Three new papers: paleotsunamis, neotectonics in Greece; ESI2007 in Slovenia

Three papers published recently caught my eyes. First, Andrej Gosar investigated the earthquake environmental effects (EEEs) of the 12 April 1998 Mw =5.6 Krn Mountains earthquake, Slovenia. The quake measured VII-VIII on the EMS-98 scale, and Andrej found that the intensities reached the same values on the ESI2007 scale. He reports that the intensity distributions for both scales are comparable, but show some differences due to the sparsely populated epicentral area. The research concentrated on rockfalls for EEE determination. It’s a nice example that also moderate events can be characterized using the ESI2007 scale.

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SSA meeting in San Diego (& excursion to active faults!)

Klaus and me went to the SSA 2012 annual meeting in San Diego in April. The conference was great and very focussed. I really like that kind of rather small meetings, where almost everything is interesting for me. I saw a lot of interesting posters and great talks and especially liked the paleoseismology and archeoseismology sessions (of course!).

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3rd INQUA-IGCP 567 International Workshop on Active Tectonics, Paleoseismology and Archeoseismology, Morelia (Mexico), 18 – 24 November 2012

The 3rd INQUA-IGCP 567 International Workshop on Active Tectonics, Paleoseismology and Archeoseismology will be held in Morelia (Mexico) from 18 – 24 November 2012. The workshop is the continuation of the BaeloClaudia2009 and Corinth2011 events. We invite all scientists in the fields of earthquake geology, paleoseismology, archeoseismology, tsunami studies, earthquake engineering, seismic hazard assessment to participate in the workshop. We will try to provide travel grants from INQUA and IGCP for young scientists. See Acambay1912.org for detailled information, registration and abstract submission.

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PostDoc research position on Tsunami deposits, EQ Geology, Tectonics (Mexico)

The Group on Active Tectonics (GAT) and the Environmental Geophysics University Laboratory (LUGA) at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), Campus Morelia seeks applicants for a Postdoctoral Research position. The candidate will pursue fundamental and applied research into either a) active tectonics and/or b) tsunami deposits and paleoseismology with focus on the Mexican Subduction Zone. The candidate will be responsible for the development and execution of field and laboratory research, and to conduct studies on the geologic signature left by great earthquakes and their tsunamis. The fields of application include earthquake hazard, tsunami hazard and long-term earthquake record of this active margin.

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What’s up? The Friday links (29)

The sun dominated the geo-news this week. A very strong coronal mass ejection (or was it a sunquake…?) occured and hit Earth’s magnetic field on 24 January. A geomagnetic storm (Kp=5) lead to intense and beautiful northern lights around the Arctic Circle. The web is full of great images, the best ones that I came across can be found here at spaceweather and at National Geographic. Continue reading “What’s up? The Friday links (29)”

Saturday Geology Picture: Delphi, Greece

Delphi is one of the most impressive places I’ve ever seen. The landscape is just breathtaking – the archaeological site is situated on the southern flank of the Parnassus Mountains, dominating the entire valley. You can see the Gulf of Corinth right from the temples, and due to the steep slope you feel like Delphi is built on many floors with the stadium being the roof. The oracle might be related to faults under the temple; some authors speculate that gas vents (ethane?) caused hallucinations of the priest, which were interpreted as the oracle. Another nice thing is that you can see the archaeoseismological damage from strong historical earthquakes everywhere – cracks, rotated and tilted walls, corner break-outs, dropped keystones in arches and so on. Continue reading “Saturday Geology Picture: Delphi, Greece”

Wednesday Geology Picture: Salty creek in Potash, Utah

Here’s the Wednesday Geology Picture as part of Evelyn’s meme. Close to the Arches National Park in Utah there is Potash, a bizarre place with saltworks that shimmer in incredible colours. Here, salt is leached from the underground and then dried in the sun. The roads that lead to the Dead Horse State Park have to cross little creeks at times, where the salt precipitated and formed glittering crystals. I had the opportunity to do some research in that area with my great colleagues Heijn and Michael in May this year. Continue reading “Wednesday Geology Picture: Salty creek in Potash, Utah”