Posts in the category »   «  ( 24 Posts )

  • Paleoseismological field work in Kyrgyzstan

    A few weeks ago I spent ten days of field work in the Suusamyr Valley in Kyrgyzstan. In the framework of the EwF Project and COMET a team from Oxford (Eleanor Ainscoe, Austin Elliott, Richard Walker) and Kyrgyzstan (Kanatbek Abdrakhmatov, Azat Moldobaev) re-visited the epicentral area of the 1992 MS7.3 Suusamyr earthquake. This thrust earthquake is quite special for it produced intense and widespread secondary earthquake environmental effects (landslides, rockfalls, secondary ruptures, mud eruptions, etc.), but remarkably short primary surface ruptures only. Actually, surface ruptures of several metres height were found near the Suusamyr river, but limited to few hundreds of metres in length. Some 25 km to the west, another set of surface ruptures appeared, which were only about 1 m in height and less than 3 km long. Here are some impressions from our field work. more

  • ISPRA volume “Earthquake Environmental Effect for seismic hazard assessment: the ESI intensity scale and the EEE Catalogue”

    Earthquake Environmental Effects (EEE) have proven to be valuable for describing past earthquakes and their geological imprints. The ESI2007 is a relatively new intensity scale dedicated to such effects, but also integrating traditional macroseismic scales. Examples of ESI2007 intensities assigned to large earthquakes are being collected in the EEE web catalogue hosted by the ISPRA and ESI2007-related work is conducted in the framework of INQUA.

    Another milestone now has been achieved with the ISPRA volume “Earthquake Environmental Effect for seismic hazard assessment: the ESI intensity scale and the EEE Catalogue”. This book is now available online here. It contains updates on the ESI2007, examples of applications, documentation of the EEE Android App, a huge reference list and, most importantly, the ESI2007 description in ten languages: more

  • This was the Fucino15 meeting – part III

    In the last two posts I have reported on the scientific sessions of the Fucino15 conference and on the first of the field trips. This post is about the L’Aquila field trip. I haven’t been to this city before and I was curious to see the place that sadly became so famous in earthquake science. I was surprised by how many heavily damaged buildings were still standing and by the overwhelming amount of historical buildings that await their reconstruction. We were given a great tour through the Palazzo Ardinghelli which is currently being rebuilt, then we had a look at the worst-affected parts of the city. Here’s a report in images. more

  • This was the Fucino15 meeting – part I

    Phew, this was an intense week and a great one too! The Fucino15 meeting on paleoseismology, active tectonics and archaeoseismology is over and hopefully everyone safely arrived back home. Here’s a brief report on some of the science that happened at the meeting. Since we had ~50 oral presentations, only an overview is possible here. In the following days I’ll add more details about the field trips. A big thank you to the Italian organizing team who did an amazing job – grazie mille! more

  • New paleoseismology papers

    It’s been a while since the last update on paleoseismology literature. BSSA’s latest issue has some interesting studies that you should check, and there’s even more to discover. Also, there is some new work on (paleo-)tsunamis and historic large earthquakes. If you feel that important new papers are missing, drop us a mail! more

  • Paleoseismology sessions at the XIX INQUA 2015, Nagoya, Japan

    The EEE Metrics Project & IFG Paleoseismology and Active Tectonics will host two paleoseismology sessions at the XIX INQUA 2015 in Japan. The congress will be held in Nagoya from 27 July – 2 August. Deadline for abstract submission and travel grant application is 20 December, 2014, deadline for early bird registration is 28 February 2015. more

  • 3He dating of rockfalls helps to distinguish between proximal and distal paleo-earthquakes in Christchurch, NZ

    The 2011 Christchurch earthquake series had severe consequences and surprised scientists for many reasons. Ground motions were extremely strong despite the relative moderate magnitudes of the quakes (MW 5.3-7.1). The events happened on a system of hitherto unknown faults, some of which are located directly below Christchurch. Earthquake environmental effects (EEE), especially liquefaction, were intense and widespread. It turned out that subsequent quakes reactivated the same feeder dikes of sand blows, showing that saturated sediments are susceptible of liquefaction no matter if they had been liquefied recently (also see the paper of Quigley et al. (2013) on the liquefaction effects). Another stunning lesson was the occurrence of intense rockfall in the vicinity of Christchurch. In a recently published study, Mackey and Quigley (2014) dated rockfall boulders with 3He and show that they allow to estimate the recurrence intervall of local seismic events like the 2011 series. This works is a very interesting way to use EEE for paleo-earthquake studies. more

  • Latest publications on paleoseismology and related fields

    A couple of new papers on paleoseismology and related fields have recently been published. They deal with active tectonics in China, coseismic uplift in Japan, seismites in Canada, turbidite and lake sediment paleoseismology, earthquake environmental effects in Greece, paleotsunami deposits in India, an earthquake and tsunami in 1531 in Lisbon, tsunamites in Malta, tectonic geomorphology, scaling relationships in the Med,  and the 2013 Balochistan earthquake and subsequent tsunami. If you miss recent studies here, drop us a mail. more

  • 5th PATA Days in Busan – registration deadline extended to 20 June

    Dear friends and colleagues,

    The deadline for registration of the 5th PATA-days meeting is extended to June 20, and for abstract submission to the end of June.  

    The 5th International INQUA Meeting on Paleoseismology, Active Tectonics and Archeoseismology (PATA Days) will take place in Busan, Korea from 21-27 September 2014. Already some 75 scientists from all around the world have registered for this meeting – be the next one and don’t miss the latest news on old earthquakes.

    See details on the official website: www.pata-days.org.

    Please don’t miss the last chance to visit dynamic Korea!

      more

  • First paper on the earthquake environmental effects of the 2014 Cephalonia (Greece) M6.0 quakes

    On 26 January and 3 February, 2014, two strong and shallow strike-slip earthquakes of magnitude 6+ occured beneath the island of Cephalonia in Western Greece. Both events caused intense damage to buildings and infrastructure. A team of Greek geologists mapped earthquake environmental effects (EEE) such as liquefaction, road failures, rock falls, small/medium size landslides and stonewall failures. The results are now published in a paper in Tectonophysics. more

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