Three Postdoctoral positions in paleoseismology and seismology @ ICTP Trieste, Italy

The following very interesting mail reached us by Abdelkrim Aoudia from the ICTP in Trieste (Italy):

Three Postdoctoral positions in paleoseismology and seismology

are available at the Earth System Physics (ESP) section of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP).  The two first positions (A and B) are funded by the GENERALI Group– a major player in the global insurance industry, in the framework of a research project integrating earthquake fault studies and simulations of the ground-motion.

The third position (C) is funded in the framework of an international collaborative effort following the recent Nepal Gorkha 2015 earthquake. The research topic involves a study of the structure, dynamics and seismicity of Nepal Himalaya.

Continue reading “Three Postdoctoral positions in paleoseismology and seismology @ ICTP Trieste, Italy”

First paper on the earthquake environmental effects of the 2014 Cephalonia (Greece) M6.0 quakes

On 26 January and 3 February, 2014, two strong and shallow strike-slip earthquakes of magnitude 6+ occured beneath the island of Cephalonia in Western Greece. Both events caused intense damage to buildings and infrastructure. A team of Greek geologists mapped earthquake environmental effects (EEE) such as liquefaction, road failures, rock falls, small/medium size landslides and stonewall failures. The results are now published in a paper in Tectonophysics. Continue reading “First paper on the earthquake environmental effects of the 2014 Cephalonia (Greece) M6.0 quakes”

Preliminary report on the earthquake environmental effects triggered by the Cephalonia quakes

A team of geologists mapped the earthquake environmental effects (EEEs) of the two M6+ events that occurred at the Greek Island of Cephalonia on 26 January and 3 February, 2014. G. Papathanassiou, A. Ganas, S. Valkaniotis, M. Papanikolaou and S. Pavlides participated in these field campaigns. George Papathanassiou sent me the preliminary report today. The team found widespread evidence for “liquefaction, road-fill failures, rock falls, small landslides and stonewall failures“. Continue reading “Preliminary report on the earthquake environmental effects triggered by the Cephalonia quakes”

New paper: Wiatr et al., 2013 – Slip vector analysis with high resolution t-LiDAR scanning

A new paper in Tectonophysics deals with the use of terrestrial LiDAR for identifying the slip vectors on fault planes. Thomas Wiatr, Klaus Reicherter, Ioannis Papanikolaou, Tomás Fernandez-Steeger and Jack Mason collected and processed data from Crete island (Greece), where they scanned the scarp of the Spili Fault. They imaged numerous kinematic (slip direction) indicators like slickensides with this relatively new technique. The t-LiDAR data were then compared to traditional compass measurements in order to get an idea about the derivation betwen old-school measurements and high-tech methods.  Continue reading “New paper: Wiatr et al., 2013 – Slip vector analysis with high resolution t-LiDAR scanning”

Earthquakes and dust clouds

Today’s post of the Landslide Blog about a rockfall caused by a volcanic earthquake reminds me about something that’s in my mind for years already. Could we use dust deposits as a paleoseismological archive? Dust clouds of all sizes, ranging from tiny to huge, can be associated with seismic shaking, especially in arid and mountainous regions. Here I have collected a few videos I found on YouTube. When large amounts of dust settle they should form a distinctive layer recognizable in the sedimentary record, comparable to volcanic ash deposits. Of course they will be harder to be identified, since the material is the local one. I guess this could be done, similar to turbidites in marine paleoseismology. There are papers that describe changes in the aerosol content in the atmosphere after earthquakes, so why not look for them on earth? Continue reading “Earthquakes and dust clouds”

What’s up? The Friday links (48)

On Thursday, a new seismometer station was inaugurated in the Cathedral of Aachen, Germany. The station is part of the regional network of the state’s geological survey. During recent reconstruction works, we discovered damages in the cathedral that date back to around AD 800. Cracked walls and repaired floors clearly pointed to earthquake damage. Check out these two papers for more info. Then, the idea came up to install a seismometer directly in the cellar of the Cathedral to monitor seismicity and we are quite happy that its ready now! Continue reading “What’s up? The Friday links (48)”