Preliminary report on the 12 June, 2017, Lesvos (Greece) Earthquake

On 12 June, 2017, an earthquake with a magnitude of Mw6.3 occurred south of the island of Lesvos in Greece, damaged hundreds of buildings and claimed one life. The event ruptured a NW-SE trending normal fault and had a focal depth of 13 km. Our colleagues from the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens mapped the earthquake damage and the environmental effects that accompanied the earthquake. They found mass movements, secondary cracks, and report on a small tsunami. Their report can be downloaded here (PDF, 6 mb). For a higher-resolution file (33 mb), follow this link. Many thanks to Efthymios Lekkas for sending the report. Continue reading “Preliminary report on the 12 June, 2017, Lesvos (Greece) Earthquake”

The Great Wenchuan Earthquake eight years on: earthquake damage and coseismic landslides

Last October I was given the chance to attend the “iRALL school on field data collection, monitoring, and modeling of large landslides” in Chengdu, China. During the school, we spent one week in the epicentral area of the Ms=8.0 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, where I was able to take some interesting pictures of earthquake damage and coseismic landslides. Then other things happened, like the earthquakes in Italy and New Zealand, with exciting sights from the field shared here, and I never ended up sharing my Wenchuan pics, which I want to do now. Continue reading “The Great Wenchuan Earthquake eight years on: earthquake damage and coseismic landslides”

Paper: The Canterbury earthquake sequence and earthquake environmental effects

Now that the new dates for the 8th PATA Days 2017 in New Zealand are fixed, it is time to bring to your attention an exceptional paper that was already published in 2016. I planned to write a review long time ago, but I just managed to do so now. The paper by Quigley et al. is not only likely to become your favourite read during the long flight to New Zealand, but it will also serve as an extremely valuable contribution to the study of earthquake environmental effects (EEEs) in general. The authors report on, and summarise, the effects that the 2010-2011 Canterbury earthquake sequence had on the environment. The paper is special in many ways: Continue reading “Paper: The Canterbury earthquake sequence and earthquake environmental effects”

New dates for 2017 PATA Days in NZ: 13 – 16 November, 2017

We are pleased to announce new dates for the 2017 PATA Days Meeting: Monday 13th – Thursday 16th November, 2017.

The meeting will be held in Blenheim, at the top of the South Island, at the northern end of the Marlborough Fault System and 30 km above the southern Hikurangi subduction zone. The first full day of the meeting will be a field trip to view some of the northern fault ruptures of the 2016 Kaikoura earthquake. This will be followed by three days of talks and presentations at conference venues in Ward and Blenheim. Meeting attendees are advised to arrive in Blenheim by the 12 November, and to arrange accommodation in Blenheim for 5 nights (12 – 17 November). There will also be an optional post-meeting field trip from Friday 17 – Sunday 19 November. The post-meeting field trip will start in Blenheim and finish in Christchurch. The meeting is supported by INQUA and the main annual event of the IFG EGSHaz.

We look forward to welcoming you to New Zealand and sharing some science from our recently very active plate boundary. Find more information at the official conference website: https://www.gns.cri.nz/Home/News-and-Events/Events/PATA Continue reading “New dates for 2017 PATA Days in NZ: 13 – 16 November, 2017”

Field trip to epicentral areas of Central Apennines, Italy, earthquakes from 19-22 July, 2017

If you are interested in visiting the epicentral areas of the recent earthquakes in the Central Apennines, Italy, this is your chance: A four days field trip will be held from 19-22 July, 2017, led by researchers who have studied the earthquake effects in detail. The trip focusses on the fault system that ruptured during the 1997 Umbria Marche, 2009 L’Aquila, and 2016 Norcia events. The trip is organised by scientists from Italy, France, UK, and Greece, and supported by a number of universities, state agencies, and INQUA, with the Università di Camerino as the main coordinator.

More information will be published soon. Continue reading “Field trip to epicentral areas of Central Apennines, Italy, earthquakes from 19-22 July, 2017”

Special Session at SSA2017 in Denver on Toppled and Rotated Objects

A special session on Toppled and Rotated Objects in Recent, Historic, and Prehistoric Earthquakes will be held during the upcoming 2017 Annual Meeting of the Seismological Society of America in Denver, Colorado from 18-20 April 2017.  Session Chairs will be Klaus-G. Hinzen and Rasool Anooshehpoor.

The main purpose of the session is to bring together researchers with diverse backgrounds (e.g., seismology, engineering, history, heritage conservation) who are interested in the behavior of objects, monuments, or simple structures during earthquakes and the stories which deformed, rotated or toppled objects can tell. The session will cover all aspects of toppled or rotated objects or simple structures which have suffered heavy deformation or damage during earthquakes. Topics will include: (1) observations, (2) documentation, (3) model building, (4) restoration, (5) mapping, and (6) correlation with geology.

Recent earthquake research has postulated correlation between the reaction of objects (monuments, columns, tombstones, etc.) and the seismic source in addition to local effects due to geological site conditions. As the laws of physics are time invariant, knowledge gained in reconnaissance surveys from well-studied instrumental earthquakes can reveal information about ground motions during historical and prehistorical earthquakes. Particular interest will be directed to man-made structures; however, due to similarities of the techniques used to study precariously balanced rocks and speleothems, contributions from these fields are also welcome.

The deadline for all proposed presentations, invited or otherwise, is 5 pm PST January 11, 2016.  All abstracts must be submitted by the deadline. Submitting abstracts through the online submission system only (There is a submission fee of $80 for regular attendees, $40 for students).

 

There are lots of other interesting sessions on earthquake geology, paleoseismology and related topics at the SSA meeting, make sure to check the full programme: http://meetings.seismosoc.org/special-sessions/

Special Issue in Annals of Geophysics on the Amatrice earthquakes

Annals of Geophysics has just published a special issue on the devastating Amatrice Earthquake series in Central Italy: Vol 59, Fast Track 5 (2016): The Amatrice seismic sequence: preliminary data and results.

The special issue, edited by Marco Anzidei and Silvia Pondrelli, contains lots of field reports, first assessments, and plenty of primary data. Plus, it’s all OPEN ACCESS! Continue reading “Special Issue in Annals of Geophysics on the Amatrice earthquakes”

Preliminary Map of Co-Seismic Landslides for the M 7.8 Kaikoura, New Zealand Earthquake

The M7.8 Kaikoura Earthquake in New Zealand produced one of the most complex ruptures ever observed, involving many different faults. Earthquake environmental effects include up to 10 m offset at the Kekerengu Fault, secondary ruptures, a tsunami, coseismic uplift, landslides and rockfalls, liquefaction, and maybe even earthquake lights. Lots of blogs and websites provide coverage on this earthquake, e.g. Geonet, the Landslide Blog, and The Trembling Earth. Our colleagues from the Research Group on Earthquake Geology in Greece worked on the landslides that happened during the earthquake. George Papathanassiou sent me the link to their Preliminary Map of Co-Seismic Landslides for the M 7.8 Kaikoura, New Zealand Earthquake. Continue reading “Preliminary Map of Co-Seismic Landslides for the M 7.8 Kaikoura, New Zealand Earthquake”

New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Oct 2016)

A lot of new papers have been published on paleoseismology, earthquake geology, active tectonics and tsunamis last month. We have research on slowly deforming regions, on the active tectonics of Mexico, New Zealand, Armenia, and Iran, new data from the Kumamoto earthquake, plus some marine/coastal paleoseismology and tsunami studies. Enjoy reading!

Continue reading “New papers on paleoseismology, tsunami, and active tectonics (Oct 2016)”