Posts in the category »   «  ( 44 Posts )

  • PhD position at GFZ Potsdam in Active Tectonics

    An interesting PhD position is open at GFZ Potsdam in the framework of the CRC1211- “Earth: evolution at the dry limit”. CRC1211 has the objective to study the mutual evolutionary relationships between earth surface processes and biota in arid to hyperarid conditions. Within the framework of project C05 “Adaptation of drainage to tectonic forcing”, the history of the macro‐scale drainages of the Atacama Desert will be examined using cosmogenic nuclide and amphipod speciation chronologies, combined with topographic analysis and kinematic modelling. Findings will be compared to the established broad‐scale tectonic and climatic context. More information and the link to the ad can be found here. Deadline for application is 15th October 2020. For further queries relating to the role’s responsibilities you can contact Dr. Pia Victor by email (pia.victor@gfz-potsdam.de).

  • Special issue 20th anniversary of the Eastern Marmara Earthquakes: Active tectonics of continental strike-slip faults

    Continental strike-slip faults are complex structures on which the deformation is commonly distributed among a number of parallel to subparallel fault strands, making them in places significantly different in behaviour from their oceanic counterparts. Thus, the goal of this issue is to publish a collection of high-quality papers on active tectonics of continental strike-slip faults around the globe using various disciplines, including but not limited to, tectonic geomorphology, palaeoseismology, structural geology, crustal deformation, tectonic geodesy and seismology of continental strike-slip faults.

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, earthquakes, and active tectonics (July 2020)

    Time is flying, it feels as if I had posted the last paper updated just yesterday. However, a quick glance at the list shows that there are quite a few new studies that cover paleoseismology, seismic hazard, earthquake geology, etc. Let me know if I’ve missed something cool. Stay safe!

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  • This was the INQUA Summer School on Active Tectonics and Tectonic Geomorphology in Prague

    The INQUA Summer School on Active Tectonics and Tectonic Geomorphology was held in Prague from 24-27 September, 2019. This summer school was run by INQUA‘s IFG EGSHaz as part of the TERPRO commission. The event was hosted by the Institute of Rock Structure and Mechanics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Dpt. Neotectonics and Thermochronology. Main organizer was IFG co-leader Petra Štěpančíková. We would also like to thank MSc. Jakub Stemberk, Monika Hladká, Jana Šreinová, the deputy director Dr. Filip Hartvich, and all the staff involved for their professionalism and warm hospitality. Overall, 50 participants and 14 lecturers from 25 countries participated in the summer school.

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  • Registration now open for the INQUA Int’l Summer School on Tectonics & Tectonic Geomorphology, 24-27 Sep, 2019, Prague

    Register here for the INQUA International Summer School on Tectonics and Tectonic Geomorphology, 24-27 Sep 2019, Prague:

    ECR & DCR travel grants are also available! Note that no accommodation will be organised in Prague, but one night is included during the field trip.

  • New papers on paleoseismology, earthquakes, and active tectonics (Aug 2018)

    This time we have an impressive variety of earthquake study sites: Turkey, China, USA, Tadjik Basin, Italy, Japan, Sumatra, Himalayas, Spain, Mexico, Balkans, Mars, laboratory. Who could possibly ask for more? Plus some interesting work on fault physics. Check out the latest papers on earthquakes, active tectonics, and paleoseismicity:

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  • New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Jan 2018)

    I hope you’ve had a great start into the new year. A lot of new and exciting papers have been published at the end of the old one, including work on New Zealand and Europe. Enjoy reading and have fantastic new year 2018!

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  • Almaty sits on a huge active fault, and here is why we know

    Almaty, the former capital of Kazakhstan and home to ~2 million people, is a rapidly growing, vibrant city, beautifully situated at the foothills of the mighty Zailisky Alatau, the northernmost mountain range of the Tien Shan at this longitude. The city sits on a huge alluvial fan with the snow-capped mountains in the background, reaching 5,000 m elevation. Almaty has suffered from earthquakes in its young history: in 1887, the Verny earthquake with a magnitude of about 7.3 had its epicentre a few kilometres west of the city but did not produce surface ruptures (Verny is the old name of Almaty). Only two years later, the M8 Chilik earthquake ruptured the surface 100 km to the southeast of Almaty. Finally, Almaty was heavily damaged by the 1911 Chon Kemin earthquake with a magnitude of ~8, which occurred on the southern flank of the Zailisky Alatau. In our new paper we now report on a fault that did not rupture in historical times, but surely did so in the Holocene – and this fault is right beneath the city. more

  • Postdoctoral Research Assistant Position/ Upper plate deformation – Mexican subduction, available March 2017

    The following open position might be of interest to the paleoseismology community:

    “We are seeking a Postdoctoral Research Assistant for a 12 month fixed term appointment working on the exciting new UNAM-CONACYT-funded project on “Spatial and Temporal Variations of Upper Plate Deformation across the Guerrero portion of the Mexican Subduction Zone” at the Institute of Geography and the Environmental Geophysics University Laboratory (LUGA), National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), Campus Mexico City. The candidate will pursue fundamental and applied research into the assessment of both temporal and spatial vertical crustal deformation associated with both slow (interseismic) and rapid (coseismic) crustal deformation across the inner forearc region of the central Mexican subduction zone on the Guerrero sector, where the Cocos plate underthrusts the North American plate. The candidate will be responsible for the development and execution of laboratory and field research, conduct studies to develop a model of long-term deformation, writing reports and papers. more

  • This was my field work on active faults in Kazakhstan 2015 (pt. II)

    The first part of my report on the field work that I did in Kazakhstan this year focussed on the stuff we had done in the South. Here is part II which is all about the Dzhungarian Fault. You’ve never heard about this fault? That’s easily possible. There are only very few papers that deal with this fault. In the 1960s Soviet geologist V.S. Voytovich published results from extensive field work on this fault (Voytovich, 1965; 1969). 40-50 years later a few studies on geodesy and geodynamics covered the broader study area and Shen et al. (2003) did some work in the Chinese part of the fault, but it took until 2013 before Campbell et al. revisited the Kazakh side and came up with new field data. They focussed on the tectonic geomorphology of this structure and determined a slip rate. Given this little amount of research done one would assume that the fault is not very large and of minor importance, but the opposite is true. The fault is around 300 km long in its Kazakh section and probably twice as long in total! more

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