What’s up? The Friday links (22)

Emil Wiechert was born 150 years ago (26 December 1861). He not only invented modern Geophysics and Seismology, but he also had the first chair of Geophysics worldwide (1898 in Göttingen, Germany). Wiechert became famous for his seismograph. Now the Deutsche Post released a special stamp showing Wiechert, his seismograph and the original seismogram of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake as registered in Göttingen, Germany!

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Public version of the EEE Catalogue online!

The public version of the EEE Catalogue,  a global catalogue of environmental effects induced by modern, historical and paleoearthquakes, is available at http://www.eeecatalog.sinanet.apat.it/terremoti/index.php. This public version has been developed on Google Earth and aims at providing basic information at earthquake, locality and site level, including the rupture zones (when available) and the local description of environmental effects, integrated by some imagery (photographs, stratigraphic logs, etc.). Continue reading “Public version of the EEE Catalogue online!”

Where on GoogleEarth? WoGE #290

I found TannisWoGE #289 more or less by accident, just having a quick look and suddenly realizing that I am in the right area. It was more difficult to find some literature about the Bomapau and Kiriwina Islands. A great area, very high seismicity and a complex tectonic situation. Seems to be a fantastic destination for holidays as well, all those beautiful atolls must be great for divers. Continue reading “Where on GoogleEarth? WoGE #290”

The Wednesday Centerfault (5)

After we dealt with some faults in Greece, let’s move to Spain. The Ventas de Zafarraya Fault (VZF) west of the Granada basin (36.96° N, 4.14°W) has a beautiful morphologic expression and an exciting history. The fault bounds the Zafarraya polje to the south, with Quaternary sediments to the north (hanging wall) and limestones of the Internal Subbetics in the footwall. Continue reading “The Wednesday Centerfault (5)”

Paleoseismicity at the EGU2011

Now the EGU2011 in Vienna is over. Thousands of scientists have attended the meeting and more than 13,000 abstratcs were presented. Approx. 20,000 portions of Gulasz and 100,000 Wiener Schnitzels were served, hektoliters of wine and beer went down the throats of thirsty scientists. Some people say the EGU contributes with 10% to the income of Vienna’s bartenders. Several contributions dealt with paleoseismology, paleoseismicity, archeoseismology and paleotsunamis especially on Monday and Friday. Continue reading “Paleoseismicity at the EGU2011”

Buy an earthquake for charity

The World Geological Council (WGC) decided to “sell” earthquakes for charity. Similar to the names of low-pressure areas and high-pressure areas that you can buy from the meteorological agencies, everyone can now apply for buying the name of an earthquake as a gift to friends or relatives. The decision on the application is made by a control board of the WGC, the procedure will be managed by the USGS. The website BUY-AN-EARTHQUAKE.com will go online during the next weeks. All proceeds from this will be given for charity to help earthquake victims. Since the earthquake magnitude scale is logarithmic, rates will increase with increasing magnitude as well.

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