New data from the Northern Italy Mw6.1 earthquake (20 May 2012)

The INGV has published some new data on the earthquake that hit Italy in the morning of 20 May, 2012 and caused damages and casualties. Peak ground accelerations (PGA) reached 28%g in the epicentral area. This is not unusual for an event of that size. Peak ground velocities (PGV) were as high as 20 cm/s. The spectral response is more interesting. The 3s period response is 1.5%g only, at 1s period the area encountered 18%g, and for the 0.3s period the values reached 49%g, which is quite a lot for a Mw6.1 quake. However, the longer periods tend to be more dangerous for buildings. Continue reading “New data from the Northern Italy Mw6.1 earthquake (20 May 2012)”

3rd INQUA-IGCP 567 International Workshop on Active Tectonics, Paleoseismology and Archeoseismology, Morelia (Mexico), 18 – 24 November 2012

The 3rd INQUA-IGCP 567 International Workshop on Active Tectonics, Paleoseismology and Archeoseismology will be held in Morelia (Mexico) from 18 – 24 November 2012. The workshop is the continuation of the BaeloClaudia2009 and Corinth2011 events. We invite all scientists in the fields of earthquake geology, paleoseismology, archeoseismology, tsunami studies, earthquake engineering, seismic hazard assessment to participate in the workshop. We will try to provide travel grants from INQUA and IGCP for young scientists. See Acambay1912.org for detailled information, registration and abstract submission.

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Abstract deadline for European Seismological Commission meeting is approaching (31 March)

Dear friends and colleagues,
we would like to remind you that there is less than a week left before the deadline for abstract submission – March 31, 2012 for the ESC-12 conference (http://www.esc2012-moscow.org/index.html).

We invite you to take part in a Paleoseismology symposium:
Continue reading “Abstract deadline for European Seismological Commission meeting is approaching (31 March)”

Excursion and field work in Greece – landslides, rock falls, fault scarps

Since ten days I am in Greece now with a dozen of students. We started with an excursion in the western Peloponessus area and had a look at the regional tectonics, sedimentology (mainly Neogene Flysch units and young beach rocks), the large limestone horsts of Gavrovo and Ionian units, Ancient Olympia and recent mass movements. Then we began with field work for BSc, MSc and PhD theses. Continue reading “Excursion and field work in Greece – landslides, rock falls, fault scarps”

10th Symposium on Engineering Geology and the Environment, 15-17 August 2012, Villa Carlos Paz City, Argentina

The Asociación Argentina de Geología Aplicada a la Ingeniería (ASAGAI), Argentina National Group of the International Association for Engineering Geology and the Environment (IAEG), invite you to participate in the Symposium that will be held on August 15, 16 and 17, 2012 at Villa Carlos Paz City, Cordoba Province, Argentina.

Download the conference flyer here.

Topics:

  • Groundwater
  • Engineering geological mapping
  • Work cases
  • Contamination of natural resources
  • Applied engineering geology education
  • Geotechnical studies
  • Environmental evaluation of plans, projects and works
  • Geoindicators
  • Environmental geology
  • Water resources management
  • Construction materials
  • Land planning
  • Geologic hazards
  • Engineering-geological problems in works
  • Recuperation of degraded lands


Größere Kartenansicht

What’s up? The Friday links (22)

Emil Wiechert was born 150 years ago (26 December 1861). He not only invented modern Geophysics and Seismology, but he also had the first chair of Geophysics worldwide (1898 in Göttingen, Germany). Wiechert became famous for his seismograph. Now the Deutsche Post released a special stamp showing Wiechert, his seismograph and the original seismogram of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake as registered in Göttingen, Germany!

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M5.6 earthquake in Oklahoma

A series of earthquakes has hit Oklahoma, with a M5.6 being the strongest one. The main quake was preceeded by a M4.8 and several smaller ones. A number of aftershocks took place, some of them stronger than M3.0. The epicentre was situated close to Prague about 50 km west of Oklahoma City. All quakes occured in very shallow depth (< 10 km). No injuries have been reported so far, but it seems that some minor damage occured. Quakes of this strength can be felt over hundreds of kilometers in central and eastern US.

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