PATA Days in Israel 19-27 September 2019 – save the date!

Dear friends and colleagues,

Please save the date for the 10th PATA Days in Israel: 19-27 September, 2019.

The pre-conference field trip from 19-22 September will lead to the Dead Sea and to Jerusalem, and we will see seismites, active faults, archaeoseismology, sinkholes, lake levels and tectonics. The main conference will be held from 22-27 September in Caesarea and the Sea of Galilee, including presentations, posters and half-day field trips focused on tsunamis, archaeoseismology and active faults!

See you all in sunny Israel!

The meeting will be supported by the INQUA/TERPRO Focus Group Earthquake Geology and Seismic Hazards (EGSHaz).

Guest blog by Elisa Kagan: New book on the Dead Sea Transform

A new book on the Dead Sea Transform has been published by Springer:

DEAD SEA TRANSFORM FAULT SYSTEM: REVIEWS

Together with Prof. Zvi Garfunkel and Prof. Zvi Ben-Avraham, I am a co-editor of this book. The book focuses on various aspects of the fault system, from geophysics, to tectonics, paleolimnology, hydrology, seismicity, and PALEOSEISMICITY. Most relevant to this blog are the papers by Agnon and by Marco & Klinger.

  • Shmulik Marco and Yann Klinger review in a new light the on-fault paleoseismic studies carried out along the DST.
  • Amotz Agnon delves into the off-fault seismite archives (lake, cave).

Here is a link to the book on the Springer site: http://link.springer.com/book/10.1007%2F978-94-017-8872-4

Continue reading “Guest blog by Elisa Kagan: New book on the Dead Sea Transform”

A 3,700 year old royal wine cellar discovered in Israel – destroyed by an earthquake?

Researchers have discovered the remains of a royal wine cellar at the Tel Kabri archaeological site in Northern Israel. They found ~40 crushed jars, which equals about 3,000 bottles, and they were able to analyse the chemistry of the organic traces from the jars. It’s clear that they contained red and white wine, which was spiced with “honey, mint, cinnamon bark, juniper berries and resins” as it was common 1,700 BC. The fact that all jars contained wine with the same chemical fingerprint led the researchers to conclude that the wine had a high quality and was, therefore, likely part of the Canaan palace’ reserve. This is already a pretty good story, but the New York Times also mentiones that “the cellar was destroyed 3,600 years ago in some violent event, perhaps an earthquake“. Yee-haw, archeoseismology! Here we go! But wait – what do we actually know about the earthquake? Continue reading “A 3,700 year old royal wine cellar discovered in Israel – destroyed by an earthquake?”

New papers – Minoan earthquakes, catastrophism, archaeoseismology in Israel, Costa Concordia

Currently I spend my time working on some papers that deal with tsunamis in the Eastern Mediterranean and earthquakes in Spain. Searching for literature and looking for data on the Minoan catastrophe I came across this new open access publication by Simon Jusseret and Manuel Sintubin:

Our colleagues from IGCP567 – Earthquake Archaeology put a lot of effort into getting rid of catastrophism and into making archeoseismology a more reliable, quantitative science. By the way, don’t miss the next workshop on archeoseismology and active tectonics in Mexico 2012! Continue reading “New papers – Minoan earthquakes, catastrophism, archaeoseismology in Israel, Costa Concordia”

Israel Journal of Earth Sciences: special issue on the Dead Sea Rift

I hope you have reserved some time for reading – here comes plenty of great new material on one of the most interesting tectonic features on earth, the Dead Sea Transform. The Israel Journal of Earth Sciences has published a special issue: The Dead Sea Rift as a natural laboratory for neotectonics and paleoseismology, Volume 58, Number 3 – 4. The papers are an outcome of the 2009 INQUA joint Israel/Jordan fieldtrip with the same name. I was lucky enough to have participated in that field trip. It was for sure one of the best field trips I ever had. Continue reading “Israel Journal of Earth Sciences: special issue on the Dead Sea Rift”

The Wednesday Centerfault (7)

This week’s centerfault is a very prominent one that you will know for sure – the Dead Sea Fault. The sinistral strike-slip fault marks the boundary between the Arabian plate and the Sinai. The entire system is more than 600 km long and has accommodated ~107 km of slip since Miocene. Magnitude 7 is no problem for this structure and the recurrence intervalls are short. Continue reading “The Wednesday Centerfault (7)”

New paper on the paleoseismicity of the Dead Sea – Kagan et al., 2011

Some days ago a new paper on the paleoseismicity of the Dead Sea area during the late Holocene has been published in JGR. Kagan et al, 2011 investigated two new study sites in the northern and southern parts of the Dead Sea Basin and compared the seismites found there with the information of the Ein Gedi core presented by Migowski et al., 2004.

Continue reading “New paper on the paleoseismicity of the Dead Sea – Kagan et al., 2011”