Airborne LiDAR shows how the M 7.2 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake in Mexico changed the landscape

A very interesting paper by Oskin et al. (2012) published in Science (http://www.sciencemag.org/content/335/6069/702.full) a few days ago shows how the M 7.2 Mexico earthquake in April, 2010, has changed the landscape down to a few cm. The El Mayor–Cucapah earthquake produced a 120-kilometer-long multifault rupture through northernmost Baja California, Mexico. Continue reading “Airborne LiDAR shows how the M 7.2 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake in Mexico changed the landscape”

What’s up? The Friday links (29)

The sun dominated the geo-news this week. A very strong coronal mass ejection (or was it a sunquake…?) occured and hit Earth’s magnetic field on 24 January. A geomagnetic storm (Kp=5) lead to intense and beautiful northern lights around the Arctic Circle. The web is full of great images, the best ones that I came across can be found here at spaceweather and at National Geographic. Continue reading “What’s up? The Friday links (29)”

Cologne University – PhD position in Archaeoseismology available

The University of Cologne (Seismological Station Bensberg) invites applications for an open position as a Doctoral Student. An essential part of the research activities of the candidate will be dedicated to his/her work on a dissertation project. This work will be part of a research project on Archaeoseismological Studies in Midea and Tiryns, Greece concerned with the possible seismogenic cause of the decline of the great Mycenaean palaces of the Argolis.

Continue reading “Cologne University – PhD position in Archaeoseismology available”

The Wednesday Centerfault (1)

It’s not easy to prepare weekly Friday links when you are abroad, this is what I had to realize in April. However, I will try to post a natural beauty each Wednesday in the future, the Wednesday Centerfaults and Centerfolds.

Today, I start with the Kaparelli Fault in Greece (38.22°N, 23.23°E). This beautiful limestone fault scarp is more than 2.5 km long and up to 5 m high. The fault was activated during the 1981 Corinth earthquakes. Continue reading “The Wednesday Centerfault (1)”