EGU session “Paleoseismicity, active faulting, surface deformation, and the implications on seismic hazard assessment (Fault2SHA)”

Dear colleagues,

we wish you a Happy New Year and would like to advertise our session on “Paleoseismicity, active faulting, surface deformation, and the implications on seismic hazard assessment (Fault2SHA)” at the EGU General Assembly in Vienna (April 8-13, 2018). Please consider submitting an abstract before the deadline on Wednesday, 10 January 2018, 13:00 Central European Time. Please consider contributing with your studies by submitting your abstract here:

http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2018/session/27065
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Almaty sits on a huge active fault, and here is why we know

Almaty, the former capital of Kazakhstan and home to ~2 million people, is a rapidly growing, vibrant city, beautifully situated at the foothills of the mighty Zailisky Alatau, the northernmost mountain range of the Tien Shan at this longitude. The city sits on a huge alluvial fan with the snow-capped mountains in the background, reaching 5,000 m elevation. Almaty has suffered from earthquakes in its young history: in 1887, the Verny earthquake with a magnitude of about 7.3 had its epicentre a few kilometres west of the city but did not produce surface ruptures (Verny is the old name of Almaty). Only two years later, the M8 Chilik earthquake ruptured the surface 100 km to the southeast of Almaty. Finally, Almaty was heavily damaged by the 1911 Chon Kemin earthquake with a magnitude of ~8, which occurred on the southern flank of the Zailisky Alatau. In our new paper we now report on a fault that did not rupture in historical times, but surely did so in the Holocene – and this fault is right beneath the city. Continue reading “Almaty sits on a huge active fault, and here is why we know”

AGU session on the development and application of chronometers in geomorphology

Sarah Boulton and colleagues will convene an interesting session at the AGU Fall Meeting. They collect contributions on the development and application of geochronometres, techniques that most of us use in everyday life for dating landscape changes and fault activity. EP047: The development and application of chronometers in geomorphology.

Session Description

Isotopes and other quantitative tracers are widely used to quantify rates of geomorphic processes and to fingerprint sediment sources and sinks. However, these techniques, including short-lived fallout radionuclides, cosmogenic radionuclides, optically stimulated luminescence, and thermochronology, all have methodological assumptions that limit their usefulness in geomorphology. This session invites studies using geochemical methods to investigate the rates and progress of landscape change with a particular focus on geomorphic response to perturbations such as environmental change, anthropogenic impact, and tectonic drivers. We also welcome studies that consider new developments in geochronologic techniques or test the limitations and assumptions behind commonly employed methods.
Primary Convener:  Sarah J Boulton, Plymouth University, Plymouth, PL4, United Kingdom
Conveners:  Amanda C Henck Schmidt, Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH, United States, Paul R Bierman, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, United States and Kevin P Norton, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand

New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Apr 2017)

Today in the paper round-up (April 2017): Active Tectonics of the Makran, postseismic deformation at Bam, active faults and paleoseismology in Italy, Switzerland & Alaska, the first papers on the Kaikoura earthquake, tsunamis in Chile and the Western Mediterranean, and faults in Mexico. Enjoy reading! Continue reading “New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Apr 2017)”

New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Dec 2016)

A continuous flow of images from the New Zealand earthquake reaches the earthquake geology community, and we’re probably all amazed by the coseismic offsets and other earthquake effects. However, the flow of papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics also does not stop and here is my digest for December. Enjoy reading!

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Special Issue in Annals of Geophysics on the Amatrice earthquakes

Annals of Geophysics has just published a special issue on the devastating Amatrice Earthquake series in Central Italy: Vol 59, Fast Track 5 (2016): The Amatrice seismic sequence: preliminary data and results.

The special issue, edited by Marco Anzidei and Silvia Pondrelli, contains lots of field reports, first assessments, and plenty of primary data. Plus, it’s all OPEN ACCESS! Continue reading “Special Issue in Annals of Geophysics on the Amatrice earthquakes”

Preliminary Map of Co-Seismic Landslides for the M 7.8 Kaikoura, New Zealand Earthquake

The M7.8 Kaikoura Earthquake in New Zealand produced one of the most complex ruptures ever observed, involving many different faults. Earthquake environmental effects include up to 10 m offset at the Kekerengu Fault, secondary ruptures, a tsunami, coseismic uplift, landslides and rockfalls, liquefaction, and maybe even earthquake lights. Lots of blogs and websites provide coverage on this earthquake, e.g. Geonet, the Landslide Blog, and The Trembling Earth. Our colleagues from the Research Group on Earthquake Geology in Greece worked on the landslides that happened during the earthquake. George Papathanassiou sent me the link to their Preliminary Map of Co-Seismic Landslides for the M 7.8 Kaikoura, New Zealand Earthquake. Continue reading “Preliminary Map of Co-Seismic Landslides for the M 7.8 Kaikoura, New Zealand Earthquake”