Posts in the category »   «  ( 136 Posts )

  • New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Mar 2016)

    It’s only one month since my last paper update and yet I have nineteen interesting new studies for you. Today’s round-up includes tsunamis, tectonic geomorphology, environmental earthquake effects and soft sediment deformation, new techniques/technology, and some classic paleoseismology. Enjoy! more

  • Guest blog by Sascha Schneiderwind (RWTH Aachen University): Multiparametric trenching investigations

    [Update 15 February 2017: Since Sascha is an author here now, the post was attributed to him.]
    Greece is one of the main targets of RWTH Aachen’s Neotectonics & Geohazards group. They worked on paleo-tsunamis, active faults on the Peloponnese, in Attica, and on Crete, and on the application of terrestrial LiDAR and shallow geophysics for active tectonics research. In their latest paper, Sascha Schneiderwind et al. developed a methodology to aid paleoseismic trenching studies. They use t-LiDAR and georadar to better and more objectively characterise lithological units. His paper includes nice examples from Crete and from the famous Kaparelli Fault. Here is his guest blog: more

  • What’s up? The Friday links (76)

    Do you know your birthquake? And what do you think about animal behaviour before earthquakes? Did you hear about the NPG initative on an outsourced, but accelerated review process? Today is Good Friday, and here are your links!

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, active tectonics and tsunami research

    Several new papers deal with paleoseismology and active tectonics studies. Wiatr et al. used terrestrial LiDAR to analyse limestone bedrock scarps, Hornblow et al. investigated the Darfield earthquake source in NZ. Sarikaya et al. present new data on offset alluvial fans in Central Turkey; Xu et al. present geological data on two historical seismic events in Tibet. Tectonic morphology is used by Barcelona et al. in NW Argentina. Mathew et al. use remote sensing data to analyze coseismic deformation in China. Ed Garrett and colleagues present data on 1000 years of megathrust quakes in Chile, and Bemis et al. have an interesting article on UAVs and paleoseismology. more

  • New paper: Wiatr et al., 2013 – Slip vector analysis with high resolution t-LiDAR scanning

    A new paper in Tectonophysics deals with the use of terrestrial LiDAR for identifying the slip vectors on fault planes. Thomas Wiatr, Klaus Reicherter, Ioannis Papanikolaou, Tomás Fernandez-Steeger and Jack Mason collected and processed data from Crete island (Greece), where they scanned the scarp of the Spili Fault. They imaged numerous kinematic (slip direction) indicators like slickensides with this relatively new technique. The t-LiDAR data were then compared to traditional compass measurements in order to get an idea about the derivation betwen old-school measurements and high-tech methods.  more

  • New papers: paleotsunamis in Oman, Tohoku-oki tsunami 2011 in Japan

    Two new tsunami papers have been published recently, and I am happy to be co-author of one of them. In Hoffmann et al. 2012 we report on our observations along the NE Omani coast between Fins and Sur. We found a ridge of imbricated boulders parallel to the coast, but in heights of several meters above m.s.l. on top of a cliff and dozens of meters inland. Also, extremely large blocks clearly stemming from the cliff were found. We used LiDAR to determine the mass of very large blocks (up to 40 t) and found this method to result in far lower weights than estimated with the classical method. more

  • What’s up? The Friday links (33)

    A very strange story happened in OC California some days ago (thanks @EricFielding for pointing me to that). A woman suffered serious burns because some rocks her kids found at a beach combusted spontaneously in her pocket. Immediately, a discussion started on twitter. What kind of rocks could that be? Hydrocarbon-bearing sediments? Coal? Phosphor? There have been some accidents with phosphor from World War II weapons that was washed upon the shore of the Baltic Sea. People confused it with amber. However, this is unlikely at California beaches. Mysterious rocks… more

  • PostDoc position in Quaternary Research/Paleoseismology, Lisboa, Portugal

    A postdoctoral position is open at ICIST-IST (Institute for Structural Engineering, Territory and Construction – Instituto Superior Tècnico) under the framework of the project FINDER – Fault Investigation with LiDAR for Earthquake Reassessment, PTDC/CTE-GIX/1138662009, funded by the Portuguese National Foundation for Science and Technology (FCT/MCTES). more

  • Excursion and field work in Greece – landslides, rock falls, fault scarps

    Since ten days I am in Greece now with a dozen of students. We started with an excursion in the western Peloponessus area and had a look at the regional tectonics, sedimentology (mainly Neogene Flysch units and young beach rocks), the large limestone horsts of Gavrovo and Ionian units, Ancient Olympia and recent mass movements. Then we began with field work for BSc, MSc and PhD theses. more

  • Take part in an experiment: Measuring tectonically offset features

    Folks at Arizona State University and San Diego State University are conducting a study to test the repeatability, accuracy, and precision of lateral displacement measurements derived from high-resolution topographic Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data. Please take a few minutes to participate! If you have any questions about the research or would like to use the materials as a classroom exercise, please feel free to email Barrett at jbsalisb@asu.edu.

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