shallow Mw7.1 earthquake occured in Bohol, Philippines. The quake caused more than 200 fatalities and severe damages. Instrumental intensities of VIII – IX were recorded and the USGS estimates the maximum slip to be around 120 cm. Stéphane Baize from the French IRSN created a report not only on the seismological and tectonic background of the earthquake, but also on the earthquake environmental effects (EEEs) that were caused by the event. Continue reading “Report on the Mw7.1 Bohol, Philippines earthquake of 15 October 2013 by Stéphane Baize (IRSN)”

A mud volcano as an Earthquake Environmental Effect?

On 24 September a shallow M7.7 earthquake rattled Pakistan. At least 300 people died and thousands of houses, most of them adobe, collapsed in Balochistan Province. The quake was felt as far away as Muscat (Oman) and New Delhi (India). Epicentral intensities reached up to IX. The earthquake appeared to be a strike slip event. Soon the media reported on an amazing effect of the quake – in roughly 400 km distance a new island appeared few hundred meters off Gwadar. Continue reading “A mud volcano as an Earthquake Environmental Effect?”