14th International Conference of the Geological Society of Greece – deadline 30 Sept.

Greece is a Disneyland for neotectonics and active faulting research. Some of the most important findings in earthquake science have been achieved in Greece, its historical catalogue is one of the longest on Earth, and paleoseismology, archaeoseismology & tsunami studies are abundant. These are many good reasons to consider registration for the 14th Int’l Conference of the Geological Society of Greece (Thessaloniki, May 25-27, 2016), especially since the programme is full of earthquake science stuff. The deadline for submitting papers is September 30.

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New papers on paleoseismology, active tectonics and tsunami research

Pissia Fault scarp

Several new papers deal with paleoseismology and active tectonics studies. Wiatr et al. used terrestrial LiDAR to analyse limestone bedrock scarps, Hornblow et al. investigated the Darfield earthquake source in NZ. Sarikaya et al. present new data on offset alluvial fans in Central Turkey; Xu et al. present geological data on two historical seismic events in Tibet. Tectonic morphology is used by Barcelona et al. in NW Argentina. Mathew et al. use remote sensing data to analyze coseismic deformation in China. Ed Garrett and colleagues present data on 1000 years of megathrust quakes in Chile, and Bemis et al. have an interesting article on UAVs and paleoseismology. Continue reading “New papers on paleoseismology, active tectonics and tsunami research”

Call for papers: Special Issue of the International Journal of Earth Science on Eastern Mediterranean Tectonics

The GeoFrankfurt conference took place a few days ago. Due to the large amount of work presented on Eastern Mediterranean Tectonics, a special issue on this topic will be published in the International Journal of Earth Sciences (former Geologische Rundschau). Paris Xypolias allowed me to circulate the call for papers: Continue reading “Call for papers: Special Issue of the International Journal of Earth Science on Eastern Mediterranean Tectonics”

First paper on the earthquake environmental effects of the 2014 Cephalonia (Greece) M6.0 quakes

On 26 January and 3 February, 2014, two strong and shallow strike-slip earthquakes of magnitude 6+ occured beneath the island of Cephalonia in Western Greece. Both events caused intense damage to buildings and infrastructure. A team of Greek geologists mapped earthquake environmental effects (EEE) such as liquefaction, road failures, rock falls, small/medium size landslides and stonewall failures. The results are now published in a paper in Tectonophysics. Continue reading “First paper on the earthquake environmental effects of the 2014 Cephalonia (Greece) M6.0 quakes”

A Mw6.9 earthquake in the Aegean Sea

Today (2014-05-24) on 09:25 UTC an earthquake with magnitude MW6.9 occurred in the NE Aegean Sea. The EMSC reports a depth of 27 km (USGS: 10 km). The quake had a (right-lateral) strike-slip mechanism and was felt as far away as Athens, Istanbul, and Sofia. More than 200 people were injured, most of them only lightly, and moderate damage to dozens of houses has been reported. The earthquake occurred on the (S)Western part of the North Anatolian Fault in the Samos Basin and was among the strongest events that have ever been recorded at that segment. Continue reading “A Mw6.9 earthquake in the Aegean Sea”

Crete and mainland Greece Fieldwork, March 2014

Uplifted algal rims at Sougia.

During the month of March 2014, Sascha and I along with Tobi and Lauretta (BSc students from RWTH University) were in Greece for fieldwork. The fieldwork campaign started on the island of Crete; our institute at RWTH Aachen has a joint project with Mainz University to carry out paleotsunami investigations on the island. The western part of Crete was uplifted by approximately 9 m during the 21st July AD 365 earthquake and also hit by the associated tsunami. Due to the strong seismic and highly tsunamigenic activity of the nearby Hellenic Trench, it is suggested that numerous earlier tsunamis have also struck the island. Continue reading “Crete and mainland Greece Fieldwork, March 2014”

Invited talk at RWTH Aachen University: Seismic Environmental Effects triggered by the January and February 2014 Cephalonia Earthquakes

Aachen

On Monday, 31 March, our colleague and friend George Papathanassiou from Aristotle University of Thessaloniki will give an invited talk about Seismic Environmental Effects triggered by the January and February 2014 Cephalonia Earthquakes. The presentation will start 2:00 pm at RWTH Aachen University, Lochnerstr. 4-20, 52064 Aachen, room 217. Please download the flyer here, guests are welcome.

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Preliminary report on the earthquake environmental effects triggered by the Cephalonia quakes

A team of geologists mapped the earthquake environmental effects (EEEs) of the two M6+ events that occurred at the Greek Island of Cephalonia on 26 January and 3 February, 2014. G. Papathanassiou, A. Ganas, S. Valkaniotis, M. Papanikolaou and S. Pavlides participated in these field campaigns. George Papathanassiou sent me the preliminary report today. The team found widespread evidence for “liquefaction, road-fill failures, rock falls, small landslides and stonewall failures“. Continue reading “Preliminary report on the earthquake environmental effects triggered by the Cephalonia quakes”

Some photos of EEEs caused by the Cephalonia M6.0 earthquake

On 26 January and 3 February, two strong and shallow earthquakes of magnitude 6+ occured at the island of Kefalonia/Cephalonia in Western Greece. The events caused intense damage to buildings and infrastructure. A team of EERI (Earthquake Engineering Research Institute) scientists went to the island to map these kind of damages. Earthquake Environmental Effects (EEE) like rockfalls, landslides, and lateral spreading were also caused by the events. George Papathanassiou and his colleagues mapped these features and sent me the following photos from Lixouri. Continue reading “Some photos of EEEs caused by the Cephalonia M6.0 earthquake”