Preliminary report on the earthquake environmental effects triggered by the Cephalonia quakes

A team of geologists mapped the earthquake environmental effects (EEEs) of the two M6+ events that occurred at the Greek Island of Cephalonia on 26 January and 3 February, 2014. G. Papathanassiou, A. Ganas, S. Valkaniotis, M. Papanikolaou and S. Pavlides participated in these field campaigns. George Papathanassiou sent me the preliminary report today. The team found widespread evidence for “liquefaction, road-fill failures, rock falls, small landslides and stonewall failures“. Continue reading “Preliminary report on the earthquake environmental effects triggered by the Cephalonia quakes”

Special Issue in Annals of Geophysics – Earthquake geology: science, society and critical facilities (open access)

The latest issue of Annals of Geophysics is devoted to Earthquake geology: science, society and critical facilities. Vol 56 (6) is a Special Volume, and I am proud to say it’s our volume! Finally, 14 papers are included in this issue, most of them authored by early career researchers (ECRs). The papers are based on work presented at the 2nd INQUA meeting on Active Tectonics, Earthquake Geology, Archaeology and Engineering in Corinth, Greece, 2011. The issue was edited by Christoph Grützner, Salvatore Barba, Ioannis Papanikolaou and Raul Pérez-López and all papers are open access! Continue reading “Special Issue in Annals of Geophysics – Earthquake geology: science, society and critical facilities (open access)”

The Iberfault 2014 meeting – 2nd Iberian meeting on Active Faults and Paleoseismology, 22-24 October, Lorca, Spain

After the 1st Iberfault meeting in 2010, the 2nd meeting will take place in Lorca, Spain from 22-24 October, 2014. Any research on active tectonics and paleoseismology in Iberia is welcome, a special focus will be set on the QUAFI database. The conference will be organized by José Martinez Díaz (UCM), Eulàlia Masana (UB) and Miguel A. Rodríguez (IGME). Lorca became famous in 2011 when a shallow MW5.1 earthquake killed 9 people and caused severe damages in the city (there is an ongoing discussion whether or not groundwater lowering for irrigation during the last decades has caused, triggered, or influenced the quake).

Continue reading “The Iberfault 2014 meeting – 2nd Iberian meeting on Active Faults and Paleoseismology, 22-24 October, Lorca, Spain”

Georadar on active (?) faults in Oman

I am currently at GUtech in Oman, a sister university of RWTH Aachen University, for teaching Geophysics and I spend most of the free time in the field with my colleague Gösta Hoffmann. On Friday we went to the Batinah area NW of Mascat to look for active faults. The Batinah is a plain of most likely Quaternary age, made up from the sediments delivered from the huge mountains in the south. Folded Tertiary limestones are cropping out close to the mountain range. Some of them are covered by Quaternary gravels, others aren’t. Continue reading “Georadar on active (?) faults in Oman”

Annals of Geophysics Vol. 55 – Active Tectonics in the Mediterranean and Europe

Annals of Geophysics’ latest Special Issue 55-5 is focussed on Earthquake Geology: Active tectonics in the Mediterranean and Europe: site studies and application of new methodologies. This issue was edited by L. Cucci, P. M. De Martini, E. Masana, and K. Vanneste and contains seven papers. As always, all articles are open access. Continue reading “Annals of Geophysics Vol. 55 – Active Tectonics in the Mediterranean and Europe”

Inside a fault

In September, Klaus and me lead a MSc student excursion to southwestern Germany. We not only went through the entire stratigraphy of that area (mainly Triassic and Jura), but also visited the salt mine in Stetten, quarries in Dotternhausen (opalinus clay, posidonia schist, Malm), the Kaiserstuhl carbonatite volcano complex and the Upper Rhine Graben area. One of my personal highlights was the Freudenstädter Graben, a small tectonic graben striking NW-SE, whose NE main fault is exposed in an old mine in Hallwangen. Continue reading “Inside a fault”

What’s up? The Friday links (45)

Nature published three articles on the Sumatra April 2012 mega-strike-slip earthquakes. I am pretty sure that at least one of them will be discussed intensely. Earlier this year, two earthquakes with magnitudes of M8.6 and M8.2, respectively, occurred in the Indian Ocean off Sumatra. The epicentres were close to the epicentral area of the 2004 Christmas event, but further to the SW and entirely on the Indo-Australian plate. This was surprising for many reasons: We did not expect such strong strike-slip quakes, we did not expect them to happen intraplate, and we were surprised by the complex en echelon and orthogonal fault pattern.  Continue reading “What’s up? The Friday links (45)”