Tectonic Studies Group field trip to Death Valley, April 2017

The Tectonic Studies Group (TSG) will organise a field trip to Death Valley in April 2017. The trip will be of particular interest for those who wish to learn more about tectono-volcanic processes, tectono-sedimentary processes, and the Basin and Range/ San Andreas system.

The trip is being organised and delivered by Phil Benson & Derek Rust of the University of Portsmouth. Continue reading “Tectonic Studies Group field trip to Death Valley, April 2017”

Symposium on Mega Earthquake Induced Geo-disasters – The field trips part II: Qipan gully debris flow

It’s Friday – but instead of the Friday links I have the story of a giant post earthquake debris flow in the Wenchuan area for you. As I already announced in my last post about the field trip to the Wenchuan earthquake epicenter in frame of the International Symposium on Mega-Earthquake Induced Geo-disasters and Long Term Effects in Chengdu, China, I still wanted to blog about the Qipan gully debris flow that we also visited during the field trip. After giving you some background information I will take you on the hike with us. We will first see massive destruction in the residential area and then have a look at the debris flow deposits and some mitigation structures while climbing up the gully. Come on, let’s go! Continue reading “Symposium on Mega Earthquake Induced Geo-disasters – The field trips part II: Qipan gully debris flow”

This was the Fucino15 meeting – part III

In the last two posts I have reported on the scientific sessions of the Fucino15 conference and on the first of the field trips. This post is about the L’Aquila field trip. I haven’t been to this city before and I was curious to see the place that sadly became so famous in earthquake science. I was surprised by how many heavily damaged buildings were still standing and by the overwhelming amount of historical buildings that await their reconstruction. We were given a great tour through the Palazzo Ardinghelli which is currently being rebuilt, then we had a look at the worst-affected parts of the city. Here’s a report in images. Continue reading “This was the Fucino15 meeting – part III”

This was the Fucino15 meeting – part II

I blogged about the scientific sessions at the Fucino15 meeting last week, here’s my report about the pre- and post-meeting field trips. The pre-meeting field trip was held in Rome, where we explored the archaeological and historical evidence for earthquake damage in the Eternal City. After the conference we followed the traces of the 1915 Fucino earthquake and then finally visited L’Aquila. This blog covers Rome and the geological field trips, a special on L’Aquila will follow later. Continue reading “This was the Fucino15 meeting – part II”

5th PATA Days in Busan – abstract volume and field trip guide available for download

The 5th PATA Days have been a great experience. We had lots of interesting science and discussions, great field trips, wonderful social events and a quite thoroughly insight into Korean cuisine. It was for sure the best organized PATA Days meeting that took place so far – many thanks and congratulations to Prof. Young-Seog Kim, Dr. Jin-Hyuck Choi and the fantastic Korean organizing team.

If you want to download the abstract volume and the field trips guide, here are the free download links: Continue reading “5th PATA Days in Busan – abstract volume and field trip guide available for download”

PATA Days in Busan, Korea, have started

The 5th PATA Days (5th International INQUA Meeting on Paleoseismology, Active Tectonics and Archeoseismology) have started with a great icebreaker party on Sunday. On Monday we went on a field trip to Korea’s east coast and had a look at uplifted Late Quaternary terraces and some relatively young thrust faults. Plus, we visited a nuclear waste deposit site. Today the first presentations will start at 10 a.m. and the first poster session will be held. Here are some impressions from the first days:

Continue reading “PATA Days in Busan, Korea, have started”

A paleoseismicity-spy and desert geologist in Alaska

The SSA2014 annual meeting took place in Anchorage, Alaska from 29 April – 2 May. Currently the post-meeting excursion on the effects of the Great Alaska Earthquake of 1964 is taking place, and we placed our paleoseismicity-spy Gösta Hoffmann in the group. We hope that no one realizes that he’s a desert geologist and absolutely in the wrong place, but he promised to not wear his Teva sandals in order not be identified. Gösta is Associate Professor at the German University of Technology in Oman (GUtech) and works on coastal change and tsunamis, and particularly on tsunamis in the Arabian Sea. Here is his report from Alaska: Continue reading “A paleoseismicity-spy and desert geologist in Alaska”

Fieldtrip guide for download: 4D Architecture of an Oblique Rift Margin – Paleoseismology of the Borrego and Laguna Salada Faults (MEX)

The Friends of the Pleistocene went on a fieldtrip few days ago to study the 4D Architecture of an Oblique Rift Margin in Baja California, NW Mexico. The tour focussed on the paleoseismology of the Borrega and Laguna Salada Faults, especially on the 1982 and 2010 surface ruptures, and took place fom 27 February to 2 March, 2014. You can download the detailed field guide and the road log here. Continue reading “Fieldtrip guide for download: 4D Architecture of an Oblique Rift Margin – Paleoseismology of the Borrego and Laguna Salada Faults (MEX)”