What’s up? The Friday links (27)

Recently, scientists from Switzerland came up with the news that fractured bedrock might amplify earthquake shaking. The say they observed an increase by factor 10, which seems huge. I knew amplifying by sediment basins, but this is new to me.

100 years ago on 6 January, Alfred Wegener presented his continental drift theory for the first time. The Blogosphere was full with articles, among them: Continue reading “What’s up? The Friday links (27)”

New paper on the Japan 2011 tsunami and implications for paleotsunami research – Updated

Goto et al. published a short paper on the Japan 2011 tsunami and implications for paleotsunami research in Marine Geology: Goto, K., Chagué-Goff, C., Fujino, S., Goff, J., Jaffe, B., Nishimura, Y., Richmond, B., Sugawara, D., Szczuciński, W., Tappin, D.R., Witter, R.C., Yulianto, E., 2011: New insights of tsunami hazard from the 2011 Tohoku-oki event. Marine Geology, 290, 1-4, 46-50.

Continue reading “New paper on the Japan 2011 tsunami and implications for paleotsunami research – Updated”

What’s up? The Friday links (19)

Let’s start with some good news: The first two Galileo satellites (Natalia and Thijs) will be launched today from Kourou. It’s a little behind the schedule (6 years) and the entire project has become a little more expensive than previously thought (1,600,000,000 €), but who cares? It will provide 1 m GPS resolution! 1 m!!!

There is one more Archaeopteryx! Really! Soemone who does not want his name to be told handed out the fossil to scientists. After a thoroughly investigation of that great piece of Solnhofen Plattenkalk, the anonymous collector will get back his bird. No, his dinosaur I mean. Ehm, his Archaeopteryx.

Dave Petley reported on a giant landslide in Iceland. It’s expected to have ~1,000,000 m³. See the amazing images, just great.

Continue reading “What’s up? The Friday links (19)”

What’s up? The Friday links (14)

Some good articles came up last week, and two interesting things happened in northwestern Europe. A small earthquake (M2.7-M3.4) hit northern Netherlands in the Groningen area and people claimed light house damages despite the low magnitude. The event was caused by natural gas production. The gas company, Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij (NAM), even has an online-formular for that! Continue reading “What’s up? The Friday links (14)”

Japan earthquake aftermath – blogs and press

The Japan earthquake and tsunami have hit Japan harder than we could have imagined. Thousands are still missing, the death toll climbs and climbs, a nuclear disaster might happen or already happened, depending on who you ask, and the economical damages are incredibly high. Not only Japan was affected, but other countries as well feel the effects. Germany, for example, shut down seven of it’s oldest nuclear power plants and there’s a big debate on earthquakes and risks. The Geoblogosphere is still discussing lessons, estimations and consequences, and so are the official media. Here are some reports and opinions you should not miss. Continue reading “Japan earthquake aftermath – blogs and press”