Posts in the category »   «  ( 144 Posts )

  • New papers on paleoseismology, tsunamis, and the Gorkha Earthquake

    A few days ago, SRL published a special issue on the Gorkha earthquakes with lots of interesting papers. I especially like the work of Angster et al. with their impressive photos of the earthquake ground effects. Make sure to download the electronic supplement to this article!

    Besides this special issue, a good number of other interesting papers have been published recently on paleoseismicity, active tectonics, seismic hazard, and tsunamis. Among them is Andi’s work on the Ejina basin and Serva et al. with a introduction of using the ESI scale for earthquake hazard assessments. Enjoy reading! more

  • This was my field work on active faults in Kazakhstan 2015 (pt. I)

    I’ve spent several weeks in Eastern Kazakhstan this summer for paleoseismological field work. During the first part of this trip we looked at some thrust and strike-slip faults in the Ili Basin and the Saty area. The second part was almost entirely devoted to study the Dzhungarian Fault. I’ll blog about this second part later. Eleanor, David, Austin and me were the UK representatives in our team. We were so lucky to have Kanatbek from Kyrgyzstan and Aydin from Kazakhstan with us. They did not only lead us to all the interesting places and helped us to understand the geology and the tectonics, but they also did a fanatastic job organizing the field trip and dealing with the local surprises, which as you know happen in basically every field trip.

    Our first study site was located at the northern boundary of the Ili Basin, where we did some work last year already. more

  • New paper: Evolution of dilatant faults in the Canyonlands NP, Utah

    The Canyonlands National Park, Utah, is famous for its beautiful landscape and spectacular landforms. For many geoscientists it is also well-known as a sandstone reservoir analogue and as a tourist you’ll often run into groups of geologists on field trips. It’s a matter of debate how and how fast the beautiful grabens in the Needles Fault zone formed – these are large arcuate canyons several tens of kilometres in length, paralleling the Colorado River. In a new paper we present results from remote sensing, mapping, and georadar (GPR). Our aim was to better understand the coupling between deformation, erosion and deposition in such an active system. Based on our findings we developed a model of graben formation and describe the geometry of the dilatant faults at depth. We argue that either the grabens are older than previously assumed or that sedimentation rates were much higher in the Pleistocene.

    more

  • Latest papers on Paleoseismology, Active Tectonics, and Tsunamis

    Summer time is publishing time! Lots of new papers are out, today we have

    • archaeoseismology & rotated objects;
    • paleoseismology in Korea, China, & Portugal;
    • trench photomosaicking and PBRs;
    • lots of tectonic geomorphology (i.e., Ximena’s paper on the Carboneras fault where I did my diploma thesis in 2004…);
    • news from the Balochistan earthquake; and
    • tsunamis.

    Enjoy reading and tell us if something is missing!

    more

  • Surface ruptures of the 1891 Nobi earthquake

    At the XIX INQUA congress in Japan I had the chance to see the surface ruptures of the 1891 Nobi earthquake during the mid-congress excursion M-2. This quake caused huge damage, but more interestingly for me, it produced amazing surface ruptures which are preserved even more than a hundred years after the event. The M7.5-M8 quake occurred in a mountainous area and was mainly strike-slip (more than 8 m!), but significant vertical uplift was found at step-overs. In 1991, the wonderful Neodani Fault Museum opened to the public, its main attraction being a paleoseismological trench exhibiting more than 5 m of vertical offset! Simply astonishing. Thanks to Atsumasa Okada, Heitaro Kaneda and Keitaro for this great excursion! more

  • Italy’s Database of Individual Seismogenic Sources (DISS) v. 3.2.0 now online

    Great news from Italy – A new version of the Database of Individual Seismogenic Sources (DISS) is now online! A huge amount of work went into this latest release which has several important updates and a fantastic new amount of data. Our colleague Umberto Fracassi sent me the following description of the new features:

    more

  • Paleoseismology at EGU2015

    The EGU2015 will be held from 12 – 17 April in Vienna, but the abstract deadline is much closer: Day after tomorrow, 7 January! So if you haven’t already done so, it’s time to have a look at paleoseismology-related sessions at EGU: more

  • Hokudan 2015 International Symposium on Active Faulting,12-17 January

    The Hokudan 2015 International Symposium on Active Faulting will be held from 12-17 January at Awaji Yumebutai International Conference Center and Hokudan Earthquake Memorial Park in Awaji City, Awaji Island, Japan.

    more

  • New paleoseismology papers

    Several recently published studies deal with paleoseismology and related fields, especially tsunamis and archaeoseismology.

    Do you feel some important papers are missing? Contact us and tell us! more

  • Paleoseismology sessions at the XIX INQUA 2015, Nagoya, Japan

    The EEE Metrics Project & IFG Paleoseismology and Active Tectonics will host two paleoseismology sessions at the XIX INQUA 2015 in Japan. The congress will be held in Nagoya from 27 July – 2 August. Deadline for abstract submission and travel grant application is 20 December, 2014, deadline for early bird registration is 28 February 2015. more

Events

See all Events

The Network

The paleoseismicity.org directory is a list of the people who work on paleoseismology.

If you want to be listed here and if you fulfill the criteria, please fill this form.

See all Entries

Newsletter

Just click the "Unsubscribe" link which you find in every newsletter you get and your email adress will be removed from the subscribers list in seconds.

Facebook

Sharing Options

Digg this
Delicious
Stumbleupon
Reddit
Like us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter
Follow us on Google +
The paleosesismicity.org group on LinkedIn
Subscribe to the paleoseismicity Newsletter